OMAE®

36th International Conference on Ocean,
Offshore & Arctic Engineering

Clarion Hotel & Congress Trondheim, Trondheim, Norway

Conference
June 25-30, 2017

Program - Short Courses

 

The Application of CFD to Offshore Projects with Emphasis on Vortex Induced

Course Title: The Application of CFD to Offshore Projects with Emphasis on Vortex Induced Motions
Date: 2 Day Course
Saturday, June 24, 2017
Sunday, June 25, 2017
Time: 9:00 am – 5:00 pm
Instructors: Dr. Sam Holmes, Red Wing Engineering, San Francisco, CA, USA

Bio:
Dr. Holmes has over 40 years of engineering experience specializing in the study of fluid dynamics and the dynamic response of structures. He is the author of over 50 technical publications on topics ranging from the vortex induced vibration of risers to the dynamic buckling of thin shells. His work on the application of computational fluid dynamics to offshore problems spans the last 17 years during which he contributed to a number of developments including the first studies of three dimensional flows around flexible risers and the use of CFD to predict platform vortex induced motions. Dr. Holmes work experience began at Stanford Research Institute (now SRI International) where he studied the large plastic deformations of structures and blast effects. His most recent positions were as Vice President of Engineering Services at Acusim Software, Inc. and as a Group Leader at Applied Research Associates, Inc. He now heads his own engineering consultancy, Red Wing Engineering, Inc.

ACADEMIC BACKGROUND
Ph.D., Applied Mechanics, Drexel University, 1971
Ph.D. Thesis, Wave Propagation in Composite Materials
MS, Applied Mechanics, Drexel University, 1968
BS, Mechanical Engineering, Drexel University, 1966
PROFESSIONAL ASSOCIATIONS AND HONORS
Member - American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Member - International Center for Transportation Studies
Phi Kappa Phi Honor Society
Pi Tau Sigma Honor Society
NSF Fellowship

Course description

This course combines a comprehensive review of fluid mechanics and numerical methods with practical considerations for integrating a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) program in offshore engineering projects. The objective is to help engineers and engineering managers implement and maintain an effective computational fluid dynamics (CFD) capability within their organization. A special emphasis is placed on vortex induced vibration (VIV) and vortex induced motion (VIM) problems. Those attending the course will receive an up to date review of the status and use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) in some specific offshore applications along with recent developments in related diverse topics such as turbulence modeling, computer hardware and computer software selection, cloud computing, and more. The cost and benefits of CFD will also be discussed. An extensive bibliography of useful references will be handed out during the course.

Course Outline

Day 1 – Because CFD is used to solve a wider range of problems than can be covered in a short time, the course focus this year will be on predicting the VIV of risers and pipelines and the VIM of platforms (floaters). Many practical examples and guidance will be given regarding these problems. The course will start with a short history of VIV including some notable past experiments and analyses relevant to the offshore industry. This will be followed by a review of turbulence models including recent developments and trends. The physics of VIV will be covered next with specific examples using CFD to solve for hydrodynamic properties of complex structures such as blowout preventers (BOP). Finally, the first day will close with a hands on workshop where CFD will be used to solve a practical problem.

Day 2 – The day will begin with a description of the platform VIM problem. The emphasis will be on the practical prediction of VIM including past experience with turbulence models, grid refinement, the modeling and influence of external features such as small pipes and anodes and the potential influence of surface waves. Three important and perhaps open topics will be covered in detail, 1) the influence of surface roughness 2) the problem of scaling tow tank scale solutions to full scale and 3) the modeling of sheared currents.

