NIST Assess Internet of Things (IoT) Research Efforts

Jun 21, 2021

by ASME.org

The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has embarked on an effort to assess the current state of the Internet of Things (IoT) and determine how the federal government can better accelerate investment in research and development (R&D) and facilitate technology transfer. The department’s pursuit of information to further inform the adoption and deployment of IoT coincides with the emerging technology now ranking as strategically important by each major federal agency that focuses on economic competitiveness and national security.
 
To better understand the current state of IoT in the U.S., NIST is funding research aimed at these four goals:
  1. To better understand the current state of IoT research efforts.
  2. To assess the top technology infrastructure gaps.
  3. To quantify the benefits of closing those gaps.
  4. To identify where future federal research investments should be made, whether it be in targeted research investments, stimulating private sector investment incentives, or other methods. 
Strategy of Things is one company receiving a NIST research grant to examine IoT opportunities in key industries, such as manufacturing. As part of Strategy of Things’ outreach, ASME was consulted to gain additional intel on federal R&D policy that may impact the development and adoption of IoT. This partnership is referenced by Gordon Feller in his IndustryWeek article on the topic: “Benson Chan, senior partner at Strategy of Things, [has] been working with a network of allies, in government and the private sector, to ensure that this NIST research project assists key leaders.” ASME is glad to have supported the initiative and provided technical expertise on federal policymaking.
 
To read the full IndustryWeek article, which outlines the NIST IoT research in detail, please visit: https://www.industryweek.com/technology-and-iiot/emerging-technologies/article/21166651/where-is-iot-headed-nist-looks-at-gaps-in-research-infrastructure.

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