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Guy M. Genin, Ph.D..

Guy M. Genin, Ph.D.
Guy M. Genin, Ph.D.

ASME member Guy M. Genin, Ph.D., professor of mechanical engineering and materials science in the School of Engineering & Applied Science at Washington University in St. Louis, was recently named a Fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. Dr. Genin was recognized for leadership in and outstanding contributions to the mechanics of bi-material attachment in nature, physiology and engineering, according to his Fellow citation. Nominated by ASME members and Fellows, ASME members must have 10 or more years of active practice and at least 10 years of active corporate membership in the Society to become an ASME Fellow. A member of the Washington University faculty since 1999, Genin’s research focuses on the role of force in living systems. His team is currently investigating pathologies with underlying mechanical components, such as cardiac fibrosis and pathologies of interfaces in the body. He is also studying interfaces within plants that could lead to methods for manipulating plants by employing mechanical force, and is the principal investigator for a five-year, $25 million National Science Foundation Science and Technology Center project in this area. Genin, who was also recently named a Fellow of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering, is the recipient of a number of awards, including a Research Career Development Award from the National Institutes of Health, the Yangtze River Scholar Award from the Chinese Ministry of Education, and ASME’s Richard Skalak Award for best paper published in the ASME Journal of Biomechanical Engineering. Genin received a bachelor’s degree in civil engineering from Case Western Reserve University in 1990, as well as a master’s degree in engineering mechanics from the university in 1992. He earned both a master’s degree in engineering mechanics and a Ph.D. in solid mechanics from Harvard University in 1993 and 1997, respectively.

 

Hanqing Jiang, Ph.D..

Hanqing Jiang, Ph.D..
Hanqing Jiang, Ph.D..

ASME member Hanqing Jiang, Ph.D., associate professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering at Arizona State University, was recently named a Fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. The ASME Committee of Past Presidents confers the Fellow grade of membership on worthy candidates to recognize their outstanding engineering achievements. Dr. Jiang had made significant contributions to flexible electronics and stretchable batteries. His current research focuses on multiphysics modeling and experiments for heterogeneous hard and soft materials, specifically on combined elastomeric materials with thin films for strain sensors, silicon thin films on soft substrates as anodes for lithium-ion batteries, and integrated gels and electronics. Currently the chair of the ASME Applied Mechanics Division’s Mechanics of Soft Materials Technical Committee, Jiang has published five book chapters and approximately 80 peer-reviewed journal papers. He was the recipient of a National Science Foundation Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) award in 2009 and the National Excellent Doctoral Dissertation Award of China in 2003. He earned a bachelor’s degree in engineering mechanics from China’s Dalian University of Technology in 1996. He received a Ph.D. in solid mechanics from Tsinghua University in Beijing, China, in 2001.

 

Bruce Farber, P.E.

Bruce Farber, P.E.
Bruce Farber, P.E.

ASME member Bruce Farber, P.E., of Oak View, Calif., received the ASME Channel Islands Section’s Engineer of the Year Award at the section’s 44th Annual Engineering Week Dinner and Awards Banquet, which was held Feb. 23 at California State University, Channel Islands in Camarillo, Calif. Farber, who is the director of business development and special products at Wiggins Lift Co. in Oxnard, Calif., was recognized by the section for his technical and professional achievements during his 37-year mechanical engineering career. Before joining Wiggins Lift Co. as a technical director, Farber previously worked at the Naval Civil Engineering Laboratory, Oceaneering Technologies, Allison Fitness, Hi-Temp Insulation, and Proactive Technologies. He has earned nine patents covering seawater hydraulic diver tools for the U.S. Navy, tennis racquet improvements to avert tennis elbow, an exercise chair for paraplegics and forklift safety technology. Farber has been a member of ASME since 1978, when he joined as an undergraduate at the University of California, Santa Barbara, and helped revive the university’s inactive student section. Farber received both a bachelor’s degree and a master’s degree in mechanical engineering from the University of California, Santa Barbara in 1979 and 1980, respectively. He is a licensed Professional Engineer in the state of California.

 

Xin Zhang, Ph.D

Xin Zhang, Ph.D
Xin Zhang, Ph.D.

ASME member Xin Zhang, Ph.D., professor of mechanical engineering and materials science and engineering in the College of Engineering (ENG) at Boston University, was recently named a Fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) fellow. Nominated by ASME members and Fellows, ASME members must have 10 or more years of active practice and at least 10 years of active corporate membership in the Society to become an ASME Fellow. Dr. Zhang was honored for her internationally recognized research using microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) to content with a wide range of critical problems in advanced materials, biomedicine and energy. A member of the Boston University faculty since 2002, Zhang leads an interdisciplinary team of researchers focused on fundamental and applied aspects of MEMS and nanotechnology. Her research group — the Laboratory for Microsystems Technology — seeks to understand and make use of interesting characteristics of micro/nanomaterials, micro/nanomechanics, and micro/nanomanufacturing technologies with progressive engineering efforts and practical applications ranging from energy to health care to homeland security. Zhang, who was named ENG’s inaugural Distinguished Faculty Fellow in 2009, was the recipient of the National Science Foundation Faculty CAREER Award in 2003. She has participated in U.S. and international National Academy of Engineering symposia, and has published more than 130 papers in interdisciplinary journals. She received her Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from Hong Kong University of Science and Technology in 1998.

 

Laine Mears, Ph.D., P.E.

Laine Mears, Ph.D., P.E.
Laine Mears, Ph.D., P.E.

ASME member Laine Mears, Ph.D., P.E., the BMW SmartState Chair in Automotive Manufacturing and professor at the International Center for Automotive Research at Clemson University (CU-ICAR), was recently named a Fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. Nominated by ASME members and Fellows, ASME members must have 10 or more years of active practice and at least 10 years of active corporate membership in the Society to become an ASME Fellow. Dr. Mears, who is currently developing a collaboration between Clemson University engineers and Greenville Technical College students to work on a prototype vehicle assembly line, joined Clemson’s automotive engineering faculty in 2006 as a founding member of the university’s automotive graduate program and an assistant professor at the CU-ICAR campus in Greenville, S.C. He teaches modeling and analysis of automotive manufacturing processes and automation integration in manufacturing, and has performed research in intelligent machining systems, manufacturing process control and manufacturing equipment diagnostics. Prior to joining the Clemson faculty, he had 10 years of industry experience with SKF Bearings and Hitachi Unisia Automotive. Mears, who is a member of the ASME Manufacturing Engineering Division Executive Committee, was the recipient of a National Science Foundation CAREER Award in 2010. He received a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering from Virginia Tech in 1993. He received both a master’s degree and Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from Georgia Tech in 2001 and 2006, respectively.

 

Christophe Pierre, Ph.D.,

Christophe Pierre, Ph.D.,
Christophe Pierre, Ph.D.

ASME Fellow Christophe Pierre, Ph.D., provost and vice president for academic affairs at Stevens Institute of Technology, has been named a Fellow of the prestigious National Academy of Inventors (NAI). He will be inducted as an NAI Fellow at the Sixth Annual Conference of the NAI on April 6 at the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum in Boston. According to the academy, election as an NAI Fellow is a notable professional distinction conferred upon academic inventors who have demonstrated “a prolific spirit of innovation in creating or facilitating outstanding inventions that have made a tangible impact on quality of life, economic development and welfare of society.” A world renowned leader in the fields of vibrations, structural dynamics and nonlinear dynamics, Dr. Pierre has made significant contributions to research in many areas of mechanical and aerospace engineering, including the dynamics of complex large-scale structural systems, and has been acknowledged for his innovative work on mode localization in disordered structures. At Stevens Institute, Pierre is responsible for the university’s academic integrity and all programs and administrative offices related to the academic operation, and for long-range academic strategic planning, resource allocation and new initiatives. He also leads the university’s cross-disciplinary initiatives to enhance its teaching and research endeavors and serves as a professor in the mechanical engineering department. He has authored or co-authored more than 120 research articles for refereed journals. Pierre was the winner of ASME’s N. O. Myklestad Award in 2005 in recognition of his research in the area of vibration localization. He received a bachelor’s degree in aerospace engineering in 1982 from École Centrale des Arts et Manufactures de Paris in France, a master’s degree in mechanical and aerospace engineering from Princeton University in 1983, and a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering and materials science from Duke University in 1985.

 

Alexander L. Brown, Ph.D.

Alexander L. Brown, Ph.D.
Alexander L. Brown, Ph.D.

ASME member Alexander L. Brown, Ph.D., an R&D engineer and Principal Member of the Technical Staff at Sandia National Labs in Albuquerque, N.M., was recently named an ASME Fellow by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. Nominated by ASME members and Fellows, ASME members must have 10 or more years of active practice and at least 10 years of active corporate membership in the Society to become an ASME Fellow. Dr. Brown was recognized by the Society for his experimental and modeling technical contributions, which include significant advancements in the areas of computational fire dynamics, code coupling, liquid dynamics, plume dispersion, pyrolysis, and thermochemical biomass fuels. Brown supports system qualification activities that make up a significant portion of the fire science efforts at Sandia’s Fire and Aerosol Sciences Dept. 1532. His improvements in code and model development, simulation analysis, and experimental testing have enabled him to make important contributions to fire phenomenology and basic energy technologies. His research has also contributed to the executive launch approval for sending special nuclear material into space, assembled prior to the launch of the Mars Science Laboratory rover in 2011. He has served for approximately 10 years as an expert reviewer for nuclear power plant fire assessments through recurring contracts from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and continues to conduct research related to biomass thermochemical processing, primarily through projects funded by the New Mexico Small Business Assistance Program. Brown, who has published approximately 100 articles in peer-reviewed conference proceedings and journals, is an associate editor for the ASME Journal of Thermal Science and Engineering Applications. He received his doctorate in mechanical engineering from the University of Colorado at Boulder in 2001.

 

Mark Gurvich, Ph.D.

Mark Gurvich, Ph.D.
Om Sharma (left), senior fellow at the United Technologies Research Center and one of four ASME Fellows who sponsored Mark Gurvich’s Fellow nomination, presents Dr. Gurvich with his ASME Fellow certificate.

ASME member Mark Gurvich, Ph.D., a technical fellow at United Technologies Research Center (UTRC) in East Hartford, Conn., was recently named a Fellow by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. The ASME Committee of Past Presidents confers the Fellow grade of membership on worthy candidates to recognize their outstanding engineering achievements. Gurvich, an expert in composite materials, joined UTRC in 2002 and is currently focused on advanced materials and structures for numerous applications of composites and polymers throughout the UTC business units Pratt & Whitney, UTC Aerospace Systems, Otis, and until recently, Sikorsky. Dr. Gurvich manages UTRC’s efforts to address issues of structural integrity, including efficient computational modeling, reliability and probabilistic assessment, and experimental methods for mechanical evaluation and characterization. In addition, Gurvich has been leading or co-leading UTRC composites research efforts sponsored by the Army Aviation Applied Technology Directorate (AATD), the Office of Naval Research (ONR), NASA and the National Rotorcraft Technology Center (NRTC). Before joining the research center, Gurvich served as a senior scientist/engineer at Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co., visiting scientist at the Institute of Materials Science at the University of Connecticut, Fulbright Scholar at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, and associate professor at Riga Technical University in Latvia, where he received his Ph.D. in mechanical engineering.

 

Harri K. Kytömaa, Ph.D., P.E.

Harri K. Kytömaa, Ph.D., P.E.
ASME Past President Julio Guerrero (left) presented Harri Kytömaa, Ph.D., P.E., with his ASME Fellow certificate during a visit to the Exponent office in Natick, Mass., in January 2017.

ASME member Harri K. Kytömaa, Ph.D., P.E., group vice president and principal engineer at the engineering and scientific consulting firm Exponent, was recently named a Fellow of ASME. Nominated by ASME members and Fellows, ASME members must have 10 or more years of active practice and at least 10 years of active corporate membership in the Society to become an ASME Fellow. ASME Past President Julio Guerrero, who was visiting the Exponent office in Natick, Mass., to give a presentation on R&D collaborations, presented Dr. Kytömaa with his Fellow certificate following the speech. A specialist in mechanical engineering and the analysis of thermal and flow processes, Kytömaa applies his expertise to mechanical systems and processes and to the prevention and investigation of associated failures. He was a pioneer in the field of acoustics modeling of drilling fluid filled piping systems for acoustic telemetry and Measurement-While-Drilling, one of the technologies that facilitated directional drilling. He has also developed ultrasonic techniques for both medical and engineering applications, including instrumentation for flow measurement and the characterization of dense suspensions. Kytömaa previously served as assistant professor and associate professor of mechanical engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he led the fluid mechanics laboratory, and held positions as visiting professor at the Helsinki University of Technology and at the DOE Pacific Northwest Laboratory in Washington, and as a lecturer at Worcester Polytechnic Institute. He was the recipient of the ASME Lewis F. Moody Award for best paper in 1993 for his work on acoustics and two-phase flows.

 

Arthur G. Erdman, Ph.D., P.E.

Arthur G. Erdman, Ph.D., P.E.
Arthur G. Erdman, Ph.D., P.E.

ASME Fellow Arthur G. Erdman, Ph.D., P.E., professor of mechanical engineering at the University of Minnesota, member of the university’s Institute for Engineering in Medicine (IEM) Executive Committee and director of the IEM-affiliated Medical Devices Center, was selected as the recipient of the 2017 ASME Savio L-Y Woo Translational Biomechanics Medal. The award, which was established in 2015, is bestowed upon an individual who has translated meritorious bioengineering science to clinical practice through research, education, professional development, and with service to the bioengineering community. Examples of meritorious activity could include basic bioengineering science that translates into a medical device or equipment, contributes to new approaches of disease treatment, or establishes new injury treatment modalities. Dr. Erdman will be presented with the medal at the 2017 Summer Biomechanics, Bioengineering and Biotransport Conference, to be held from June 21 to 24 in Tucson, Ariz. Erdman is the Richard C. Jordan Professor and a Morse Alumni Distinguished Teaching Professor of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Minnesota, specializing in mechanical design, bioengineering and product design. His research includes a number of ongoing projects related to biomedical engineering and medical device design, including leading the effort to create LINCAGES, a mechanism software design package that is used throughout the world. An ASME member for more than 45 years, Erdman has served in a number of Society positions, including chair of the Design Engineering Division, chair of the Fluid Power Systems and Technology Division, chair of the Bioegineering Division, chair of the Joint Committee on Design and editor of the Journal of Medical Devices. He has been the recipient of the ASME Dedicated Service Award, the Machine Design Award and the Gustus L. Larson Memorial Award.

 

Timothy W. Simpson, Ph.D.

Timothy W. Simpson, Ph.D.
Timothy W. Simpson, Ph.D.

ASME Fellow Timothy W. Simpson, Ph.D., one of the United States’ leading experts in additive manufacturing technology and the design of 3D printed metal parts, was recently appointed as the Paul Morrow Professor in Engineering Design and Manufacturing at Pennsylvania State University’s College of Engineering. The Morrow Professorship is intended to “support the scholarly activities of a professor in the College of Engineering to develop strong relationships with industry by assisting the industrial community in meeting its applied research needs and providing a communication link between the university and industry,” according to Amr Elnashai, the Harold and Inge Marcus Dean of Engineering at Penn State. Dr. Simpson, a professor of mechanical engineering, industrial engineering, engineering design and architecture, teaches courses on mechanical engineering design, industrial systems design, additive manufacturing and product family design. He is co-director of the Penn State Center for Innovative Materials Processing through Direct Digital Deposition (CIMP-3D) and he also assists in the supervision of the Engineering Design and Optimization Group within the university’s mechanical and nuclear engineering department. Simpson is widely recognized throughout the country for his work in 3D printing. He has spoken at many industry events and conferences on the topic and his work has been published in both scholarly journals and mainstream publications. Simpson has been the recipient of several awards including the ASME Ben C. Spark Award in 2014, the American Society of Engineering Education Merryfield Design Award in 2011, and the University and College Designers Association Excellence in Design Award in 2011. An active member of ASME throughout his nearly 25 years of membership, Simpson helped launch the ASME Innovative Additive Manufacturing 3D (IAM3D) Challenge and helped coordinate and launch ASME’s Additive Manufacturing + 3D Printing Conference & Expo (AM3D). Simpson received a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering from Cornell University in 1994. He received a master’s degree and a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from Georgia Institute of Technology in 1995 and 1998, respectively.