Following the discussion of platform VIM, the fluid-structure interaction (FSI) problem of modeling flexible bodies such as risers and jumpers will be discussed. The current limitations CFD in the treatment of long risers will be covered and specific tips will be given for setting up these problems including the selection of a structural model, the correct time step, and grid refinement. A simple method for laying out the expected frequencies in a solution will be given to assure that the solution will find the needed response modes. Finally, a method of problem set up will be given to shorten solution time and save computer resources. A closing lecture will cover some special topics such as drilling riser vibration and moon-pool fluid dynamics. At the end of day 2, a hands on workshop will allow attendees to solve flexible body problem with the use of cloud computing

You will learn to:

  • A full review of CFD methods and tools
  • A better understanding of VIV and VIM physics
  • Many practical methods for the solution of important fluid flow and combined fluid-structure interaction problems
  • A review of the costs in dollars and labor to implement and maintain CFD expertise in house

Who should attend?
This course will be useful for engineers at all levels of experience who wish to apply CFD to offshore engineering problems. Because we will also discuss the practical problems in incorporating CFD into the development cycle including hardware, software and labor costs, engineering managers should also benefit.

Cost:

  • Member/Non-member: NOK2,120.00

Fixed and Floating Offshore Wind Turbines: Dynamic Analysis and Marine

Course Title: Fixed and Floating Offshore Wind Turbines: Dynamic Analysis and Marine Operations
Date: Saturday, June 24, 2017
Time: 9:00 am – 5:00 pm
Instructors: Erin Bachynski, Norwegian University of Science and Technology and Zhen Gao, Norwegian University
of Science and Technology

Bio:
Dr. Erin Bachynski is an associate professor of marine structures in the Department of Marine Technology, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) since 2016. She holds bachelor and master’s degrees in naval architecture and marine engineering from the University of Michigan, and a PhD from NTNU, with thesis titled “Design and Dynamic Analysis of Tension Leg Platform Wind Turbines.”

Assoc. Prof. Bachynski’s main research areas are numerical and experimental modelling of offshore wind turbine structures, including hydroelasticity, nonlinear wave loads, and structural response modelling. Previous projects include development of numerical simulation tools for offshore wind turbines, including consideration of the faults, drivetrain responses, and higher-order hydrodynamic loads, as well as real-time hybrid testing of a semi-submersible wind turbine. She has been involved in the technical organization of the OMAE Conference as a session chair and topic organizer (2015-). She also serves as a reviewer for the OMAE and ISOPE conferences and journals, as well as for Marine Structures, Ocean Engineering, and Ships and Offshore Structures.

Dr. Zhen Gao is a professor of marine structures at the Department of Marine Technology, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) since 2015. His main research areas cover coupled dynamic analysis of offshore renewable energy devices (including offshore wind turbines, both bottom-fixed and floating, wave energy converters, floating tidal turbines and combined concepts); marine operations related to installation and maintenance for offshore wind turbines and other ocean renewable energy devices; probabilistic modeling and analysis of wind- and wave-induced loads and load effects in offshore structures; fatigue and ultimate structural reliability assessment of offshore platforms and mooring systems.

He has participated and is now participating in several research projects and educational programs on offshore renewable energy, including EU FP6 SEEWEC Project (2007-2009), EU FP7 MARINA Platform Project (2010-2014), IEA OC4 Project (2010-2012), EU FP7 MARE-WINT Project (2012-2016) and EWEM (European Wind Energy Master) Program (2012- ). He is a member of the Specialist Committee V.4 Offshore Renewable Energy at ISSC for 2009-2012 (committee member) and 2012-2015, 2015-2018 (committee chair). He serves as an editorial board member for three international journals (Marine Structures, Journal of Marine Science and Application, Journal of Ship Mechanics). He is also a member of the technical committee for several international conferences, including the Scientific Committee of the Structures, Safety and Reliability Symposium at the OMAE conferences since 2011.

Course description

This course reviews several considerations related to design and operation of offshore wind turbines. Fundamental concepts in aerodynamic (with focus on blade element/momentum theory) and hydrodynamic (with focus on first and second order radiation-diffraction and Morison-type models) load calculation are presented. The course addresses theoretical background and important practical considerations for structural response analysis combining these load components and wind turbine control for ULS and FLS design check. Finally, marine operational issues related to transport, installation and access to wind turbines for maintenance and repair, with focus on numerical simulation of onsite installation and weather window analysis, are discussed.