 

Çağlar Oskay Ph.D.

Çağlar Oskay Ph.D.
Çağlar Oskay Ph.D.

ASME member Çağlar Oskay Ph.D., an associate professor of civil and environmental engineering and mechanical engineering at Vanderbilt University, was recently named a Fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. Nominated by ASME members and Fellows, ASME members must have 10 or more years of active practice and at least 10 years of active corporate membership in the Society to become an ASME Fellow. Dr. Oskay was recognized by the Society for significant contributions including developing and implementing new multi-scale computational modeling and simulation tools for material and structural systems subjected to extreme environments and loading conditions, and training future generations of engineers to construct safer and more durable advanced composite aerospace and infrastructure materials and structures, according to his Fellow citation. Oskay is the director of Vanderbilt University’s Multiscale Computational Mechanics Laboratory, which focuses on computational characterization of the failure response of systems that involve multiple temporal and spatial scales. The lab’s researchers develop computational methodologies for failure and fragmentation of composite systems subjected to extreme loading conditions, including impact, blast and crushing loads, characterization of complex and hybrid composite systems, and analysis of multiphysics problems. Oskay is the current vice chair of the ASME Composite Materials Committee and vice chair elect of the ASME Committee on Computing in Applied Mechanics. He received a bachelor’s degree in civil engineering in 1998 from Middle East Technical University in Ankara, Turkey. He earned master’s degrees in applied mathematics and civil engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in 2000 and 2001, respectively. Oskay also received a Ph.D. in civil engineering from Rensselaer in 2003.

 

J. Robert Sims

J. Robert Sims
J. Robert Sims

ASME Past President and Fellow J. Robert Sims was recently elected to the board of directors of the American Association of Engineering Societies (AAES), a multidisciplinary organization of engineering societies dedicated to advancing the engineering profession’s impact on the public good. Sims, who was elected by the AAES board in November, began his three-year term as board member on Jan. 1. Sims, who served as ASME’s 133rd president from 2014-2015, is a senior engineering fellow at Becht Engineering Co. Currently a member the Nominating Committee, Sims has been an extremely active ASME volunteer during his more than 35 years as a member. He has served in a number of leadership positions, including Board of Governors member, senior vice president for Standards and Certification, member of the Industry Advisory Board, vice president for the Council on Codes and Standards, chair of the Board on Pressure Technology, as well as many ASME Codes and Standards boards, groups, committees and sub-committees. Sims was the recipient of the Melvin R. Green Codes and Standards Medal in 2006, the J. Hall Taylor Medal in 2004, and the ASME Dedicated Service Medal in 1995.

 

Dean Bartles, Ph.D.

Dean Bartles, Ph.D.
Dean Bartles, Ph.D.

ASME Fellow Dean Bartles, Ph.D., a technology development consultant at ASME who is helping the Society develop an organizational strategy focused on robotics and manufacturing, has been named to lead the Advanced Robotics Manufacturing Innovation Hub within the U.S. Department of Defense. In his role in the new center, Dr. Bartles will work with public and private partners to advance the practical application of robotics and automation in a wide range of manufacturing sectors with a focus on job creation. The Advanced Robotics Manufacturing Innovation Hub is a collaboration involving 123 companies, 40 academic institutions, and 64 government and nonprofit agencies in 31 states. ASME has selected robotics as one of five technologies to guide future programs within the organization and grow new markets. Bartles is the former chief manufacturing officer of UI LABS in Chicago, and the founding executive director of the Digital Manufacturing and Design Innovation Institute (DMDII). Prior to joining DMDII, he held several positions at General Dynamics and its predecessor companies, most recently serving as vice president and general manager of a key strategic business unit within the Ordnance and Tactical Systems division of General Dynamics. Bartles, a member of the ASME Industry Advisory Board, was the recipient of the M. Eugene Merchant Manufacturing Medal of ASME/SME in 2014.

 

Ali Khounsary, Ph.D.

Ali Khounsary, Ph.D
Ali Khounsary, Ph.D.

ASME Fellow Ali Khounsary, Ph.D., a professor at the Illinois Institute of Technology, was recently named a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). Election as an AAAS Fellow recognizes members whose efforts on behalf of the advancement of science or its applications in service to society have distinguished them among their peers and colleagues. Dr. Khounsary, a research professor of physics and member of the Center for Synchrotron Radiation Research and Instrumentation, was recognized for his contributions to the engineering and technology of third-generation synchrotron radiation sources, and to the heat transfer and x-ray optics communities. Khounsary’s area of expertise includes X-ray optics, X-ray techniques and instrumentation, optical engineering, thermal management, and optomechanical system design, development, and fabrication. Khounsary, who is also a Fellow of the International Society for Optics and Photonics (SPIE), holds several U.S. patents. He has served as an associate editor of the journal Optical Engineering and X-Ray Optics and Instrumentation, and is currently an associate editor of ASME’s Journal of Heat Transfer. He is a former member and chair of the Thomas A. Edison Patent Award Committee, a former member of the ASME Board of Research and Technology Development, and a former chair and vice chair of the ASME Center for Research and Technology Development’s Research Committee on Radiation Technologies. Khounsary received his bachelor’s degree in nuclear engineering from the University of London in 1979. He received two degrees from the University of Illinois: a master’s degree in energy engineering in 1981 and a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering in 1987.

 

Matthew Cavuto

Matthew Cavuto
Matthew Cavuto

ASME student member Matthew Cavuto, a senior at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, was recently selected as one of the winners of the 2017 Marshall Scholarship competition. The Marshall Scholarship program, which is sponsored by the British government, provides an opportunity for outstanding American students to pursue two years of graduate study in any field at a university in the United Kingdom. Each year, the program awards up to 40 scholarships. The winners are selected based on academic merit, leadership potential, and ambassadorial potential. Cavuto, from Skillman, N.J., is majoring in mechanical engineering with a concentration in biomechanics and biomedical devices. As a Marshall Scholar, Cavuto will take part in advanced prosthetic and assistive technology research during his two years studying at Imperial College London and Cambridge University. During his first year, Cavuto will pursue a master’s degree in biomedical engineering, with a concentration in neurotechnology, at Imperial College London. There, he will work with Timothy Constandinou on the SenseBack Project, an initiative to enable amputees to experience sensory feeling through their prostheses. In his second year, he will pursue a Master of Philosophy degree in engineering at Cambridge University, under the supervision of Fumiya Iida in the Bio-Inspired Robotics Laboratory, designing assistive technologies and exoskeletons. Cavuto’s plans then include earning a Ph.D. in biomechatronics and, ultimately, designing the world’s first successful robotic exoskeleton.

 

Ashwani K. Gupta, Ph.D.

Ashwani K. Gupta, Ph.D.
Ashwani K. Gupta, Ph.D.

ASME Honorary Member Ashwani K. Gupta, Ph.D., a distinguished university professor of mechanical engineering at the University of Maryland (UMD), has been named a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). Dr. Gupta was recognized by AAAS for his distinguished contributions to combustion, propulsion, energy and environment sustainability, and for his contributions to education and outreach training and education, and services to industry. Gupta has been a faculty member at UMD since 1983, following six years at Massachusetts Institute of Technology as a member of the research staff in the Energy Laboratory and chemical engineering department and three years at Sheffield University as an independent research worker and research fellow in the department of chemical engineering and fuel technology. During his more than 40 years of combustion engineering research, Gupta has contributed to the fundamental understanding of high temperature air combustion called HiTAC, which has been proven effective in improving the cost efficiency of industrial furnaces while reducing air and noise pollution. Gupta, who received Honorary Membership in ASME last month at the ASME International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition in Phoenix, is a dedicated member of the ASME community, currently serving as chair of the Power Division’s Fuels and Combustion Technologies (FACT) Committee. He previously served as chair of the Fuels and Combustion Technology Division, chair of the Computers and Information in Engineering (CIE) Division, member of the CIE Executive Committee, and member of the Society’s Fellow Selection Committee. Gupta, an ASME Fellow, has received a number of Society awards during his more than 25 years as an ASME member, including the George Westinghouse Gold Medal, the James Harry Potter Gold Medal, the James N. Landis Medal, the Worcester Reed Warner Medal, the Holley Medal and the Melville Medal.

 

Roger V. Gonzalez, Ph.D., P.E.

Roger V. Gonzalez, Ph.D., P.E.
Roger V. Gonzalez, Ph.D., P.E.

ASME member Roger V. Gonzalez, Ph.D., P.E., chair and professor of the department of engineering leadership at the University of Texas at El Paso and founder and CEO of LIMBS, an El Paso-based nonprofit prosthetics developer, was recently named a Fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. Nominated by ASME members and Fellows, ASME members must have 10 or more years of active practice and at least 10 years of active corporate membership in the Society to become an ASME Fellow. Dr. Gonzales’ organization LIMBS is dedicated to providing amputees in undeveloped areas throughout the world with low-cost prosthetic devices. The organization offers prosthetics in more than 40 countries throughout Africa, Asia, Europe and Latin America, where Gonzalez’s team works with students, professionals and key international partners on international engineering and humanitarian projects. In addition to founding LIMBS, Gonzalez has led the design, development and implementation of the nation’s first Bachelor of Science degree program in engineering leadership at the University of Texas at El Paso. He received a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering from the University of Texas at El Paso in 1986. He received both a master’s degree in biomedical engineering and a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from The University of Texas at Austin in 1990 and 1994, respectively.


Mun Y. Choi, Ph.D

Mun Y. Choi, Ph.D
Mun Y. Choi, Ph.D

ASME Fellow Mun Y. Choi, Ph.D., the current provost and executive vice president at the University of Connecticut, has been selected as the next president of the four-campus University of Missouri System, which includes Missouri S&T, following a nearly year-long search. When Dr. Choi’s appointment as the University of Missouri System president takes effect March 1, he will become the system’s first Asian-American president. Since 2012, he has overseen UConn’s budget of $700 million while working with 1,500 full-time faculty, 31,000 students and 2,000 staff across 12 schools and colleges including the Schools of Medicine, Dental Medicine and Law. During his tenure at UConn, Choi has worked closely with the university’s leaders, trustees, Connecticut Governor Daniel Malloy and members of the Connecticut legislature to develop and implement the framework for the $1.5 billion Next Generation Connecticut program, which aims to increase enrollment at UConn by 5,000 students, add 300 new faculty, increase research expenditures and create industry partnerships to create high-paying jobs within the state. Prior to serving as provost and executive vice-president, Choi was dean of engineering at UConn from 2008 to 2012. Before that, he served as department head of mechanical engineering and mechanics at Drexel University, and as assistant and associate professor at the University of Illinois at Chicago. He was a member of the ASME Mechanical Engineering Department Heads Committee from 2002 to 2008. Choi graduated from the University of lllinois at Urbana-Champaign with a bachelor’s degree in general engineering in 1987. He went on to earn a master’s degree and a Ph.D. in mechanical and aerospace engineering from Princeton University in 1989 and 1992, respectively.



Patsy Brackin, Ph.D., P.E

Patsy Brackin, Ph.D., P.E
Patsy Brackin, Ph.D., P.E

ASME member Patsy Brackin, Ph.D., P.E., mechanical engineering professor and director of the new engineering design program at Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology, was recently named a Fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. Nominated by ASME members and Fellows, ASME members must have 10 or more years of active practice and at least 10 years of active corporate membership in the Society to become an ASME Fellow. A member of the Rose-Hulman faculty since 1995, Dr. Brackin teaches undergraduate courses in design and creativity as well as the senior-year capstone sequence. Her interest in design, sustainability and curriculum development motivated Brackin to help develop Rose-Hulman’s Home for Environmentally Responsible Engineering (HERE) program, an interdisciplinary freshman-year, hands-on approach to teaching students about sustainability and humanitarian engineering. She was also involved in the university’s Operation Catapult summer program, which introduces high-school students to the excitement of science and engineering, for 20 years. She was director of the program for 11 years. Brackin currently serves as the chair of ASME’s Graduate Teaching Fellowship Committee, a member of the Committee on Engineering Accreditation and an alternate for the Nominating Committee. Her previous Society positions included member of the ASME Scholarship Committee, program evaluator and commissioner for the Committee on Engineering Accreditation, and member of the Nominating Committee. She received the ASME Dedicated Service Award in 2015. Brackin earned both a bachelor’s degree and a master’s degree in mechanical engineering from the University of Tennessee in 1974 and 1975, respectively. She received a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from Georgia Institute of Technology in 1995.



Daniel Attinger, Ph.D.

Daniel Attinger, Ph.D.
Daniel Attinger, Ph.D.

ASME member Daniel Attinger, Ph.D., associate professor of mechanical engineering at Iowa State University, was recently named a Fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. Dr. Attinger was recognized as “an inspiring and recognized research leader in the field of multiphase microfluidics.” Nominated by ASME members and Fellows, ASME members must have 10 or more years of active practice and at least 10 years of active corporate membership in the Society to become an ASME Fellow. Attinger joined Iowa State as associate professor in 2011, after serving on the faculty of Columbia University and Stony Brook University. Attinger’s research focuses on multiphase microfluidics, which describes the dynamical behavior of several fluids or phases constrained by a micro-geometry. Multiphase microfluidics systems are typically multiscale, and feature multiple deforming interfaces. Attinger and his colleagues are working to understand and enhance multiphase microfluidic transport phenomena. His research, which has been funded by the National Science Foundation, the Department of Justice and the National Institute of Health, has applications in biology, manufacturing, bloodstain pattern analysis, advanced thermal management and energy transport. A former member of the ASME Nanoengineering Council, Attinger has received a number of honors, including the Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule (ETH) Zurich Medal for outstanding Ph.D. thesis in 2001, an NSF CAREER Award for young investigators in 2005, and the 2012 ASME International Conference on Nanochannels, Microchannels, and Minichannels (ICNMM) Outstanding Researcher Award. He received a bachelor’s and a master’s degree in mechanical engineering from Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Switzerland in 1997. He earned a Sc.D. degree in technical sciences from ETH Zurich in Switzerland in 2001.



Lian-Ping Wang, Ph.D.

Lian-Ping Wang, Ph.D.
Lian-Ping Wang, Ph.D.

ASME member Lian-Ping Wang, Ph.D., professor of mechanical engineering at the University of Delaware, was recently named a Fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) for “pioneering contributions to multiphase turbulent flows,” research that has generated innovative computational methods, led to new predictive tools for multiphase flow, and laid the foundation for the development of next-generation weather and climate models. The ASME Committee of Past Presidents confers the Fellow grade of membership on worthy candidates to recognize their outstanding engineering achievements. Dr. Wang, who joined the university in 1994, studies how finite-size particles interact with fluid turbulence, a fundamental process for many industrial and environmental applications such as fluidized bed reactor, spray atomization, plankton life cycle in ocean water, sediment transport, warm rain initiation, volcanic ash eruption, dust storm, and sea spray. He develops rigorous computational methods to probe and quantify particle-turbulence interactions and delivers physical models based on his numerical experiments. Since 2003, Wang has been a regular visiting scientist to the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), a federally funded research and development center devoted to service, research and education in the atmospheric and related sciences. He was named an NCAR Faculty Fellow in 2005 and a NCAR Affiliate Scientist in 2014. In 2012, he was appointed Chang Jiang Visiting Professor at Huazhong University of Science and Technology in China. He was named an Invitation Fellow this year by the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science. Wang has published more than 100 journal papers covering computational methods, fluid mechanics and atmospheric sciences. He received a bachelor’s degree in applied mathematics and engineering mechanics from Zhejiang University in Hangzhou, China, and a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from Washington State University.