Course Outline

  • Introduction to offshore wind turbines
  • Wind and wave conditions
  • Fundamentals of wind turbine aerodynamics
  • Wind turbine controller basics
  • Hydrodynamic loads on fixed and floating wind turbines
  • Integrated dynamic analysis
  • Marine operations with focus on simulation of installation and weather window analysis

You will learn to:

  • Explain the basic wind turbine components, and types of substructures
  • Identify key external loads on offshore wind turbines and understand the theory for their estimation
  • Perform state-of-the-art global dynamic analysis of offshore wind turbines, including interactions between the wind- and wave-induced loads and responses
  • Numerically model marine operations such as installation of substructure and turbine components
  • Evaluate weather windows for offshore wind turbine installation

Who should attend?
This course is designed for offshore engineering professionals with an interest in joining the growing offshore wind turbine field, or recent graduates without experience in the offshore wind turbine industry.

Cost:

  • Member/Non-member: NOK1,660.00

Dynamics and Vibrations in Offshore Structures

Course Title: Dynamics and Vibrations in Offshore Structures
Date: Saturday, June 24, 2017
Time: 9:30 am – 5:30 pm
Instructors: Junbo Jia, Aker Solutions and Bernt Leira, Norwegian University of Science and Technology

Bio:

Dr. Junbo Jia is an engineering expert at Aker Solutions, Norway. He is currently a committee member of ISO TC67/SC7 Fixed Steel Structures and an invited member of Eurocode 3. He has been invited as speakers, lecturers for industry training and university graduate courses, and permanent members of PhD examination committees by various organizations and research institutes. Dr. Junbo Jia serves on the Editorial Board of Journal of Ships and Offshore Structures. Dr. Junbo Jia is authors of three Springer engineering monographs on Applied Dynamic Analysis, Seismic Engineering, and Foundation Dynamics and Modeling. He is currently an editor of a handbook volume: Structural Engineering in Vibrations, Dynamics and Impacts to be published by CRC press.

Bernt J. Leira is Professor at the Department of Marine Technology. His Doctoral Thesis is on structural reliability formulations involving multiple stochastic processes. He has previously been working in SINTEF, Division of Structural Engineering for a period of 20 years related to design analysis of a variety of structures. Examples are fixed offshore platforms (e.g. jackets, jack-ups, gravity platforms), long-span bridges (e.g. suspension bridges, floating bridges, submerged tubular bridges), floating production systems and marine risers (rigid risers, non-bonded flexible risers, titanium risers). He has been project manager for a number of industry projects. He has been involved in teaching at University level for a period of 25 years, and has held an industry Professorship from 1994 to 1999. He has held a full Professorship since 1999. Main areas of teaching are reliability methods, probabilistic load modelling, dynamic response analysis and design methods for marine structures. He has published more than 300 papers in scientific journals, conferences and books. Relevant ISO and other standardisation work comprises Dynamic Risers and Floating Production Systems.

Course description

An understanding of the principles of structural dynamics and vibration is important for assuring system integrity and operational functionality in different engineering areas. However, practical problems regarding dynamics are in many cases handled without success, despite large expenditures of investment. It is essential in approaching dynamic analysis and design that one develops an “intuition” to solve the relevant problems at hand; both academic knowhow and professional experience play equally important roles in developing such intuition.

To meet the objectives above, this course aims to address a wide range of topics in the field of offshore structures, starting from fundamentals and moving on to relevant and practical engineering challenges and solutions. Topics covered will include (i) engineering failures due to inappropriate accounting of dynamics; (ii) Newtonian dynamics and stochastic dynamics; (iii) nonlinear dynamics; (iv) characterizing ocean wave, wind and earthquake loadings and responses; (v) dynamics in assessing different limit states (extreme, fatigue, etc.) (vi) vibration mitigation measures. Special emphasis is placed on engineering applications that utilize state-of-the-art knowledge, the finite element method, relevant codes, probabilistic methods, and recommended practices.