Ioannis Chasiotis, Ph.D.

Ioannis Chasiotis, Ph.D..,
Ioannis Chasiotis, Ph.D.

Ioannis Chasiotis, Ph.D., professor of aerospace engineering at the University of Illinois, was recently named a 2016 University of Illinois Faculty Scholar, an honor that highlights the university’s commitment to fostering excellence in teaching, scholarship and service by its faculty. The program provides funding for three years to advance the award winner’s scholarly activities. Dr. Chasiotis’ studies cover the mechanical reliability and fracture of microelectromechanical systems, thin film materials and high performance carbon and polymer nanofibers, and deformation and damage mechanics of heterogeneous materials at small scales. Since joining the university at its Urbana campus nearly 12 years ago, he has received several honors, including a prestigious 2008 Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE), which is the highest recognition the U.S. government bestows on young professionals at the outset of their independent research careers. An ASME Fellow, Chasiotis received both the ASME J.R. Hughes Young Investigator Award and the Society of Engineering Science Young Investigator Medal in 2011. He was also the recipient of the M. Hetényi Award for Best Research Paper and the A.J. Durelli Award from the Society for Experimental Mechanics in 2010 and 2013, respectively. In 2007, he received both a National Science Foundation CAREER Award and a Young Investigator Award from the Office of Naval Research. Since January, Chasiotis has served as editor-in-chief of the journal Experimental Mechanics, the field’s leading journal. He has published chapters in five books, and more than 60 articles in peer-reviewed journals on his research in experimental mechanics at the micro and the nanoscale. After earning a bachelor’s degree in chemical engineering from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, in 1996, Chasiotis received a master’s degree and a Ph.D. in aeronautics from the California Institute of Technology in 1998 and 2002, respectively.



Afshin Ghajar, Ph.D., P.E.

Afshin Ghajar, Ph.D., P.E..,
Afshin Ghajar, Ph.D., P.E.

Afshin Ghajar, Ph.D., P.E., Regents Professor and John Brammer Endowed Professor in Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at Oklahoma State University, was recently named as the recipient of the 2016 ASME International Conference of Nanochannels, Microchannels, and Minichannels Conference (ICNMM) Outstanding Leadership Award. The award was presented to Dr. Ghajar during the conference, which was co-located with the Heat Transfer and Fluids Engineering Conferences in July in Washington, D.C. Ghajar, an ASME Fellow and longtime supporter of the ICNMM, was recognized for his exemplary support and significant contributions to the lasting success of the conference. Nominations are limited to professionals who have been involved with the conference for at least three years. Ghajar, who is an Honorary Professor at Xi’an Jiaotong University in China, was also the recipient of the 75th Anniversary Medal of the ASME Heat Transfer Division in 2013. Ghajar’s areas of research interest include two-phase flow heat transfer, heat transfer in mini- and microchannels, mixed convection heat transfer, and computational heat transfer and fluid mechanics. He and his colleagues have published more than 200 reviewed research papers, and he has delivered numerous keynote and invited lectures at major technical conferences and institutions. Ghajar is the recipient of three mechanical engineering degrees from Oklahoma State University: a bachelor’s degree, a master’s degree, and a Ph.D. He is a registered Professional Engineer in the state of Oklahoma.



Kenneth Means, Ph.D., P.E.

Kenneth Means, Ph.D., P.E.,
Michael Conzett (left), the 2015-2016 president of the National Council of Examiners for Engineering and Surveying, presents Kenneth Means with the 2016 NCEES Distinguished Examination Service Award for dedicated service to the council and the engineering profession.

ASME member Kenneth Means, Ph.D., P.E., of Morgantown, W. Va., was recently honored by the National Council of Examiners for Engineering and Surveying with the organization’s 2016 NCEES Distinguished Examination Service Award for his dedicated service to NCEES and the engineering profession. Means received the award at the council’s 95th annual meeting, held Aug. 24–27, in Indianapolis, Ind. Dr. Means, who is a professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering at West Virginia University, began volunteering with NCEES examination development in 1982, working primarily on the Fundamentals of Engineering exam. Two years later, he began working on the Principles and Practice of Engineering Mechanical exam. For the past 34 years, Means has continued to support engineering licensure exams and the mission of NCEES by writing many PE Mechanical exam items, participating in preliminary item analyses to assess the quality of exam items, and taking part in studies to update the exam specifications. He has served as chair of the PE Mechanical Committee and as chair and vice chair of the Mechanical Systems and Materials Module. Means was a member of the West Virginia State Board of Registration for Professional Engineers from 1981 to 1997, serving terms as president and vice president during this time. He was a member or consultant to the Committee on Examinations for Professional Engineers for eight terms and also served as vice chair. He served on several other NCEES committees during his board tenure, including the Committee on ABET and the ad hoc Committee on Office Automation, which worked to streamline the exam process to improve efficiency.



Richard S. Cowan, Ph.D., P.E.

Richard S. Cowan, Ph.D., P.E.,
Richard S. Cowan, Ph.D., P.E.

ASME member Richard S. Cowan, Ph.D., P.E., senior research scientist and director of the Laboratory for Extreme Tribology and Diagnostics at the Georgia Institute of Technology Manufacturing Institute, was recently named a Fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. Nominated by ASME members and Fellows, ASME members must have 10 or more years of active practice and at least 10 years of active corporate membership in the Society to become an ASME Fellow. Dr. Cowan has been a highly regarded project manager for more than 30 years as well as an advocate for the mechanical engineering profession, serving in a number of leadership positions including segment lead for the ASME Technical Events and Content Sector from 2014 to 2016, ASME’s appointed delegate to the International Tribology Council from 2011 to 2014, and an ASME Congressional Fellow in 1997, according to ASME Fellow Bharat Bhushan, Ohio Eminent Scholar and the Howard D. Winbigler Professor at Ohio State University, who prepared Cowan’s Fellow nomination. Currently a member of the ASME Nominating Committee, Cowan was the recipient of the ASME Dedicated Service Award in 2013 and the Donald F. Wilcock Award from the ASME Tribology Division in 2012 for distinguished service to the tribology community throughout his career. Before joining the Georgia Tech Manufacturing Institute, Cowan held engineering and management positions at TRW Bearings Division (currently SKF Aeroengine North America) and Cummins Engine Co. A registered professional engineer in the state of New York, Cowan received a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering from Rochester Institute of Technology in 1980. He earned both a master’s degree and a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from Georgia Tech in 1992 and 2002, respectively.



Daniel D. Frey, Ph.D.

Daniel D. Frey, Ph.D.,
Daniel D. Frey, Ph.D.

ASME Fellow Daniel D. Frey, Ph.D., professor of mechanical engineering at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, was recently appointed as the new faculty director of the MIT D-Lab, a program at the university that promotes the design and dissemination of technologies that could significantly improve the lives of people living in poverty. Dr. Frey was appointed by J. Kim Vandiver, MIT’s dean for undergraduate research, who had been serving as the lab’s faculty director. In his new role, Frey will work closely with D-Lab leadership and staff to advance the program's mission, values, ideals and culture. Frey has been an advocate for D-Lab since its beginning, having supervised or co-supervised 10 projects and establishing working relationships with its research and program staff, according to Amy Smith, D-Lab’s founder. With Frey’s assistance, D-Lab expects to further develop its research program while maintaining a focus on practical impact, genuine connection with communities, and respect for the creative capacity of people living in poverty. D-Lab’s current research and program portfolio includes biomass fuel and cookstoves, off-grid energy, mobile technology, local innovation, agricultural needs assessment, and developing world mobility. Frey will play a key role in coordinating D-Lab’s activities with other parts of the MIT by promoting faculty engagement in D-Lab courses, programs and research, and strengthening D-Lab’s alignment and collaboration with programs throughout the university. In addition to his role as D-Lab’s faculty director, Frey also serves as co-director of experimental design research in the Singapore University of Technology and Design-MIT International Design Center and as faculty advisor for the Comprehensive Initiative on Technology Evaluation, a consortium of six MIT partners that launched in 2012. Frey received a bachelor’s degree in aeronautical engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in 1987, a master’s degree in mechanical engineering from the University of Colorado in 1993, and a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from MIT in 1997.



Harold S. Park, Ph.D

Harold S. Park, Ph.D,
Harold S. Park, Ph.D

ASME member Harold S. Park, Ph.D., associate professor of mechanical engineering at Boston University, was recently named a Fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. Nominated by ASME members and Fellows, ASME members must have 10 or more years of active practice and at least 10 years of active corporate membership in the Society to become an ASME Fellow. Dr. Park’s research on computational nanomechanics and multiscale computational engineering has resulted in key contributions to the field of mechanical engineering. According to his award citation, Park’s work has demonstrated “the key roles that nanoscale surface effects have in controlling the plastic deformation mechanisms, novel physical properties and failure mechanisms of crystalline nanowires.” He has also developed new computational methods to use atomic theory to predict dynamic fracture pathways in brittle materials — knowledge that will facilitate the use of efficient computational methods “to tackle nanometer-scale mechanics phenomena with high accuracy,” according to the citation. Park’s research interests include computational nanomechanics; mechanics of two-dimensional nanostructures; mechanics of soft, active materials; long timescale atomistic modeling for proteins and amorphous solids; and coupled physics (electro and opto-mechanical) nanoscale phenomena. The current associate editor of the ASME Journal of Applied Mechanics, he is the recipient of a 2007 National Science Foundation CAREER award, a 2008 Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Young Faculty Award, the 2009 Gallagher Young Investigator Award from the United States Association for Computational Mechanics, and the 2012 ASME Sia Nemat-Nasser Early Career Award. He earned three mechanical engineering degrees at Northwestern University: a bachelor’s degree in 1999, a master’s degree in 2001, and a Ph.D. in 2004.



Marshall J. Norris, P.E.

Marshall J. Norris, P.E.,
Jason Vaughn (left), recipient of the South Carolina Society of Professional Engineers’ 2015 Engineer of the Year Award, presents Marshall Norris with the 2016 SCSPE Engineer of the Year Award.

ASME member Marshall J. Norris, P.E., of Greenville, S.C., was recently named the 2016 Engineer of the Year by the South Carolina Society of Professional Engineers (SCSPE). Norris was presented with the award at the 2016 South Carolina Engineering Conference and Trade Show, which was held in North Charleston, S.C., in June. Norris is a senior design engineer at Flour Enterprises Inc. in Greenville. As Fluor’s mechanical department unit organization manager, he is responsible for leading the process mechanical engineering portion of complex large and small projects, and works on both North American and international projects. In addition to being a member of ASME, Norris is also a member of the Project Management Institute, the National Society of Professional Engineers and SCSPE, where he is currently the president of the Piedmont Chapter. Norris also serves as treasurer of the SCSPE Educational Foundation. As an undergraduate at Clemson University, Norris received an award from ASME for outstanding contributions and service to the university’s mechanical engineering program. He received both a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering and a master’s degree in business administration from Clemson in 2001 and 2011, respectively. He is a registered professional engineer in the state of South Carolina.



Nikhil Koratkar, Ph.D.

Nikhil Koratkar
Nikhil Koratkar, Ph.D.

ASME member Nikhil Koratkar, Ph.D., the John A. Clark and Edward T. Crossan Professor of Engineering in Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute’s mechanical aerospace and nuclear engineering department, was recently named a Fellow of ASME. Nominated by ASME members and Fellows, ASME members must have 10 or more years of active practice and at least 10 years of active corporate membership in the Society to become an ASME Fellow. According to his Fellow citation from ASME, Dr. Koratkar, a recognized expert in nanomaterials, was recognized for his “exceptional achievement in the science and technology of one-dimensional (carbon nanotubes) and two-dimensional (graphene) nanomaterials, leading to important breakthroughs in nanotechnology, energy, and sustainability.” Koratkar’s research focuses on the synthesis, characterization and application of nanoscale materials, such as graphene, phosphorene, carbon nanotubes, and transition metal dichalcogenides, as well as metal and silicon nanostructures. He is currently investigating the fundamental mechanical, electrical, thermal, magnetic, and optical properties of these one- and two-dimensional materials. He is also developing a variety of composites, coating and device applications employing these low-dimensional materials. His research in the area of nanostructured materials for lithium-ion batteries led to the creation of a new startup, Ener-Mat Technologies, which intends to commercialize graphene electrodes for next-generation energy storage solutions. Koratkar has published more than 150 archival journal papers, and his publications have received nearly 10,000 citations. He is the recipient of a number of awards, including a National Science Foundation Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Award in 2004, the Electrochemical Society’s SES Young Investigator Award in 2009, and ASME’s Gustus L. Larson Memorial Award in 2015. He received a bachelor’s degree in aerospace engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology Bombay in 1995. He earned both a master’s degree and a doctorate in aerospace engineering from the University of Maryland in 1998 and 2001, respectively.



Dani Fadda, Ph.D.

Dani Fadda, Ph.D.
Dani Fadda, Ph.D.

ASME Fellow Dani Fadda, Ph.D., clinical associate professor of mechanical engineering in the Erik Jonsson School of Engineering and Computer Science at the University of Texas at Dallas, was recently named the 2016 ASME North Texas Section Engineer of the Year. The announcement was made at the North Texas Section’s Annual Awards Banquet on May 6. Recipients of the section’s Engineer of the Year Award must be current ASME North Texas Section members who have at least 12 years of work experience as a mechanical engineer (including doctoral work). The award recognizes career engineering accomplishment in mechanical engineering, service to the North Texas Section and participation in ASME activities. Honorees are selected based on their significant achievements in the field of mechanical engineering, including engineering management. Dr. Fadda, a former chair and vice chair of the North Texas Section’s Petroleum Technical Chapter, previously worked as a product manager for nuclear separation systems at Peerless Manufacturing Co. in Dallas. He has authored or co-authored numerous papers and holds multiple U.S. and international patents in the field of thermal sciences and separation. Fadda is the recipient of a number of professional awards, including the ASME Prime Movers Award in 2007, the ASME North Texas Section Young Engineer of the Year Award in 2000, and the ASME Petroleum Division Young Engineer of the Year Award in 1998. He is a licensed Professional Engineer in the state of Texas. He received a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering from the American University of Beirut, Lebanon, in 1991. He went on to earn two degrees from Southern Methodist University in Dallas: a master’s degree in mechanical engineering in 1993 and a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering in 1996.



Greg Walker, Ph.D.

Greg Walker
Greg Walker, Ph.D.

ASME member Greg Walker, Ph.D., associate professor of mechanical engineering at Vanderbilt University, was recently named a Fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. Nominated by ASME members and Fellows, ASME members must have 10 or more years of active practice and at least 10 years of active corporate membership in the Society to become an ASME Fellow. According to his Fellow citation from ASME, Dr. Walker’s significant contributions include the creation of new lines of scientific inquiry that have transformed the way many researchers think about energy conversion materials. His ground-breaking work in thermal rectification introduced a new direction in phonon engineering for cooling advanced microelectronic devices. His research interests include micro-scale heat transfer, heat flux measurement, energy transport processes, ultrasonic pyrometry, thermographic phospors, energy conversion devices, and high-performance computing. Walker has authored more than 50 journal publications and more than 60 conference papers with presentations, most of which focus on the areas of micro-scale energy transport in materials for direct energy conversion and thermographic phosphors for absolute, remote temperature sensing. A member of ASME for more than 20 years, he has been active in many activities during that time including serving as organizer for numerous technical conferences and as a reviewer for two ASME journals, the Journal of Heat Transfer and the Journal of Thermal Science and Engineering Applications. Walker received a bachelor’s degree and a master’s degree in mechanical engineering from Auburn University in 1990 and 1993, respectively. He received his Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University in 1997.



Michael R. Kessler, Ph.D.

Michael R. Kessler, Ph.D.
Michael R. Kessler, Ph.D.