Course Outline

  • Engineering Significance of Dynamics and Vibrations
  • Essentials of Structural Dynamics
  • Stochastic Dynamics
  • Nonlinear Dynamics
  • Dynamic Environmental Loadings and Responses
  • Practical Mitigation Measures Against Dynamic and Impact Loading

You will learn to:

The primary course learning objective is to provide an overview of principles in the analysis and design of offshore structures with consideration for dynamic loads. The course will also seek to offer a focus on relevant vibration mitigation measures, help develop an “intuition” and understanding for concepts in dynamics, and offer insights through the discussion of practical dynamic problems.

Who should attend?
This course is primarily intended for industry professionals, researchers, and graduate students in offshore, civil, and marine engineering who desire an introduction to principles of dynamic analysis and design as well as those who are eager to learn advanced and efficient techniques used to mitigate vibrations for offshore as well as land-based structures.

Cost:

  • Member/Non-member: NOK1,660.00

Fundamentals of Riser and Flexible Pipe Engineering - CANCELED

Course Title: Fundamentals of Riser and Flexible Pipe Engineering
Date: Sunday, June 25, 2017
Time: 8:00 am – 5:00 pm<
Instructors: Kieran Kavanagh, Wood Group

Bio:

  • Mr. Kavanagh is Technology Development Director of Wood Group Kenny, with global responsibility for technology development across WG Kenny companies.
  • He holds a Master’s degree in Offshore Engineering from University College Cork and a degree in Economics from the London School of Economics.
  • He has 29 years’ experience in offshore engineering, specializing in the design and integrity management of floating production riser subsea systems
  • He has led several joint industry projects (JIPs) and technology initiatives in floating production riser, mooring, integrity management.
  • Mr. Kavanagh has been active in the development of industry codes of practice for floating production risers (API RP2RD), drilling risers (API RP16Q) Flexible Pipes (API Spec 17J and RP17B) and Integrity Management.
  • He is 2015 chair of the Petroleum Division of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) and a fellow of the Society of Underwater Technology (SUT) and has authored extensively in riser engineering, flexible pipe technology and subsea integrity management.
  • Mr. Kavanagh previously worked as naval architect & structural engineer with Lloyd’s Register in London, specializing in ship hydrodynamics, sea keeping, maneuvering and ship structures.

Course description

This course provides attendees with the basic principles and technologies of riser and flexible pipe engineering design, fabrication and installation. It also offers them in-depth information regarding the primary drivers behind system selection for offshore floating production.

Course Outline

  1. Introduction
  2. Overview of Riser Technology
  3. Riser Design Codes
  4. Riser Selection and its Influence on Subsea Architecture
  5. Fundamentals of Riser Engineering Analysis
  6. Steel Catenary Riser Design, Materials & Fabrication
  7. Top Tensioned Risers & Hybrid Risers Design
  8. Flexible Pipe Cross Section Design , Materials & Construction
  9. Flexible Pipe Global Design & Design Drivers
  10. Flexible Pipe Industry Limits & Qualification
  11. Riser Installation

You will learn to:

  • Explain the different riser and flexible pipe concepts, configurations and materials
  • Identify key decision drivers associated with riser concept selection
  • Describe the design process associated with each riser type, with special focus on flexible pipe technology
  • Explain how apply the theory of hydrodynamic and metocean loads that drive riser design
  • Compare the technology limitsof different riser and flexible pipe concepts, whether water depth, vessel, temperature, pressure, fluid or other limits.
  • Identify and describe the design, fabrication and installation process/drivers for flexible and steel risers, to enable effective interface with these disciplines
  • Describe the responsibilities of riser and flexible pipe designers to allow attendees to interface with them effectively

Who should attend?
Early career riser engineers and other industry professionals and academics who wish to gain a fundamental understanding of the technologies associated with riser and flexible pipe engineering.