ASME member Michael R. Kessler, Ph.D., Berry Family Director and Professor of Mechanical and Materials Engineering at Washington State University, was recently named a Fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. Nominated by ASME members and Fellows, ASME members must have 10 or more years of active practice and at least 10 years of active corporate membership in the Society to become an ASME Fellow. Dr. Kessler was recognized for contributions to the understanding and development of multifunctional materials and biorenewable polymers and composites. Kessler is also co-director of the university’s Center for Bioplastics and Biocomposites (CB2), the first industry and university cooperative research center dedicated to developing biologically based plastics. His team is currently working on a unique, shape-changing smart material that combines several abilities, including shape memory behavior, light-activated movement and self-healing behavior. Kessler joined Washington State University in 2013, after serving on the faculties of Iowa State University and the University of Tulsa. The author of more than 160 journal papers, Kessler is the recipient of a number of honors, including the National Science Foundation Faculty Early Career Development Program (CAREER) Award, the Army Research Office Young Investigator Program Award, the Air Force Office of Scientific Research Young Investigator Program Award, and the Elsevier Young Composites Researcher Award from the American Society for Composites. He received a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering from LeTourneau University in 1996. He received two degrees in theoretical and applied mechanics from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign: a master’s degree in 1998 and a Ph.D. in 2002.



Christophe Pierre, Ph.D.

Christophe Pierre, Ph.D.
Christophe Pierre, Ph.D.

ASME Fellow Christophe Pierre, Ph.D., vice president for academic affairs at the University of Illinois, has been selected as the next provost and vice president for academic affairs at Stevens Institute of Technology. Dr. Pierre will assume the new post on Sept. 1, succeeding current Provost George Korfiatis, who had held the position for the past nine years. In his new role, Pierre will be responsible for the academic integrity of the institution and all programs and administrative offices related to the academic operation, as well as for long-range academic strategic planning, resource allocation and new initiatives, according to the university. In addition, he will also lead the university’s cross-disciplinary initiatives to enhance its teaching and research endeavors and will hold a position as professor in the mechanical engineering department. At the University of Illinois, Pierre held the position of vice president of academic affairs since 2011 and served as professor of mechanical science and engineering at the university’s Urbana-Champaign campus. Previously, he had served as dean of engineering at McGill University in Montreal from 2005 through 2011 and as associate dean for academic programs and initiatives at the University of Michigan’s School of Graduate Studies from 1999 through 2005. An established leader in the fields of vibrations, structural dynamics and nonlinear dynamics, Pierre was the winner of ASME’s N. O. Myklestad Award in 2005 in recognition of his research in the area of vibration localization. Pierre received a bachelor's degree in aerospace engineering in 1982 from École Centrale des Arts et Manufactures de Paris in France, a master's degree in mechanical and aerospace engineering from Princeton University in 1983, and a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering and materials science from Duke University in 1985.



Yu Ding, Ph.D.

Yu Ding, Ph.D.
Yu Ding, Ph.D.

ASME member Yu Ding, Ph.D., the Mike and Sugar Barnes Professor of industrial and systems engineering at Texas A&M University, was recently named a Fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. Nominated by ASME members and Fellows, ASME members must have 10 or more years of active practice and at least 10 years of active corporate membership in the Society to become an ASME Fellow. Dr. Ding's expertise is in the area of systems informatics and quality and reliability engineering, with a research focus on wind energy and nanoimaging and nanoinformatics. He joined Texas A&M in 2001 as an assistant professor in the industrial and systems engineering department. Ding, who is also a Fellow of the Institute of Industrial and Systems Engineers and a senior member of the Institute of Electric and Electronics Engineers, is the recipient of a number of honors, including the Charles H. Barclay, Jr. ’45 Faculty Fellow Award from the Texas A&M College of Engineering in 2013, a Faculty Early Career Development Program (CAREER) Award from the National Science Foundation in 2004, and a Best Paper Award from the ASME Manufacturing Engineering Division in 2000. He received a bachelor’s degree in precision engineering from the University of Science and Technology of China in Anhui in 1993, followed by a master’s degree in precision instrumentation from Tsinghua University in Beijing, China, in 1996 and a master’s degree in mechanical engineering from Pennsylvania State University in 1998. He earned a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from the University of Michigan in 2001.



Mohammad Ayoubi, Ph.D

Mohammad Ayoubi, Ph.D
Mohammad Ayoubi, Ph.D

ASME member Mohammad Ayoubi, Ph.D., associate professor of mechanical engineering in the School of Engineering at Santa Clara University, was recently named a Fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. The ASME Committee of Past Presidents confers the Fellow grade of membership on worthy candidates to recognize their outstanding engineering achievements. Dr. Ayoubi was recognized for his significant engineering accomplishments in dynamics and control of aerospace vehicles, curriculum development, and service to the profession. Ayoubi, who joined Santa Clara University in 2008, is an expert in dynamics and control of aerospace vehicles. In addition to teaching undergraduate and graduate courses, he is the director of the Dynamics and Control Systems Laboratory, where undergraduates, graduate, and Ph.D. students advance modeling, simulation and control of aerospace and mechanical systems, focusing on theoretical investigation of highly complex and uncertain aerospace and mechanical systems. Ayoubi received a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering from Amirkabir University of Technology in Tehran, Iran, in 1991 and a master’s degree in aerospace engineering from Sharif University of Technology in Tehran in 1998. He received a Ph.D. in aeronautics and astronautics from Purdue University in 2007.



Je-Chin Han, Sc.D.

Je-Chin Han, Sc.D.
Je-Chin Han, Sc.D.

ASME Life Fellow Je-Chin Han, Sc.D., distinguished professor and holder of the Marcus C. Easterling Chair in the department of mechanical engineering at Texas A&M University, has been named the winner of the ASME Aircraft Engine Technology Award for 2016. The award, which was presented to Dr. Han during the ASME Turbo Expo in Seoul, South Korea, last month, recognizes sustained personal creative contributions to aircraft gas turbine engine technology. Han was honored for outstanding contributions to the field of air breathing propulsion through inspiring leadership, education and research. During the conference, Han also delivered the 2016 Aircraft Engine Technology Award Lecture, “Turbine Blade Cooling Research at Texas A&M 1980-2016.” Han, who joined the mechanical engineering faculty at Texas A&M in 1980 as an assistant professor, has been working on turbine blade cooling, film cooling and rotating coolant-passage heat transfer research for the past 40 years and has co-authored 220 journal papers. In addition, he is the lead author of the book Gas Turbine Heat Transfer and Cooling Technology and he has served as editor, associate editor and honorary board member for eight heat transfer-related journals. Han served as ASME K-14 Gas Turbine Heat Transfer Committee chair from 2004-2006 and ASME K-3 Heat Transfer Honors and Awards Committee chair from 2005-2006. He received the ASME Heat Transfer Memorial Award in 2002, the International Rotating Machinery Award in 2004, and the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Thermophysics Award in 2004. He received a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering from National Taiwan University in 1970. He earned a master’s degree in mechanical engineering from Lehigh University in 1973 and a Doctor of Science degree from Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1976.



Moshen Mosleh, Ph.D.

Moshen Mosleh, Ph.D.
Moshen Mosleh, Ph.D.

ASME member Moshen Mosleh, Ph.D., professor and director of the mechanical engineering graduate program at Howard University, was recently named a Fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. Nominated by ASME members and Fellows, ASME members must have 10 or more years of active practice and at least 10 years of active corporate membership in the Society to become an ASME Fellow. Dr. Mosleh also serves as the associate dean of research in the university’s College of Engineering and Architecture. For the past 20 years, Mosleh has contributed to the advancement of research in surface engineering and surface texturing, which has resulted in engineering solutions for automotive, aerospace, and medical applications. As a professor, he has profoundly contributed to the production of master and doctoral graduates among African-Americans and other under-represented populations over the past two decades, according to the university. He received both a bachelor’s and a master’s degree in mechanical Engineering from Amirkabir University of Technology in Tehran, Iran. He received a Ph.D. degree in mechanical engineering from MIT in 1996.



Rafael Davalos, Ph.D.

Rafael Davalos, Ph.D.
Rafael Davalos, Ph.D.

ASME member Rafael Davalos, Ph.D., a professor of biomedical engineering and primary investigator at the Bioelectromechanical Systems Lab in Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University’s College of Engineering, was recently named a Fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. Nominated by ASME members and Fellows, ASME members must have 10 or more years of active practice and at least 10 years of active corporate membership in the Society to become an ASME Fellow. Dr. Davalos’ widely recognized work in dielectrophoresis has led to innovations in cellular isolation and enrichment, making it possible to more specifically identify different types of cells in a diverse environment. Research led by Davalos has resulted in revolutionary developments in cancer treatment, early cancer detection and regenerative medicine. Davalos has published 84 peer-reviewed papers, book chapters and review articles. He has received multiple Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grants, and holds 14 patents that have been licensed to companies. Davalos received a bachelor’s degree in mechanical and aerospace engineering from Cornell University in 1994. He received two degrees from the University of California, Berkeley: a master’s degree in mechanical engineering in 1995 and a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering in 2002.



Yang Shi, Ph.D.

Yang Shi, Ph.D..
Yang Shi, Ph.D.

ASME member Yang Shi, Ph.D., professor and director of the undergraduate program in the mechanical engineering department at the University of Victoria in British Columbia, Canada, has been named a Fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. The ASME Committee of Past Presidents confers the Fellow grade of membership on worthy candidates to recognize their outstanding engineering achievements. Dr. Shi was recognized for being “an internationally leading scholar in networked and distributed control systems, and cyber-physical systems,” according to his Fellow citation. His research interests also include digital control, multirate control, system identification, multirate systems, autonomous vehicles, robotics, and their applications. Shi was inducted as a Fellow of Canadian Society for Mechanical Engineering in March 2016. He earned both a bachelor’s degree and a master’s degree in mechanical engineering and automatic control from Northwestern Polytechnical University in Xi'an, China, in 1994 and 1998, respectively. He received a Ph.D. in electrical and computer engineering from the University of Alberta in 2005.



Helen L. Reed, Ph.D.

Helen L. Reed, Ph.D.
Helen L. Reed, Ph.D.

ASME Fellow Helen L. Reed, Ph.D., a professor in the aerospace engineering department at Texas A&M University, has been selected to receive the prestigious 2016 Kate Gleason Award from ASME. The Kate Gleason Award, which was named after the first full member of the Society, was established in 2011 by the ASME Foundation to recognize the contributions of distinguished female leaders in the engineering profession. The award is intended to honor an individual female engineer who is a highly successful entrepreneur in a field of engineering, or someone who had a lifetime of achievement in the engineering profession. Dr. Reed is being recognized for her lifetime achievements in the fundamental understanding and control of boundary layer transition for high-efficiency aerospace vehicles and in pioneering small satellite design and implementation. Reed joined the Texas A&M faculty in 2004 and served as department head for four years before returning to teaching and research on a full-time basis. A member of the National Research Council’s Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board, Reed is widely regarded as an expert in hypersonics, energy efficient aircraft and small satellite design. She has received a number of professional awards and honors, including the Atwood Award from the American Society for Engineering Education and the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, and induction into the Academy of Engineering Excellence at her alma mater Virginia Tech University. She was named a 2013 Presidential Professor for Teaching Excellence at Texas A&M. Formal presentation of the Kate Gleason Award, which consists of a $2,000 honorarium, a bronze medal and a certificate, will take place during the Honors Assembly on Nov. 14 during the ASME Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition in Phoenix, Ariz..



John A. Judge, Ph.D.

John A. Judge, Ph.D.
John A. Judge, Ph.D.

ASME member John A. Judge, Ph.D., associate professor of mechanical engineering at the Catholic University of America, was recently named a Fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. Nominated by ASME members and Fellows, ASME members must have 10 or more years of active practice and at least 10 years of active corporate membership in the Society to become an ASME Fellow. Dr. Judge has made significant contributions in research and education, and has provided exceptional service and leadership to the mechanical engineering community. An expert in vibration and dynamics, with a research focus on mistuned rotors, micro-resonator arrays and laser vibrometry, Judge’s research interests are in the area of vibration and dynamics of complex structures, including vibration localization in near-periodic structures, resonant micro- and nano-mechanical systems (MEMS/NEMS), nonlinear dynamics, laser vibrometry and experimental characterization of systems using vibration and acoustics, and seismic/acoustic detection of landmines and improvised explosives. Prior to joining the Catholic University of America, he held a National Academy of Sciences Research Associateship at the Naval Research Laboratory in Washington, D.C. He is the author of 19 archival journal publications and the recipient of the CAREER Award from the National Science Foundation. Judge received a bachelor’s degree in mechanical and aerospace engineering from Cornell University in 1996 and two mechanical engineering degrees from the University of Michigan: a master’s degree in 1998 and a Ph.D. in 2002.



Robert Wagner, Ph.D.

Robert Wagner, Ph.D.
Robert Wagner, Ph.D.

ASME member Robert Wagner, Ph.D., director of the Fuels, Engines and Emissions Research Center at the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), was recently named a Fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. Nominated by ASME members and Fellows, ASME members must have 10 or more years of active practice and at least 10 years of active corporate membership in the Society to become an ASME Fellow. Dr. Wagner, who is also a faculty member of the Bredesen Center for Interdisciplinary Research and Graduate Education at the University of Tennessee at Knoxville, was recognized by ASME for his innovative research in advanced combustion concepts, unstable combustion phenomena and the scaling and harmonization of high-efficiency combustion concepts to application. His responsibilities at ORNL include the coordination and development of strategic internal and external collaborations at the laboratory to better support the mission of the DOE’s Vehicle Technologies Office. Wagner has been principal investigator on many research activities spanning low temperature combustion, unstable combustion fundamentals, nonlinear controls, thermodynamics, renewable fuels, and emissions characterization. He is the laboratory’s lead for the U.S.-China Clean Energy Research Center on Clean Vehicles and coordinates research spanning energy storage, renewable fuel technologies, advanced materials, and vehicle systems. The recipient of the 2014 ASME Internal Combustion Engine Award and a member of the ASME Internal Combustion Engine Division’s executive committee, Wagner has authored more than 100 technical publications and is on the editorial boards of three international journals. He received three degrees in mechanical engineering from the University of Missouri–Rolla: a bachelor’s degree in 1993, a master’s degree in 1995, and a Ph.D. in 1999.



Junmin Wang, Ph.D.

Junmin Wang, Ph.D.
Junmin Wang, Ph.D.

ASME member Junmin Wang, Ph.D., associate professor and founding director of the Vehicle Systems and Control Laboratory at Ohio State University, was recently named as a Fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. The ASME Committee of Past Presidents confers the Fellow grade of membership on worthy candidates to recognize their outstanding engineering achievements. Dr. Wang was recognized by the Society for his significant contributions to the mechanical engineering community through education and professional service, and for contributions to research such as the development of control and estimation methods for ground vehicle systems. Wang’s research interests include control, modeling, estimation and diagnosis of dynamical systems, specifically for conventional and electrified ground vehicles, sustainable mobility, and mechatronic systems. Prior to joining the Ohio State faculty in September 2008, Wang worked for five years at Southwest Research Institute in Texas. In addition to being an ASME Fellow, he is an Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Distinguished Lecturer and a Fellow of the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE). He is the recipient of a number of awards, including the National Science Foundation CAREER Award, the Ohio State University Harrison Faculty Award for Excellence, the SAE International Vincent Bendix Automotive Electronics Engineering Award, and the Office of Naval Research Young Investigator Award. Wang serves as an associate editor, technical editor, or editor for several journals including the ASME Journal of Dynamic Systems, Measurement and Control; the IEEE Transactions on Vehicular Technology; the IEEE/ASME Transactions on Mechatronics; and the SAE International Journal of Engines. He received a Bachelor of Engineering degree in automotive engineering and a master’s degree in power machinery and engineering from Tsinghua University in Beijing, China, in 1997 and 2000, respectively. He earned two additional masters degrees in electrical engineering and mechanical engineering from University of Minnesota, Twin Cities in 2003, and a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from University of Texas at Austin in 2007.



Harri K. Kytömaa, Ph.D., P.E.

Harri K. Kytömaa, Ph.D., P.E.
Harri K. Kytömaa, Ph.D., P.E.

ASME member Harri K. Kytömaa, Ph.D., P.E., corporate vice president and director of the thermal sciences practice at the engineering and scientific consulting firm Exponent, was recently named a Fellow of The American Society of Mechanical Engineers. Nominated by ASME members and Fellows, ASME members must have 10 or more years of active practice and at least 10 years of active corporate membership in the Society to become an ASME Fellow. Dr. Kytömaa specializes in mechanical engineering and the analysis of thermal and flow processes applied to the investigation and prevention of failures in mechanical systems and the determination of their cause and origin, and has decades of experience in the area of dynamics and thermal hydraulics of piping systems, valves and pipelines. Kytömaa pioneered the modeling of the acoustics of drilling fluid filled piping systems for acoustic telemetry and measurement-while-drilling (MWD), which was one of the enabling technologies for directional drilling. He also developed ultrasonic techniques for both medical and engineering applications, including instrumentation for flow measurement and the characterization of dense suspensions. Kytömaa was assistant professor and associate professor of mechanical engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, held positions as visiting professor at the Helsinki University of Technology and at the DOE Pacific Northwest Laboratory in Washington, and served as lecturer at the Worcester Polytechnic Institute. He received the Lewis F. Moody Award from the ASME Fluids Engineering Division in 1993 for best paper on a subject useful in engineering practice. Kytömaa received a bachelor’s degree in engineering science from Durham University in England in 1979. He received a master’s degree and Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from California Institute of Technology in 1981 and 1986, respectively.



Adrian S. Sabau, Ph.D.

Adrian S. Sabau, Ph.D..
Adrian S. Sabau, Ph.D.

ASME member Adrian S. Sabau, Ph.D., a senior research staff member in the Materials Science and Technology Division of the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory, was recently named as a Fellow of The American Society of Mechanical Engineers. The ASME Committee of Past Presidents confers the Fellow grade of membership on worthy candidates to recognize their outstanding engineering achievements. Dr. Sabau was honored for his significant accomplishments in advancing materials processing and materials development for energy applications based on integrated computational materials science and engineering. Sabau’s research interests include metal casting and materials behavior in harsh environments involving energy transport, fluid dynamics and continuum mechanics. He received two R&D 100 Awards, in 2009 and 2011, for innovations in process sciences. He has published more than 40 journal papers, 70 conference papers and has edited three books over the course of his career. Sabau received an engineering diploma in mechanical engineering and materials processing from the University of Craiova in Romania in 1992. He received a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from Southern Methodist University in 1996.



D. Yogi Goswami, Ph.D., P.E.

D. Yogi Goswami, Ph.D., P.E.
D. Yogi Goswami, Ph.D., P.E.

ASME Fellow D. Yogi Goswami, Ph.D., P.E., a Distinguished University Professor and the director of the Clean Energy Research Center at the University of South Florida, was recently named the 2016 winner of the Karl W. Böer Solar Energy Medal of Merit. The Böer Medal, which includes a $60,000 honorarium, recognizes an individual who has made significant pioneering contributions in solar energy, wind energy or other forms of renewable energy as an alternate source of energy through research, development or economic enterprise, or to an individual who has made extraordinary, valuable and enduring contributions to the field in other ways. Dr. Goswami is the 13th recipient of the medal, which is named in honor of Karl Wolfgang Böer, Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Physics and Solar Energy at the University of Delaware and founder of the Institute of Energy Conversion. Goswami, who was also recently selected as a 2016 inductee of the Florida Inventors Hall of Fame, served on the faculties of the University of Florida, North Carolina A&T State University, and Tuskegee Institute prior to joining the faculty at the University of South Florida. He also is a visiting professor at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich, Switzerland. Goswami has served in a number of Society leadership positions during his nearly 40 years as an ASME member, including Board of Governors member (2003-2006), senior vice president of the Council on Public Affairs (2000-2003), lecturer with the Distinguished Lecturers Program (2000-2003), and member of a variety of ASME committees. He has been recognized by the Society for his service with several awards, including the the Technical Communities Globalization Medal in 2013, the Frank Kreith Energy Medal in 2007, and the Dedicated Service Award in 1994. Goswami received a bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering at the University of Delhi, India, in 1969. He receved a master’s degree and a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from Auburn University in 1971 and 1975, respectively.



Martin Tanaka, Ph.D.

Martin Tanaka, Ph.D.
Martin Tanaka, Ph.D.

ASME member Martin Tanaka, Ph.D., was recently named a Fellow by The American Society of Mechanical Engineers. Nominated by ASME members and Fellows, ASME members must have 10 or more years of active practice and at least 10 years of active corporate membership in the Society to become an ASME Fellow. Dr. Tanaka was recently promoted to associate professor in Western Carolina University’s Department of Engineering and Technology. Tanaka has been a member of the Western Carolina University faculty for six years, following two years as assistant professor and lab manager at Wake Forest University’s School of Medicine. Prior to that, Tanaka spent 11 years in industry, beginning at Texas Instruments in Lexington, Ky., before joining VDO, a German-based automotive components supplier, where he designed automotive instrumentation for Mercedes-Benz, BMW and Volkswagen product lines. He also worked for ABB Group and Electro-Tec Corp. A member of ASME since 1990, Tanaka has served as chair of the ASME Bioengineering Division’s Design Dynamics and Rehabilitation Committee for the past three years. He graduated summa cum laude with a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering from North Carolina State University in 1992. He received a master’s degree in engineering mechanics from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University in 1994, and a Ph.D. in biomedical engineering from Virginia Tech and Wake Forest University in 2008.



Vikas Tomar, Ph.D.

Vikas Tomar, Ph.D.
Vikas Tomar, Ph.D.

ASME member Vikas Tomar, Ph.D., associate professor of aeronautics and astronautics at Purdue University, was recently named a Fellow of The American Society of Mechanical Engineers. Nominated by ASME members and Fellows, ASME members must have 10 or more years of active practice and at least 10 years of active corporate membership in the Society to become an ASME Fellow. Dr. Tomar’s research interests include microstructure dependent dynamic fracture prediction in materials; polymer composite life prediction based on environment dependent and rate dependent interface strength measurements; engineering mesoscale structural lattice systems using surface stress as the dominant strength-controlling mechanism; and biological and biomimetic material properties based on interface strength measurements. A member of ASME since 2004, Tomar is a former associate editor for the ASME Journal of Engineering Materials and Technology and a former member of the ASME Nanoengineering Council. He was the recipient of the ASME Materials Division’s Orr Early Career Award for excellence in failure materials research in 2010. Tomar earned a Bachelor of Technology degree from the National Institute of Technology in Kurukshetra, India, in 1998, and Master of Technology degree from the Indian Institute of Technology, Madras in 2001. He received a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from Georgia Institute of Technology in 2005.



Lei Zuo, Ph.D.

Lei Zuo, Ph.D.
Lei Zuo, Ph.D.

ASME member Lei Zuo, Ph.D., an associate professor of mechanical engineering and director of the College of Engineering’s Energy Harvesting and Mechatronics Research Lab at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, was recently named a Fellow of The American Society of Mechanical Engineers. The ASME Committee of Past Presidents confers the Fellow grade of membership on worthy candidates to recognize their outstanding engineering achievements. Dr. Zuo joined Virginia Tech in 2014 after six years at the State University of New York at Stony Brook and four years as a senior research scientist at Abbott Laboratories in Chicago. Zuo is the winner of two R&D 100 Awards, which recognize the top 100 most significant technology innovations during a given year. He won his first R&D 100 Award in 2011 for his research on energy-harvesting shock absorbers and a second award last year innovation in ocean wave energy harvesting. During the past two years several prestigious honors, including the ASME Design Engineering Division’s Thar Energy Design Award for pioneering research on energy harvesting and the ASME Best Paper Award on Structures and Structural Dynamics, as well as the Society of Automotive Engineers Ralph R. Teetor Educational Award and a Prosperity and the Planet (P3) Award from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. He is the author of more than 130 research papers, more than 40 of which have appeared in journals, and he holds five U.S. patents. After receiving a bachelor’s degree from Tsinghua University in Beijing, China, in 1997, Zuo went on to earn two master’s degrees in mechanical and electrical engineering in 2002 from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He received a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering in 2005.



Judith Bamberger, Ph.D., P.E.

Judith Bamberger, Ph.D., P.E.
(Left to right) Sriram Somasundaram, ASME Board of Governors member and chair of the Tri-Cities Engineers Week Coalition, award winner Judith Bamberger, and ASME President Julio Guerrero at the Tri-Cities Engineers Week Banquet and Recognition event.

ASME Fellow Judith Bamberger, Ph.D., P.E., a senior research engineer in experimental fluid mechanics at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in Richland, Wash., received the 2015 Tri-Cities Engineer of the Year award at the Tri-Cities Engineers Week Banquet and Recognition dinner on Feb. 26. The annual event is sponsored by the Tri-Cities Engineers Week Coalition and Washington State University as part of Engineers Week, which is organized by DiscoverE, formerly the National Engineers Week Foundation. Dr. Bamberger was nominated by ASME for the award, which recognizes technical contributions, professional society involvement and humanitarian activities during the past three years. During this period, Judith provided technical insight and advice to the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of River Protection and Bechtel regarding the pretreatment processing of nuclear waste from the Hanford Site. Bamberger’s ASME activities over the past three years have included publishing and chairing symposia for the Fluids Engineering Division, serving as leader of the North American Pacific District (District D), and supporting student and early career engineer development as a member of the ASME Student and Early Career Development Council. Currently the chair of the Henry R. Worthington Medal Committee, Bamberger has served in a number of other Society positions during her 38 years as a member, including secretary and member of the Nominating Committee, member of the Honors and Awards Committee, and chair of the ASME Columbia Basin Section. She received the ASME Dedicated Service Award in 2004.

ASME President Julio C. Guerrero was a speaker at the Tri-Cities Engineers Week Banquet, which he attended at the invitation of Sriram Somasundaram, ASME Board of Governors member and chair of the Tri-Cities Engineers Week Coalition. Dr. Guerrero’s presentation was titled “Inspiring Engineers and Students.”



Hongbing Lu, Ph.D.

Hongbing Lu, Ph.D.
Hongbing Lu, Ph.D.

ASME member Hongbing Lu, Ph.D., the Louis A. Beecherl Jr. Chair in Mechanical Engineering at the University of Texas at Dallas, was recently named a Fellow of The American Society of Mechanical Engineering. Nominated by ASME members and Fellows, ASME members must have 10 or more years of active practice and at least 10 years of active corporate membership in the Society to become an ASME Fellow. Dr. Lu, who is also the associate department head of mechanical engineering for the university’s Erik Jonsson School of Engineering and Computer Science, is a highly regarded researcher in fundamental areas of mechanics such as the mechanics of time-dependent materials, dynamic behavior of materials, mechanical behavior of nanomaterials, and fracture mechanics. His accomplishments include developing methods to test and predict the durability of materials, such as polymers used in aircraft and techniques for industrial companies to refine the process for manufacturing continuous thin sheets. Lu is the author of 93 journal papers, five book chapters, 63 conference papers, and holds two U.S. patents in areas including characterization of the viscoelastic behavior of polymers, aerogels, composites, and biomaterials at different temporal and length scales. He received two degrees from universities in China: a bachelor’s degree in solid mechanics from Huazhong University of Science and Technology in 1986 and a master’s degree in engineering mechanics from Tsinghua University in 1988. He received a Ph.D. in aeronautics from California Institute of Technology in 1997.



Bharat Bhushan, Ph.D., P.E.

Bharat Bhushan, Ph.D., P.E.
Bharat Bhushan, Ph.D., P.E.

The innovative oil spill remediation research of ASME Fellow Bharat Bhushan, Ph.D., P.E., Ohio Eminent Scholar and the Howard D. Winbigler Professor at the Ohio State University, and Ohio State postdoctoral researcher Philip Brown was recently recognized by Discover magazine, which ranked it 42nd among the top 100 stories of 2015 in the January 2016 issue. Their research, titled “Separating Oil from Water,” was also named as one of the top 10 science stories of 2015 by the website 52 Insights. Dr. Bhushan and Brown created a new mesh using a special coating that contains thousands of tiny holes that act like a colander. When a mixture of oil and water is poured over the treated mesh, the oil gets trapped and the water passes straight through, separating the liquids and helping to clean oil spills. Developed at Ohio State’s Nanoprobe Laboratory for Bio- and Nanotechnology and Biomimetics, where Bhushan serves as director, “Separating Oil from Water” was also honored by the Institution of Chemical Engineers with its 2015 IChemE Global Award outstanding achievement in chemical and process engineering in the water management and supply category. Bhushan was an ASME Congressional Fellow in 2013-2014, serving the Republican staff of the Committee on Science, Space and Technology (SST) in the U.S. House of Representatives. An active ASME volunteer, he has received a number of Society awards, including the Robert Henry Thurston Lecture Award in 2004, the Charles Russ Richards Memorial Award in 2000, the Melville Medal in 1992, and the Gustus L. Larson Memorial Award in 1986.



Sriram Sundararajan, Ph.D.

Sriram Sundararajan, Ph.D.
Sriram Sundararajan, Ph.D.

ASME member Sriram Sundararajan, Ph.D., a mechanical engineering professor at Iowa State University, was recently named a Fellow of The American Society of Mechanical Engineers. Nominated by ASME members and Fellows, ASME members must have 10 or more years of active practice and at least 10 years of active corporate membership in the Society to become an ASME Fellow. Dr. Sundararajan was recognized by the Society for his work as an outstanding researcher and dedicated mechanical engineering educator. His research on tribology and surface engineering has led to an improved understanding of surface mechanisms and their durability, and has resulted in advances in the areas of biomedical implants, biorenewable materials, micro device fabrication and more. Through his research, Sundararajan and his team have developed surfaces that repel water and have provided greater insight into the forces between cementitious particles and the impacts of synovial fluids on biomedical implant materials. They have also developed a technique to evaluate the nanoscale apex of probes used for scanning probe microscopy. An ABET program evaluator for ASME, Sundararajan has received both the Young Engineering Faculty Research Award and Early Achievement in Teaching Award from Iowa State. He received his Bachelor of Engineering degree in mechanical engineering from the Birla Institute of Technology and Science in Pilani, India, in 1995. He earned a master’s degree and a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from the Ohio State University in 1997 and 2001, respectively.



Christopher Cadou, Ph.D.

Christopher Cadou, Ph.D.
Christopher Cadou, Ph.D.

ASME member Christopher Cadou, Ph.D., associate professor of aerospace engineering at the University of Maryland, was recently named a Fellow of The American Society of Mechanical Engineers. A member of the University of Maryland faculty since 2000, Dr. Cadou is the Keystone Professor in the university’s A. James Clark School of Engineering. The Keystone Program encourages the school’s best faculty members to teach its most fundamental courses. Nominated by ASME members and Fellows, ASME members must have 10 or more years of active practice and at least 10 years of active corporate membership in the Society to become an ASME Fellow. Cadou’s research focuses on combustion, including the physics of power system miniaturization, engine-solid oxide fuel cell hybridization, film cooling in rocket nozzle extensions, and pulse jet engine noise reduction. He has co-authored more than 85 contributions to journals, books and conference proceedings, and he is the co-editor of the book Microscale Combustion and Power Generation. In addition to being an ASME Fellow, Cadou is an associate fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics. After earning bachelor’s degrees in mechanical engineering and history from Cornell University, he went on to receive both a master’s degree and Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from the University of California, Los Angeles. He has been a member of ASME for 20 years.



Zoubeida Ounaies, Ph.D.