Cost:

  • Member/Non-member: NOK1,660.00

Modern Well Design - CANCELED

Course Title: Modern Well Design
Date: Sunday, June 25, 2017
Time: 8:30 am – 4:30 pm
Instructors: Bernt Aadnøy, University of Stavanger, Norway

Bio:

Bernt S. Aadnoy is a Professor of Petroleum Engineering at the University of Stavanger. Before going to academia he worked for Phillips Petroleum, Rogaland Research, Statoil and Saga Petroleum. Aadnoy has published more than 150 papers, mostly on rock mechanics and well technology but also in reservoir engineering, production and automation, and hold 10 patents. He is the author of several books such as Mechanics of Drilling, Modern Well Design, Petroleum Rock Mechanics, and is technical editor for several journals.

Aadnoy holds a mechanical engineering degree from Stavanger Tech, a BS degree in mechanical engineering from the University of Wyoming, an MS degree in control engineering from the University of Texas, and a Ph.D. in petroleum rock mechanics from the Norwegian Institute of Technology. He was the recipient of the 1999 SPE Drilling Engineering Award, is a 2015 SPE/AIME Honorary Member and a 2015 SPE Distinguished Member. He was adjunct professor at the University of the Faroe Islands building the petroleum engineering program and has also been a visiting professor at the University of Calgary and the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro. Aadnoy works in all areas of well engineering such as drilling, completion and rock mechanics.

Course description

The course presents an overview of a unified approach for the well design process. It is aimed at personnel performing work related to petroleum wells. The participants will learn elementary rock mechanics and how to analyze borehole stability problems in a simple manner. Methodology for casing seat selection and optimal mud weight selection to minimize borehole stability problems will be defined. The complete casing design process is covered, including pressure testing of casing.

A separate chapter is included on HPHT wells. Other elements covered are: experience transfer from reference wells, hydraulic optimization and interpretation of ballooning in deep wells.

Completion and production requirements are covered. Well design issues related to special wells like deep-water wells, multilateral wells and long-reach wells are covered, as well as well friction, bottom-hole-assembly design etc. The participants will receive a copy of the book: Modern Well Design – Second Edition by B.S. Aadnoy.

Course Outline

The course presents an overview of a unified approach for the well design process. Participants will learn elementary rock mechanics and how to analyse borehole stability problems. Methodology for casing seat selection and mud weight selection to minimize wellbore stability problems will be given. Applications to completion design, ordinary wells, HPHT and deep-water wells are presented. Well design issues like hydraulic optimization, torque and drag and well integrity are explored.

You will learn to:

An overview of well constructing including the critical factors that must be resolved. Methods to resolve these.

Who should attend?
Petroleum engineers, operational personnel and geologists and others working around well construction.

Cost:

  • Member/Non-member: NOK1,660.00

Subsea Pipelines - CANCELED

Course Title: Subsea Pipelines
Date: Sunday, June 25, 2017
Time: 9:00 am – 5:00 pm
Instructors: Professor Yong Bai, Zhenjiang University, China

Bio:

Prof. Yong Bai, Professor of Zhejiang University, one of the experts in Chinese fifth "Recruitment Program of 1000 Global Experts" and in Zhejiang's "Recruitment Program of 100 Experts".

He was awarded Ph.D. of naval architecture and offshore engineering from Hiroshima University in 1989. He has published over 100 academic papers, authored six English monographs and co-authored five Chinese monographs.He has been engaged in project management at DNV, ABS, JP Kenny, Shell and MCS successively and has rich engineering experience.

Leading by Prof. Bai, OPR inc. have been fully recognized in oil & gas field development worldwide since 2006.Based on his more than 30 years professional experience, OPR and his team gained plenty of knowledge and skills on offshorepipeline and riser design, installation and engineering related fields including integrity management, corrosion prevention, VIV & defect assessment, RBI, FFS, ECA, etc.