Zoubeida Ounaies, Ph.D.
Zoubeida Ounaies, Ph.D.

ASME member Zoubeida Ounaies, Ph.D., the Dorothy Quiggle Career Developmental Professor of Mechanical Engineering at Pennsylvania State University was recently named a Fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. The ASME Committee of Past Presidents confers the Fellow grade of membership on worthy candidates to recognize their outstanding engineering achievements. ASME recognized Dr. Ounaies for her extensive record of leadership and service to ASME as well as her research contributions in the development and characterization of mechanical-electrical-chemical coupling in polymers and polymer nanocomposites, and applications to advanced sensor and actuator systems. Ounaies has co-authored more than 120 articles in journals, books and conference proceedings, and holds seven U.S. patents. Currently a member of the Aerospace Division Executive Committee, Ounaies has also served as chair and treasurer of the Society’s Adaptive Structures and Materials Systems Committee. In addition to her ASME membership, she is a member of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, the Materials Research Society and the International Society for Optical Engineering. Ounaies received a National Science Foundation CAREER grant in 2007. She is the recipient of three degrees in mechanical engineering from Penn State: a bachelor’s degree in 1989, a master’s degree in 1991, and a Ph.D. in 1996. She has been an ASME member since 2004.



Gregory D. Wight, P.E

Gregory D. Wight, P.E
Gregory D. Wight, P.E

ASME Life Member Gregory D. Wight, P.E., has been named Vermont’s 2016 Engineer of the Year by the Vermont Society of Professional Engineers. Prof. Wight, who has served as both associate dean and director of the David Crawford School of Engineering at Norwich University in Northfield, Vt., is an expert in the field of air quality engineering. He currently holds the Charles A. Dana Professorship of Engineering, the highest honor available to Norwich University faculty. His first post-education position was as an Engineering Air Force Officer in the United States Air Force Contract Management Division at the General Electric Aircraft Engines facility in Evendale, Ohio, where his primary duties were to ensure adherence to technical provisions of Department of Defense contracts. After four years active duty, he joined the Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection, where he served as principal air quality engineer, supervising a staff of six in the development of air pollutant emission inventory, air quality modelling, and strategies designed to achieve the National Ambient Air Quality Standards. In 1978, the opportunity to teach in the field of air quality engineering took him to Norwich University, where he has remained since, except for one year as a visiting civil/environmental engineering professor at the U.S. Air Force Academy in Colorado. In addition to being a life member of ASME, he is a member of the Vermont Society of Engineers, Tau Beta Pi, and the American Society for Engineering Education. He has also been actively involved with programs including MathCounts, FIRST Lego League, and Engineers without Borders. He received a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering from Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1967, and a master’s degree in mechanical engineering with an emphasis in air quality engineering from the University of Florida in 1968.



Sanjeev Khanna, Ph.D.

Sanjeev Khanna, Ph.D.
Sanjeev Khanna, Ph.D.

ASME member Sanjeev Khanna, Ph.D., the C.W. LaPierre Professor in the University of Missouri’s mechanical and aerospace engineering department, was recently named a Fellow of The American Society of Mechanical Engineers. Nominated by ASME members and Fellows, ASME members must have 10 or more years of active practice and at least 10 years of active corporate membership in the Society to become an ASME Fellow. Dr. Khanna was recognized for his service to ASME as well as his efforts in educating future generations of mechanical engineers, his research with Ford Motor Company concerning the effect of residual stresses on fatigue behavior of spot-welded joints, and his patented research on transparent glass fiber reinforced polymer composites. According to the citation from ASME, Khanna’s work on spot weld characterization, which was sponsored by the National Science Foundation, Ford Motor and the Auto/Steel Partnership, “has contributed to better automobile structure design, and his research on fiber-reinforced polymer composites has resulted in a patent on transparent composites for windows to protect against natural and man-made hazards.” In addition, he was recognized for his leadership innovative integration of new pedagogical approaches, such as problem-based learning, in mechanical engineering curriculum, and for his efforts training students in energy efficiency. The recipient of the National Science Foundation’s CAREER Award and the South Dakota Governor’s Teaching with Technology Award, Khanna received both a bachelor’s and a master’s degree in mechanical engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur, and a doctorate in mechanical engineering and applied mechanics from the University of Rhode Island. He has been an ASME member since 1998.



Venkat Krovi, Ph.D.

Venkat Krovi, Ph.D.
Venkat Krovi, Ph.D.

ASME member Venkat Krovi, Ph.D., professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering at the University of Buffalo’s School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, was recently named a Fellow of The American Society of Mechanical Engineers. Nominated by ASME members and Fellows, Fellowship is bestowed upon members who have made significant contributions to mechanical engineering. ASME members must have 10 or more years of active practice and at least 10 years of active corporate membership in ASME to become an ASME Fellow. Dr. Krovi, a celebrated robotics expert, was cited for “contributions spanning the lifecycle design and modeling to evaluation and verification of mechanical and mechatronic systems in several domains including customized assistive devices and distributed robotic systems.” As director of the University of Buffalo’s Automation, Robotics and Mechatronics (ARM) Laboratory, Krovi’s research focuses on the lifecycle (design, modeling, analysis, control, implementation and verification) of a new generation of smart, embedded mechanical, mechatronic and robotic systems. Krovi, who joined the university in 2001, has served on a number of committees for ASME and other scientific organizations; has organized international conferences, including ASME’s 2014 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences, and has served as editor for several academic journals. He received a Bachelor of Technology degree in mechanical engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology Madras in 1992, and a master’s degree and Ph.D. in mechanical engineering and applied mechanics from the University of Pennsylvania in 1998.



R. Craig McClung, Ph.D.

R. Craig McClung, Ph.D.
R. Craig McClung, Ph.D.

ASME member R. Craig McClung, Ph.D., program director at Southwest Research Institute in San Antonio, Texas, has received the Coffin-Manson Fatigue Achievement Award from the ASTM Committee E08 on Fatigue and Fracture. An ASTM member since 1990, Dr. McClung serves as a member-at-large on the E08 executive subcommittee. He is an ASTM Fellow, having received the Award of Merit, ASTM’s highest honor for individual contributions to standards activities, in 2011. The E08 committee has also honored McClung with the Fatigue Lecturer Award and the Jerry Swedlow Memorial Lecturer Award. McClung’s career has focused on research and program management in fatigue and fracture, including both detailed scientific studies of basic phenomena and the development of robust engineering models and software for structural life prediction. He has been a member of the Southwest Research Institute staff since 1988, and has held a variety of positions including senior research engineer and section manager. He assumed his current position in 2006. A graduate of the University of Tennessee, where he received a bachelor’s degree in engineering science, McClung earned a master’s degree in theoretical and applied mechanics and a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He also holds a master’s degree in religion from Harding Graduate School of Religion. He has been a member of ASME since 1989.



Thomas C. Heil

Thomas C. Heil
Thomas C. Heil

ASME Fellow Thomas C. Heil was honored earlier this month with the Society's Performance Test Codes Medal. Heil was recognized with the award for his outstanding contributions to performance test codes, particularly for the testing of steam generators and related auxiliaries; and for developing computational methods and software for determining results. The medal, established in 1981, is bestowed on an individual for outstanding contributions to the development and promotion of performance test codes. It was presented to Heil during ASME's Performance Test Codes 4 Committee Meeting on Jan. 6 in Juno Beach, Fla. An ASME Fellow, Heil attended the University of South Carolina on a Naval ROTC scholarship. Upon graduation from the university in 1960 with a bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering, he served as a first lieutenant in the U.S. Marine Corps as a platoon leader of engineering and heavy equipment platoons. Following completion of his term in the Marine Corps, Heil joined the Babcock & Wilcox Co. in Barberton, Ohio, where he spent four years in the field service department starting up all sizes of boilers, conducting tests and solving problems. He also served as a contract supervisor in project management before accepting the role of advisory engineer in design engineering, where he led the performance analysis group. Heil retired from Babcock & Wilcox in 2002, yet remains active in ASME performance test code (PTC) work. A member of ASME for nearly 25 years, he is the recipient of many honors and awards, including the Performance Test Codes Medal in 2015, the ASME Dedicated Service Award in 1994, and Babcock & Wilcox's Engineering Honors Award in 1993.



Denys Stavnychyi

Denys Stavnychyi
Denys Stavnychyi

ASME member Denys Stavnychyi was recently hired by Burns & McDonnell in Houston, Texas, as a pipeline project manager. A mechanical engineer and native of Ukraine, Stavnychyi has nearly 20 years of long-haul pipeline project experience including design and construction management. His previous work has included multiple large, high-pressure pipeline construction projects both internationally and within the United States, and he has held both engineering and project management roles including liquid and gas pipeline operations, design and construction on interstate and intrastate transmission projects, FERC 7(c) application projects, safety enhancement and modernization/replacement programs. Stavnychyi has led teams on some of the largest pipeline projects in the industry, including most recently, a successful, multi-billion-dollar, 500-mile natural gas pipeline project in Alabama, Georgia and Florida. He has also led projects for Pacific Gas & Electric, BP, Enterprise Products, Arendal/Gasoductos Mexicanos De C.V., Kinder Morgan and MarkWest Energy. Stavnychyi received his bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering from Ivano-Frankivsk State Technical University of Oil and Gas in 1996. He has been an ASME member since 2007.



Armistead (Ted) G. Russell, Ph.D.

Armistead (Ted) G. Russell, Ph.D.
Armistead (Ted) G. Russell, Ph.D.

ASME Fellow Armistead (Ted) G. Russell, Ph.D., an engineering researcher and professor at the Georgia Institute of Technology, was honored Nov. 5 with the Washington State University Alumni Association (WSUAA) Alumni Achievement Award for his work in air quality science related to health, public policy and sustainable development. Established in 1970, the award recognizes alumni who have given outstanding service to the university and made contributions to their professions and communities. The award is the highest honor bestowed by the Alumni Association. Dr. Russell is the Howard T. Tellepsen Chair and Regents Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Georgia Tech, and co-director of the Southeastern Center for Air Pollution Epidemiology and director of the Air Resources Engineering Center. Russell's research has advanced the understanding of trace contaminants in the air, computational modeling, air quality engineering and health. His particular contributions are based on his ability to integrate these areas and provide information that is used in managing air quality and developing national public policy. Russell's work modeling air pollution particulates, nitrogen oxides and ozone, and the impacts of alternative fuel use on the atmosphere has had significant societal impact. His analyses of air contaminants and health is a foundation for a modeling system recently adopted by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). In addition to serving on the National Research Council Board of Environmental Studies and Toxicology and nine of its committees, he was one of seven members of the chartered U.S. EPA Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee and a member of the World Health Organization's International Agency for Research on Cancer committee on air pollution. Russell received his bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering from WSU in 1979. He received a master's degree and a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from California Institute of Technology in 1980 and 1985, respectively.



Fuh-Gwo Yuan, Ph.D.

Fuh-Gwo Yuan, Ph.D.
Fuh-Gwo Yuan, Ph.D.

ASME member Fuh-Gwo Yuan, Ph.D., professor at North Carolina State University's Smart Structures and Materials Laboratory and Samuel P. Langley Distinguished Professor at the National Institute of Aerospace, was recently named a Fellow of The American Society of Mechanical Engineers. Nominated by ASME members and Fellows, an ASME member must have 10 or more years of active practice and at least 10 years of active corporate membership in ASME to become an ASME Fellow. The honor recognizes Dr. Yuan's years of dedication to smart sensors, structural health monitoring, as well as the education of future engineers through his work with master's and Ph.D. students. Yuan is an internationally recognized expert in the field of structural health monitoring, fracture and life prediction of advanced materials and structures, smart materials and structures, and damage tolerance of composite structures. His research is leading to the development of advanced structural health monitoring systems that will impact future design and maintenance of large and complex aerospace, mechanical, and civil structures. At NIA, Yuan's research is focused on smart aircraft structures for structural health management and condition-based maintenance. His research interests include composite material state awareness (damage state models, virtual load sensors, NDE inverse problems); structural health monitoring (multifunctional materials, damage detection and assessment); and health management (out-of-autoclave composite repair, smart repair, repair durability in damage tolerant and fail safe designs). After receiving a bachelor's degree in in engineering science from National Cheng-Kung University in Taiwan in 1977, Yuan went on to receive a master's degree and a Ph.D. in theoretical and applied mechanics from the University of Illinois-Urbana-Champaign in 1981 and 1986, respectively.



Dennis Assanis, Ph.D.

Dennis Assanis, Ph.D.
Dennis Assanis, Ph.D.

ASME Fellow Dennis Assanis, Ph.D., provost and senior vice president for academic affairs at Stony Brook University (N.Y.), has been elected as the next president of the University of Delaware, after a unanimous vote by the Board of Trustees at a special meeting on Nov. 18. Assanis will take office on July 1, 2016. Nancy M. Targett will continue to serve as the University of Delaware's acting president until then. Dr. Assanis is a distinguished educator with a wide range of academic leadership experience and an international reputation as a scholar and expert in both fundamental and applied studies of internal combustion engines and energy systems. Since 2011, Assanis has served as provost and senior vice president for academic affairs at Stony Brook University and as vice president for Brookhaven National Laboratory Affairs. At Stony Brook, he has led the development of a strategic plan for academic affairs and launched a number of initiatives strengthening the faculty, programs for undergraduate and graduate students, research and scholarly activities, and global engagement. Before joining Stony Brook University, Assanis was a member of the University of Michigan faculty for 17 years, where he was the Jon R. and Beverly S. Holt Professor of Engineering and Arthur F. Thurnau Professor, as well as director of the Michigan Memorial Phoenix Energy Institute, founding director of the U.S.-China Clean Energy Research Center for Clean Vehicles, and director of the Walter E. Lay Automotive Laboratory. The recipient of ASME's Pi Tau Sigma Gold Medal in 1990 and the Internal Combustion Engine Award in 2008, Assanis has served ASME in a number of capacities over the years, including member of the Mechanical Engineering Department Heads Committee and associate editor for the Journal of Turbomachinery and the Journal of Engineering for Gas Turbines and Power. He received an honors Bachelor of Science degree with distinction in marine engineering from Newcastle University in England in 1980, and four degrees from Massachusetts Institute of Technology: a master's degree in naval architecture and marine engineering and a master's degree in mechanical engineering, both in 1982; a Master of Science in management from the Sloan School of Management in 1986; and a Ph.D. in power and propulsion in 1985.



Dewey H. Hodges, Ph.D.

Dewey H. Hodges, Ph.D.
Dewey H. Hodges, Ph.D.

ASME Fellow Dewey H. Hodges, Ph.D., professor of aerospace engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology, was honored by The American Society of Mechanical Engineers with the Society's Spirit of St. Louis Medal. He was recognized for the development of the theory and methodology for modeling the dynamics and aeroelasticity of composite helicopter rotor blades, highly flexible slender aircraft wings and wind turbine blades; and their implementation in the variational asymptotical beam sectional (VABS) analysis software used extensively in research and industry. The medal, established in 1929, is awarded for meritorious service in the advancement of aeronautics and astronautics. The award was presented to Dr. Hodges during ASME's 2015 International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition, which was held from Nov. 13 to 19 in Houston. Hodges has been a professor of aerospace engineering at Georgia Tech since 1986. Recently, his research group has been developing methods for accurate analysis and stress recovery in composite beams, including helicopter rotor blades, and in plates and shells. Before joining Georgia Tech, Hodges was a research scientist at the U.S. Army Aeroflightdynamics Directorate at NASA's Ames Research Center from 1970 to 1986. During this time he also served as a lecturer at Stanford University, and in 1984 was a guest research scientist at the DLR, the German Aerospace Center in Braunschweig. Hodges has published five books and 200 journal papers in the fields of rotorcraft dynamics, structural dynamics, aeroelasticity, structural mechanics and stability, computational mechanics and optimal control. He holds two U.S. patents. Hodges serves on the editorial boards for the Journal of Fluids and Structures, the Journal of Mechanics of Materials and Structures, and Nonlinear Dynamics. Hodges served as a track organizer for ASME's International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition in 2014 and 2015, and has reviewed dozens of papers for Society journals over the last 40 years. Hodges received his bachelor's degree with high honors in aerospace engineering from the University of Tennessee in 1969. He earned his master's degree and Ph.D. in aeronautical and astronautical engineering from Stanford University in 1970 and 1973, respectively.