Course description

This course is provided for pipeline engineers to gain basic knowledge and advanced skills of subsea pipeline integrity management related theories, methodologies, assessment procedures and application experiences. Based on our project and teaching experiences, three of the most common topics have been chosen to cover corrosion defect assessment and Fitness For Service, Free-Span Assessment, and Risk- Based Inspection. For each topic, basic theories and methodologies will be elaborated and complemented with case studies. In the end of each topic, Q&A section will be provided for the participants to gain better understanding on the training

Course Outline

A one day course conducted by an experienced pipeline engineer

You will learn to:

Design a subsea pipeline and to manage pipeline integrity

Who should attend?
Engineers and graduate students

Cost:

  • Member/Non-member: NOK1,660.00

Problems, Challenges and Remedies in the Estimation of Extreme Response Statistics for Offshore Structures

Course Title: Problems, Challenges and Remedies in the Estimation of Extreme Response Statistics for Offshore Structures
Date: Sunday, June 25, 2017
Time: 10:00 am – 4:30 pm
Instructors: Professor Arvid Naess

Bio:

Dr. Arvid Naess is professor of Mathematical Statistics and Structural Engineering at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) in Trondheim, Norway. During the period 2003-2012, he was in the core group at the Center for Ships and Ocean Structures at NTNU, which was a Center of Excellence in Research. His main research focus over the last decades has been on developing methodologies for safety and reliability assessment of structural systems in marine and civil engineering. An important component of this activity has been development of methods for robust and accurate estimation of extreme values based on data. He recently co-authored (with Professor Torgeir Moan) the book Stochastic Dynamics of Marine Structures.

Course description

 

The estimation of extreme value statistics related to offshore engineering provides many unique challenges to the safe design of structures designated for service in the harsh environment of offshore oil fields. If these challenges are not adequately addressed, it can lead to serious consequences in terms of structural failures.

This course provides an overview of the key elements in the estimation of extreme value statistics that is relevant for the design of dynamic offshore structures. It discusses the potential pitfalls and misconceptions that are rather widespread. Recently developed robust and accurate methods for extreme value prediction will be presented, and software for practical use will be discussed and demonstrated to give participants hands on experience.

Course Outline

  • Problems inherent in classical asymptotic extreme value statistics.
  • The popular peaks-over-threshold method: Limitations and problems for practical prediction of extreme values.
  • The extreme value distribution based on the average upcrossing rate: Why is this often a robust and accurate approximation? When is it not applicable?
  • The ACER method for extreme value analysis. This method provides a nonparametric representation of the exact extreme value distribution that is given by the data. Works both for stationary and non-stationary data.
  • A practical extreme value prediction approach based on the ACER method.
  • Use of computer program for prediction of extreme values based on the ACER method.
  • Long term extreme value analysis. Typical approaches and approximations versus the correct formulation.

You will learn to:

The primary course learning objective is to provide basic understanding of the key issues involved in the estimation of extreme values based on measured or simulated response time series. Following this course, the attendees should be able to:

  • Understand the limitations and pitfalls in the standard approaches based on asymptotic analyses using the generalized extreme value distributions.
  • Understand the limitations and pitfalls in the popular peaks-over-threshold approach to extreme value prediction.
  • Know how to formulate the extreme value distribution based on the average upcrossing rate and its limitations.
  • Know how to use the ACER method for accurate prediction of extreme values when the amount of data available allows for this.
  • Use the ACER method as a diagnostic tool for the effect of data dependence.
  • Understand how to formulate long term statistics correctly.

Who should attend?
This course is aimed at the engineer and researcher who would like to develop his/her personal skills in carrying out extreme value analyses and predictions in a sound manner based on understanding and robust methodologies.

Cost:

  • Member/Non-member: NOK1,660.00

Structural response monitoring of ice-going vessels - CANCELED

Course Title: Structural response monitoring of ice-going vessels
Date: Thursday, June 29, 2017
Time: 1:00 pm – 5:00 pm
Instructors: Håvard Nyseth, DNV GL, Johan Johansson Iseskär, DNV GL, and Anders Hansson, DNV GL

Bio:

Håvard Nyseth holds a MSc in Marine Technology from NTNU (Trondheim) and is currently working in the “Structures” section within the DNV GL Technical Advisory unit in Norway. His core competence is within the area of structural safety of vessels and offshore structures, ranging from plan approval, rule development, R&D, design verification and technical consultancy projects. His two main responsibilities are related to production, transportation, and storage of liquefied gas, particularly in the area of safety of hull structure and containment systems, and design and operational aspects of ships operating in ice covered waters.