Arun Majumdar, Ph.D.

Arun Majumdar, Ph.D.
Arun Majumdar, Ph.D.

ASME Honorary Member Arun Majumdar, Ph.D., professor of mechanical engineering at Stanford University, was recently named as co-director of the university's Precourt Institute for Energy. Dr. Majumdar serves as co-director of the institute with Sally M. Benson, professor of energy resources engineering at Stanford. The Precourt Institute supports Stanford research and education intended to make the world's energy systems less vulnerable to environmental, economic and security threats, and more capable of delivering modern energy service to billions of people now living without it. Majumdar, who is the first Jay Precourt Provostial Chair Professor, joined the Stanford faculty in the mechanical engineering department in 2014. Majumdar is widely recognized as a leader in energy development and innovation, contributing to important programs during a distinguished research career at the University of California, Berkeley, Arizona State University, and other research institutions. His current research focuses broadly on energy conversion and re-engineering the electricity grid. In 2009, Majumdar was appointed by President Barack Obama as the founding director of the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy, where he carried out transformational R&D in energy efficiency, renewable technologies, and storage systems. Prior to joining the Stanford faculty, Majumdar served for two years at Google as the vice president for energy, where he established several energy technology initiatives and advised the company on its broader energy strategy. An ASME Fellow, Majumdar was associate editor of the Journal of Heat Transfer from 1998 to 2001 and founding chair of the ASME Nanotechnology Institute from 2003 to 2006. He is the recipient of several Society awards, including the Melville Medal, the Gustus Larson Memorial Award and the Heat Transfer Memorial Award-Science. Majumdar received a bachelor's degree from the Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, and both a master's degree and Ph.D. from UC Berkeley.



Shiyu Zhou, Ph.D.

Shiyu Zhou, Ph.D.
Shiyu Zhou, Ph.D.

ASME member Shiyu Zhou, Ph.D., professor of industrial and systems engineering at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, was recently named a Fellow of The American Society of Mechanical Engineers. Nominated by ASME members and Fellows, an ASME member must have 10 or more years of active practice and at least 10 years of active corporate membership in ASME to become an ASME Fellow. Dr. Zhou has been a member of the University of Wisconsin-Madison faculty since 2002, when he joined the university as an assistant professor in the industrial engineering department. His research interests include modeling and analysis of the variation propagation and other in-process sensing data in complex manufacturing processes; in-process quality and productivity improvement through the diagnosis of complicated manufacturing processes using sensor fusion, feature extraction, and pattern recognition based on engineering field knowledge; and fast calibration and active compensation for manufacturing systems. Although he teaches industrial and systems engineering, Zhou studied mechanical engineering for several years at the University of Science and Technology of China in Hefei, China, where he received a bachelor's and a master's degree in mechanical engineering in 1993 and 1996, respectively. He also received two degrees from the University of Michigan: a master's degree in industrial and operations engineering in 2000, and a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering, also in 2000.



Robert L. Clark, Jr., Ph.D.

Robert L. Clark, Jr., Ph.D.
Robert L. Clark, Jr., Ph.D.

ASME Fellow Robert L. Clark, Jr., Ph.D., senior vice president for research at the University of Rochester and dean of the Hajim School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, has been named the university's 10th provost. Dr. Clark's five-year term as provost will begin on July 1, 2016. Clark will serve in dual roles as provost and senior vice president for research. In 2013, he was named senior vice president for research and since then has served both in this role and as Hajim School dean, a position he has held for the past seven years. As provost, Clark will assume responsibility for advancing the university's academic, teaching and global engagement missions, in addition to furthering the university's progress as an internationally distinguished research institution. The provost also provides leadership to select units of the university, including Information Technology, River Campus Libraries, the Memorial Art Gallery, the University of Rochester Press, and the University Health Service. Clark, who was named interim senior vice president for research in 2012 and accepted the permanent role a year later, joined the University in 2008 from Duke University, after serving as senior associate dean and dean of the Pratt School of Engineering. Clark, whose expertise in the science of acoustics and in bionanomanufacturing, has authored 130 journal publications and received a number of awards, including the Lindsey Award of the Acoustical Society of America, the National Science Foundation Career Program Award, the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers, and the NASA Group Achievement Award.



Joe Cecil, Ph.D.

Joe Cecil, Ph.D.
Joe Cecil, Ph.D.

ASME member Joe Cecil, Ph.D., associate professor in the school of industrial engineering at Oklahoma State University, was recently named a Fellow of The American Society of Mechanical Engineers. Nominated by ASME members and Fellows, an ASME member must have 10 or more years of active practice and at least 10 years of active corporate membership in ASME to become an ASME Fellow. Dr. Cecil was selected for his outstanding accomplishments in the area of Information Centric Engineering (ICE), a new interdisciplinary area that focuses on modeling, simulation and the exchange of information. ICE recognizes the critical role of information in today's information intensive engineering activities, which also involves exchanging information across various platforms among geographically distributed partners. Dr. Cecil's research includes the design of virtual reality-based design approaches for a variety of process domains, from micro-assembly to space systems, and the design of collaborative frameworks for distributed engineering activities. Cecil is also an advocate for the adoption of e-learning approaches as well as a leader in the design of virtual learning environments to teach engineering concepts. His recent research has involved working with autism and education experts in exploring the impact of virtual environments to teach STEM topics to children with autism. He is part of an inter-university initiative involving the use of the Next Generation Internet, which is currently being developed by the National Science Foundation and other agencies. Cecil is an active member of ASME, having served as the chair of the Material Handling Division and an organizer of numerous symposiums for the Society's annual International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition (IMECE).



Olivier Bauchau, Ph.D.

Olivier Bauchau, Ph.D.
Olivier Bauchau, Ph.D.

ASME Fellow Olivier Bauchau, Ph.D., recently joined the University of Maryland as the first Igor Sikorsky Distinguished Professor in Rotorcraft. Supported through an endowment from Sikorsky and United Technologies, the Igor Sikorsky Distinguished Professorship in Rotorcraft in the university's department of aerospace engineering serves to support enhanced research specialization in areas related to rotorcraft. Dr. Bauchau, who has more than 30 years of experience in the rotorcraft field, is a widely recognized scholar in aeromechanics of rotorcraft, multibody and structural dynamics, composite structures, and wind turbine systems. Bauchau's work on comprehensive aeromechanics analysis of rotorcraft, modeling of flexible multibody systems involving composite structures, and modeling of rotor lag dampers are pioneering efforts in the rotary-wing field. At the University of Maryland, he aims to employ research currently being done in computational fluid dynamics, aerodynamics, and rotorcraft to contribute to his computational modeling work in both rotorcraft and the wind energy industry. Bauchau helped create the comprehensive multibody dynamics code, DYMORE, which has been widely adopted by industry, government and academia to model all aspects of helicopter design such as dynamics, aerodynamics, controls, and composite materials. He is the recipient of the 2016 ASME d'Alembert Award for his numerous contributions to the field of multibody system dynamics. Bauchau received his Ph.D. in aeronautics and astronautics from Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1981.



Nandika D'Souza, Ph.D., P.E.

Nandika D'Souza, Ph.D., P.E.
Nandika D'Souza, Ph.D., P.E.

ASME member Nandika D'Souza, Ph.D., P.E., Regents Professor of mechanical and energy engineering at the University of North Texas (UNT) and associate dean of undergraduate studies in the university's college of engineering, has been named the 2015 Society of Women Engineers Distinguished Engineering Educator. The award is presented to educators who make significant contributions to the engineering field. Dr. D'Souza, who serves as vice president for outreach for SWE's Dallas Section and as advisor for her university's SWE student chapter, has worked with undergraduate and graduate students in the area of failure analysis, viscoelasticity and material reliability. Her teaching and research focuses on mechanics and materials and how best to incorporate them reliably in design. Recently, she has focused on microelectronic packaging, biomedical surgical mesh, the creation of plant-based building materials, and plant-based carbon fiber. D'Souza has published more than 160 book chapters, journal articles and peer reviewed conference proceedings, and has received a number of awards, including the ASME Electronics and Photonics Packaging Division's Engineer of the Year Award in 2009, the UNT Research Leadership Award, the UNT College of Engineering Research Award, and the Vinyl Division Thesis Award from the International Society of Plastics Engineers. She received her Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from Texas A&M University of 1994. D'Souza has been a member of ASME since 1996.



Caroline L. Genzale, Ph.D.

Caroline L. Genzale, Ph.D.
Caroline L. Genzale, Ph.D.

ASME member Caroline L. Genzale, Ph.D., assistant professor in the Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology, was recently awarded the Army Research Office (ARO) Young Investigator Award, which includes a three-year grant that began this fall. Her project, titled "Spatially and Temporally Resolved Imaging of Primary Breakup in High-Pressure Fuel Sprays," involves the development of a novel high-resolution imaging diagnostic to study the mechanisms of atomization in high-pressure fuel sprays for diesel combustion engines. In spite of decades of diesel engine development and research, much is still not known about the fundamental mechanisms that control spray breakup and atomization at engine-relevant conditions. This lack of clarity can lead to uncertainties in the fuel-air preparation process and resulting performance and emissions outcomes of the engine — information that is crucial to Army initiatives focused on shifting ground vehicle engines towards new fuel streams. Dr. Genzale's technique employs new high-power pulsed LEDs in multiple colors to record transient motion spectrally, avoiding the conventional high-speed frame transfer operations used in high-speed cameras, and enabling sequential image capture within nanoseconds. Genzale, who joined the Georgia Tech faculty in 2010, has earned three mechanical engineering degrees: a bachelor's degree from the University of Southern California (1997), a master's degree from the University of North Carolina at Charlotte (2003), and a Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin-Madison (2009).



Michael Robinson

Michael Robinson
Michael Robinson

ASME student member Michael Robinson, a mechanical engineering undergraduate at Michigan Technological University, was recently awarded an Alan Mulally Leadership in Engineering Scholarship by the Ford Motor Company. Robinson was one of 10 students who were selected to receive the $10,000 scholarship. Named in honor of the company's former president and CEO, the Alan Mulally Leadership in Engineering Scholarship program will annually award 10 one-time $10,000 scholarships to outstanding sophomore or junior engineering students throughout the world who are pursuing degrees in the field of automotive engineering at Ford's 20 premiere partner universities. The program, which began this year, will run for 10 years. Robinson, a second-year mechanical engineering major with an electrical engineering minor, was selected for the scholarship based on his academic performance, his internship experience, and his leadership in student organizations at his school including the ASME student section, according to the company.



Timothy A. Ameel, Ph.D.

Timothy A. Ameel, Ph.D.
Timothy A. Ameel, Ph.D.

ASME member Timothy A. Ameel, Ph.D., professor and chair in the department of mechanical engineering at the University of Utah, was recently named as a Fellow of The American Society of Mechanical Engineers. Nominated by ASME members and Fellows, an ASME member must have 10 or more years of active practice and at least 10 years of active corporate membership in ASME to become an ASME Fellow. Dr. Ameel was recognized for his outstanding achievements and leadership in microfluidics and nanofluidics. He is recognized by his peers as a pioneer for his seminal work in microchannel flows and heat transfer. His work on slip flow convection in microchannels, in particular, has resulted in a number of important advances that have helped shape the understanding of these important microscale conditions. A member of the university's mechanical engineering faculty member since 1996 and the department chair since 2009, Ameel has played a significant role in developing and fostering research, in hiring faculty, and in forming the department's curricula. Ameel successfully championed the integration of undergraduate labs with lecture classes, which provided continuous, uninterrupted reinforcement of the fundamentals. He also helped develop two new mechanical engineering degrees: a dual Bachelor of Science/Master of Science degree and a Master of Science non-thesis degree. His research has resulted in nearly 90 peer-reviewed journal and conference papers and an international reputation as an expert in microchannel flows and heat transfer. Ameel has been the recipient of a number of honors and awards, including the Fulbright Scholar Award, the Ralph R. Teetor Educational Award, and several teaching awards from the university's College of Engineering. Ameel received a bachelor's and a master's degree in mechanical engineering from Montana State University in 1975 and 1977, respectively. He received a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from Arizona State University in 1991.



Tony Jun Huang, Ph.D.

Tony Jun Huang, Ph.D.
Tony Jun Huang, Ph.D.

ASME member Tony Jun Huang, Ph.D., a professor of engineering science and mechanics at Pennsylvania State University, was recently named as a Fellow of The American Society of Mechanical Engineers. The highest elected level of ASME membership, Fellowship is conferred upon members with at least 10 years of active engineering practice who have made significant contributions to the profession. Dr. Huang was cited for his pioneering contributions to optofluidics, acoustofluidics and the invention of surface acoustic wave tweezers. A Penn State faculty member since 2005, Huang has been recognized with a variety of awards, including the 2010 National Institutes of Health Director's New Innovator Award, a 2011 Penn State Engineering Alumni Society Outstanding Research Award, a 2011 Journal of Laboratory Automation (JALA) Top Ten Breakthroughs of the Year Award, a 2012 Society for Manufacturing Engineers Outstanding Young Manufacturing Engineer Award, a 2013 Penn State Faculty Scholar Medal, a 2013 American Asthma Foundation Scholar Award, and the 2014 Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Sensors Council Technical Achievement Award. This is the fourth fellowship announcement in 2015 for Huang, who was also elected as a fellow of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering, the Institute of Physics, and the Royal Society of Chemistry. He received a bachelor's and a master's degree in energy and power engineering from Xi'an Jiao Tong University, Xi'an, China, in 1996 and 1999, respectively, and a doctorate in mechanical and aerospace engineering from the University of California, Los Angeles, in 2005.



June Ling

June Ling
June Ling

The Society for Standards Professionals (SES) has awarded June Ling, retiring deputy executive director of ASME, with the 2015 Leo B. Moore Medal for distinguished contribution to standardization.

The Leo B. Moore Medal is the most prestigious award conferred by the Society for Standards Professionals. Key factors in the selection of recipients include “highest achievement, extraordinary contribution, and distinguished service in standardization” and advancing standardization “through original research and writing, creative application and development, or professional and public service.” More information about the Leo B. Moore Medal is available here.

ASME congratulates June Ling for this very well-deserved recognition of her landmark contributions to the field.



Francesco Costanzo, Ph.D.

Francesco Costanzo, Ph.D.
Francesco Costanzo, Ph.D.

ASME member Francesco Costanzo, Ph.D., professor of engineering science and mechanics at Pennsylvania State University, was recently named a Fellow of The American Society of Mechanical Engineers. Nominated by ASME members and Fellows, an ASME member must have 10 or more years of active practice and at least 10 years of active corporate membership in ASME to become an ASME Fellow. Dr. Costanzo was cited for his scholarship of research contributions to thermo-elastodynamics, homogenization and finite element methods, and for innovative educational pedagogies culminating in new textbooks on statics and dynamics. He is a member of Penn State’s Center for Neural Engineering, where he is exploring multi-scale computational models and companion numerical methods for fluid transport in brain tissue. Since joining Penn State in 1995, Costanzo has been honored for his teaching and research with a National Science Foundation Faculty Early Career Development Award, the American Society of Engineering Education’s Outstanding New Mechanics Educator Award, and the Penn State Engineering Alumni Society’s Outstanding Teaching and Premier Teaching Awards. Costanzo received a Laurea degree with honors in aeronautical engineering from Politecnico di Milano in 1989 and a doctorate in aeronautical engineering from Texas A&M University in 1993.



William W. Bathie, P.E.