Håvard is part of the group within DNV GL Maritime focusing on cold climate shipping, which have coordinated the arctic maritime activities related to R&D, JIPs, rule development and maintenance (ice class and winterization), class support, and external projects. He holds currently several positions in international research programs related to ships operating in polar areas.

Johan Johansson Iseskär joined DNV GL 2006 then working as an approval engineer within Machinery Class where he was group leader for driven units. Johan has background as able seaman sailing two years as motorman on expeditions between Gothenburg and Svalbard, as well as industry experience as Research and Development Engineer for CP propulsion systems for six years at Berg Propulsion.

Johan also has leadership experience as former Head of Section at DNV Technical Advisory, Machinery and systems, where he is now a Principal Engineer working with trouble-shooting, design consultancy, design verification, technology qualification, R&D, assessments, Root Cause Investigations etc.

Anders Hansson joined DNV GL in 2008 working as an approval engineer within Machinery Class, mainly working with driven unites (Thrusters, Propellers, Water Jets, Steering Gears, Shafting, etc), and were involved in the development of the new Polar Ice rules with regard to fatigue and strength of ice loads on propeller blades and CP-mechanisms.

Anders is now working in the Technical Advisory, section for Machinery and Systems, and is heavily involved with field testing, on side measurements and analyses both for verification of newbuilding and trouble shooting for vessels in operation.

Course description

  • Background and application of ice response monitoring systems
  • Summary of existing monitoring systems for ships operating in ice covered waters
  • Description of structural monitoring system components and arrangement
  • Practical example case, including setup, arrangement, operational experience, and results

Course Outline

Navigating ships in cold areas and in ice-covered waters pose additional risk elements and challenges beyond what normally apply to world wide shipping operation. One of the most obvious risk elements comes from the increased loading on the ship hull and the propulsion system due to ice impacts, imposing additional requirements to the design of the hull, machinery and the appendices attached to the vessel. However, the ice classes assigned by Classification Societies, on which the strengthening of the vessel is based, provide limited guidance in characterizing the ship’s structural strength and operational limits for actual operational modes in ice. One of the main challenges when operating vessels in ice covered waters is to ensure that the vessel is operated within the actual capabilities.

Full scale measurements of structural response to ice are considered key factors in understanding and managing risks in ice operation, including the potential of damaging the hull and propulsion system due to ice impacts. Measurement systems being part of a more comprehensive decision support tool may reduce these risks elements by providing real time information about the actual environment in which the vessel is operating.

The International Maritime Organization (IMO) is now introducing new regulations for Polar shipping, with the goal of providing “safe ship operation and the protection of the polar environment by addressing risks present in polar waters and not adequately mitigated by other instruments of the Organization”. The IMO Polar Code includes requirements to ensure that the operators have risk based procedures for monitoring and maintaining safety during operation in ice. Full scale measurements are believed to be an essential and important tool in terms of documenting the actual performance of the vessel and to ensure safe and efficient operation in ice.

DNV GL has during the last decade invested in and developed an unique data base from full scale measurements of ice-going ships. DNV GL will focus on how theoretical state of the art modelling can be utilized for practical application of measurement technology to ensure safe and efficient operation of ships in ice covered waters.

You will learn to:

Get insight into DNV GLs experience with full scale measurements on ice going ships, including applicability, opportunities, and limitations, as well as the practical application combined with theoretical state of the art modeling.

Who should attend?
Engineers and graduate students

  • Ship operators
  • Ship designers
  • Ship builders
  • Academia working with ships and structures in Arctic

Cost:

  • Member/Non-member: NOK1,660.00

2017 Short Course Specials!

As an experiment to encourage continuing education, the OOAE Division is
subsidizing the 2017 OMAE Short Courses.

Funding for instructors and a substantial reduction in course fees are being provided!

Sign Up Today!

To ensure space availability, please register for your short courses by June 11th.