William W. Bathie, P.E.
William W. Bathie, P.E.

ASME Life Fellow William W. Bathie, P.E., will receive the 2015 Distinguished Examination Service Award from the National Council of Examiners for Engineering and Surveying (NCEES) at the council's annual Awards and Installation Gala on Aug. 21. The award recognizes committed NCEES exam program volunteers for their outstanding contributions to the exam program and their efforts to advance the council's licensing exams and improve the exam development process. Bathie began volunteering with the NCEES Principles and Practice of Engineering Mechanical Exam Development Committee in 1979, and has attended nearly all of its meetings over the last 35 years. Throughout the 1980s, he was one of several members on the committee, and demonstrated a deep commitment to the NCEES exams and the licensure process. He has participated in a variety of exam-related activities, including writing and reviewing questions, assembling and grading exams, and participating in studies to update specifications and to establish passing scores. Bathie served as vice chair of the exam's development committee from 1993 to 1998, and then as chair from 1998 to 2003. He continues to be a resource and mentor for new leaders on the Thermal and Fluid Systems Subcommittee, and remains an active member of the PE Mechanical Exam Development Committee. During his nearly 50 years as a member of ASME, Bathie has served in a number of positions with the Society, including vice chair of the Committee on Membership, member of Fellows Review Committee, and vice president of ASME's former Region VII. He received the ASME Dedicated Service Award in 1998.


Robert Parker, Ph.D

Robert Parker, Ph.D
Robert Parker, Ph.D

ASME Fellow Robert Parker, Ph.D., the L.S. Randolph Professor of Mechanical Engineering at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, has been named the recipient of the 2015 ASME N.O. Myklestad Award for innovative contributions to vibration engineering and research throughout his career. The award was presented Aug. 3 at the ASME International Design Engineering Technical Conferences (IDETC) in Boston, where Dr. Parker also gave the Myklestad Plenary Lecture. According to his nomination by Kon-Well Wang, chair of the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor's department of mechanical engineering, Dr. Parker is an "expert on the vibration of high-speed power transmissions such as geared and belt-pulley systems." Dr. Wang added that Parker's new research has "provided insight and new tools such that some of the critical and unsolved issues in gear vibration and noise can now be easily resolved." Parker's achievements include the assembling of a state-of-the-art test stand, fixtures, and gearing to produce the only data measuring the operating condition vibration of all the internal components of planetary gears, according to Wang. The award also recognizes Parker's work on minimizing vibration, a technique credited with solving a major vibration problem threatening the existence of a wind turbine company in New Zealand, and significantly reducing engine noise in Ford and Volvo products. Parker recently received the 2015 Doak Prize from the Journal of Sound and Vibration for his research on instabilities in high-speed planetary gears inside airplane engines.


Janis P. Terpenny, PhD

Janis P. Terpenny, PhD
Janis P. Terpenny, PhD

ASME Fellow Janis P. Terpenny, PhD, has been named the Peter and Angela Dal Pezzo Department Head of the Harold and Inge Marcus Department of Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering at Penn State, effective Sept. 7. Currently, Dr. Terpenny is the Joseph Walkup Professor and chair of the Department of Industrial and Manufacturing Systems Engineering at Iowa State University. She is also the director of Iowa State's Center of e-Design, a National Science Foundation (NSF) Industry University Collaborative Research Center, and she serves as the technical lead of the Digital Manufacturing and Design Innovation Institute's Advanced Manufacturing Enterprise Area. Prior to joining Iowa State in 2011, Terpenny held faculty positions at Virginia Tech and the University of Massachusetts. She also served as the program director for the NSF Division of Undergraduate Education. She was named a Fellow of the Institute of Industrial Engineers in 2010 and of The American Society of Mechanical Engineers in 2012, and was inducted as a Tau Beta Pi Eminent Engineer in 2011. Terpenny's research and teaching interests include engineering design process and methods and engineering design education, including engineering economics, intelligent and integrated design systems, and systems analysis/systems engineering. Terpenny received a bachelor's degree in mathematical sciences from Virginia Commonwealth University, and her master's and doctoral degrees in industrial and systems engineering from Virginia Tech.


Yuan Dong, PhD

Yuan Dong, PhD
Yuan Dong, PhD

ASME member Yuan Dong, PhD, a senior fellow at Pratt & Whitney's compression systems aerodynamics group, was recently named as a Fellow of The American Society of Mechanical Engineers. The ASME Committee of Past Presidents confers the Fellow grade of membership on worthy candidates to recognize their outstanding engineering achievements. Nominated by ASME members and Fellows, an ASME member must have 10 or more years of active practice and at least 10 years of active corporate membership in ASME to become an ASME Fellow. Dong began working for Pratt & Whitney in 2002, after having previously worked for Pratt & Whitney Canada and other engineering companies. A member of ASME since 1999, Dong has been an active ASME volunteer, having served the ASME International Gas Turbine Institute in various capacities. He received a bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering from Shanghai Jiao Tong University, China, and a PhD in aerodynamics engineering from Cambridge University.


Maurizio Porfiri, PhD

Maurizio Porfiri, PhD
Maurizio Porfiri, PhD

ASME member Maurizio Porfiri, PhD, professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering at New York University Polytechnic School of Engineering, has been selected as the recipient of ASME's 2015 C.D. Mote, Jr. Early Career Award for his contributions in the field of vibration and acoustics. The ASME Design Engineering Division's Technical Committee on Vibration and Sound will present the award to Dr. Porfiri on Aug. 5 at the ASME 2015 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences in Boston. The prize, named for the president of the National Academy of Engineering, recognizes Porfiri's efforts to shed light on the interactions between fluid flows and the dynamics of nautical and aerospace structures. By advancing new tools in nonlinear dynamics, experimental fluid dynamics, and computational mechanics, his Dynamical Systems Laboratory aims to contribute to the design of lightweight, fuel-efficient, and resilient marine vessels. His current research also includes microelectromechanical systems, underwater robotics, complex Systems, and collective behavior. One of Popular Science magazine's "Brilliant 10" list of young innovators for 2010, Porfiri has received a number of honors, including ASME's Gary Anderson Early Achievement Award for his contributions to the field of smart structures and materials, the ASME Dynamics Systems and Control Division Young Investigator Award, and a National Science Foundation Faculty Early Career Development Program (CAREER) award. The author of author of approximately 200 journal publications, Porfiri received both a master's degree and a PhD in engineering mechanics from Virginia Tech. He also received a Laurea degree in electrical engineering and a PhD in theoretical and applied mechanics in a dual-degree program from the Sapienza University of Rome and the University of Toulon in France.


Pedro Ponte Castañeda, PhD

Pedro Ponte Castañeda, PhD
Pedro Ponte Castañeda, PhD

ASME member Pedro Ponte Castañeda, PhD, the Raymond S. Markowitz Faculty Fellow and Professor in the department of mechanical engineering and applied mechanics at the University of Pennsylvania, was recently named as a Fellow of The American Society of Mechanical Engineers. The ASME Committee of Past Presidents confers the Fellow grade of membership on worthy candidates to recognize their outstanding engineering achievements. Dr. Ponte's research is in the area of heterogeneous material systems, including composites, polycrystalline aggregates and particulate flows. In the area of composite materials, he concentrates on nonlinear constitutive and kinematical effects as observed in low-temperature plasticity and high-temperature creep of metal-matrix composites, as well as in the large-deformation behavior of black-filled and porous elastomers. His group is also concerned with the theoretical development of constitutive models for porous metals, accounting for the evolution of the microstructure. He is developing constitutive models for low-symmetry polycrystals, and also working on the numerical implementation of these models in constitutive subroutines. Ponte's research group is also developing structure-property relations for thermoplastic elastomers and semi-crystalline polymers. Ponte was the recipient of the Humboldt Research Award in 2013, the Heilmeier Award for Excellence in Faculty Research in 2007, and the ASME Achievement Award for Young Investigators in Applied Mechanics in 2000. He received bachelor's degrees in mechanical engineering and mathematics from Lehigh University in 1982, a master's degree in engineering sciences from Harvard University in 1983, and a PhD in applied mathematics from Harvard in 1986.


Thomas A. Litzinger, PhD

Thomas A. Litzinger, PhD
Thomas A. Litzinger, PhD

ASME Fellow Thomas A. Litzinger, PhD, professor of mechanical engineering and director of the Leonhard Center for Enhancement of Engineering Education at Pennsylvania State University, has been named assistant dean for educational innovation and accreditation in the university's college of engineering. He will assume his new role on July 1. Dr. Litzinger's responsibilities will include working with the college's associate dean for education to implement strategic initiatives in undergraduate and graduate education. He also will be responsible for coordinating accreditation processes across the college. He will continue to serve as director of the Leonhard Center. Established in 1990, the center focuses on the enhancement of courses and curricula that will enable key changes required to maintain engineering education quality at Penn State. Litzinger held positions in corporate research and development at General Electric before joining Penn State in 1985. His various honors include the Penn State Engineering Alumni Society's Distinguished Service, Outstanding Research, Premier Teaching and Outstanding Teaching Awards; Penn State's Alumni Teaching Fellow Award; Penn State's Milton S. Eisenhower Award for Distinguished Teaching; and the Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering's Department Head Faculty Award. He received a bachelor's degree in nuclear engineering from Penn State in 1977, a master's degree in mechanical engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in 1981, and a doctorate degree in mechanical and aerospace engineering from Princeton University in 1986.


Jaydev P. Desai, PhD

Jaydev P. Desai, PhD
Jaydev P. Desai, PhD

ASME member Jaydev P. Desai, PhD, professor of mechanical engineering and a member of the Maryland Robotics Center at the University of Maryland, College Park (UMCP), was recently named as a Fellow of The American Society of Mechanical Engineers. The ASME Committee of Past Presidents confers the Fellow grade of membership on worthy candidates to recognize their outstanding engineering achievements. Nominated by ASME members and Fellows, an ASME member must have 10 or more years of active practice and at least 10 years of active corporate membership in ASME to become an ASME Fellow. Dr. Desai is also director of the Robotics, Automation and Medical Systems (RAMS) Laboratory, and holds a joint appointment with the Institute for Systems Research. Prior to joining UMCP, he was an associate professor at Drexel University and served as its director of the Program for Robotics, Intelligent Sensing and Mechatronics (PRISM) Laboratory. Desai is an associate editor of ASME's Journal of Mechanisms and Robotics, and recently became the founding editor-in-chief of the Journal of Medical Robotics Research (JMRR). Desai completed his undergraduate studies at the Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay, India, in 1993. He received three degrees from the University of Pennsylvania: a master's degree in mechanical engineering and applied mechanics in 1995, a master's degree in mathematics in 1997, and a PhD in mechanical engineering and applied mechanics in 1998.


Robin N. Coger, PhD

Robin N. Coger, PhD
Robin N. Coger, PhD

ASME Fellow Robin N. Coger, PhD, was recently named as a new member of the board of directors at FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology), an international K-12 not-for-profit organization that inspires young people's interest and participation in science and technology. Dr. Coger is dean of the College of Engineering and a professor of mechanical engineering at North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University (A&T) in Greensboro, N.C. The FIRST Board is comprised of a cross-section of leaders from business, government, education, industry and the sciences that have the fiduciary responsibility to provide strategic direction and oversight for all the activities of FIRST internationally. Coger's focus at North Carolina A&T ranges from advancing the global preparedness of students and highlighting the research of graduate students, to enhancing the innovation climate across the university. Prior to joining the university's faculty in 2011, Coger served as the founder and director of the Center for Biomedical Engineering and Science and was a professor in the department of mechanical engineering and engineering science at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. Her career at UNC Charlotte spanned over 15 years, where she served as a dedicated educator, researcher and administrator. Coger's research expertise is in solving design and performance problems related to tissue engineered organs, with special emphasis on liver replacement devices and their safe storage for off-the-shelf availability. North Carolina A&T serves as the North Carolina Operational Partner for FIRST LEGO League and FIRST Tech Challenge, and manages all state competitions for both programs.


James E. Hubbard, Jr., PhD

James E. Hubbard, Jr., PhD
James E. Hubbard, Jr., PhD

ASME member James E. Hubbard, Jr., PhD, the Department of Aerospace Engineering Samuel P. Langley Distinguished Professor at the University of Maryland has been named a Fellow of The American Society of Mechanical Engineers. The ASME Committee of Past Presidents confers the Fellow grade of membership on worthy candidates to recognize their outstanding engineering achievements. Nominated by ASME members and Fellows, an ASME member must have 10 or more years of active practice and at least 10 years of active corporate membership in ASME to become an ASME Fellow. Dr. Hubbard is the director of both the University of Maryland's Morpheus Laboratory and the National Institute of Aerospace's Alex Brown Center for Adaptive Aerospace Research. His career of more than 30 years has spanned both industrial and academic settings, and he has received several awards for his work, including the 2009 Smart Structures Innovation Award from the International Society for Optical Engineering and the 2002 Black Engineer of the Year President's Award from U.S. Black Engineer & Information Technology magazine. He holds 12 patents, and he has served as a member of the Air Force Studies Board, the Naval Research Advisory Committee and the Committee on Space Defense Technology. Hubbard received three mechanical engineering degrees from Massachusetts Institute of Technology: a bachelor's degree in 1977, a master's degree in 1979, and a PhD in 1982.


Fathi H. Ghorbel, PhD

Fathi H. Ghorbel, PhD
Fathi H. Ghorbel, PhD

ASME member Fathi H. Ghorbel, PhD, professor of mechanical engineering and bioengineering at Rice University, was recently named a Fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. The ASME Board of Governors confers the Fellow grade of membership on worthy candidates to recognize their outstanding engineering achievements. Nominated by their peers, ASME Fellows have had 10 or more years of active practice and at least 10 years of continuous active senior membership in ASME. In his ASME citation, Dr. Ghorbel was recognized for "fundamental contributions to nonlinear control, robot locomotion, and sensor design," resulting in five patents, more than 140 publications and two start-up companies. Ghorbel, who is also director of the Robotics and Intelligent Systems Laboratory at Rice University, is the former chair of ASME's Biomechanical Systems Panel and the IEEE Control Systems Society's Technical Committee on Manufacturing Automation and Robotic Control. The former president of the Tunisian Scientific Society, Ghorbel is a founding member and vice president of the Arab Science and Technology Foundation. He served as associate editor of ASME's Journal of Dynamic Systems, Measurement and Control, IEEE's Transactions on Control Systems Technology, and the International Journal of Robotics and Automation. Ghorbel is founder and chief technology adviser of itRobotics Inc., a company supplying the oil and gas industry with robotic technology for non-destructive pipe inspections that grew out of his Robotics and Intelligent Systems Lab at Rice University. He joined the Rice faculty in 1994, after working as a research associate at the Institut d'Automatique, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne in Switzerland from 1992 to 1994. Ghorbel received a PhD in mechanical engineering from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 1991.


Xin Zhang, PhD

Xin Zhang, PhD
Xin Zhang, PhD

ASME member Xin Zhang, PhD, professor of mechanical engineering and materials science and engineering at Boston University, was recently named a Fellow of The American Society of Mechanical Engineers. The honor, which is bestowed on longtime members who have demonstrated significant engineering achievements, recognizes Dr. Zhang's internationally renowned research using microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) to address a wide range of important problems in advanced materials, biomedicine and energy. A Boston University faculty member since 2002, Zhang leads an interdisciplinary team of researchers focused on fundamental and applied aspects of MEMS and nanotechnology. Her research group — the Laboratory for Microsystems Technology — seeks to understand and exploit interesting characteristics of micro/nanomaterials, micro/nanomechanics, and micro/nanomanufacturing technologies with forward-looking engineering efforts and practical applications ranging from energy to health care to homeland security. In 2009, Zhang was named the College of Engineering's inaugural Distinguished Faculty Fellow, a five-year appointment given to tenured engineering faculty on a clear trajectory toward an exemplary career in science and engineering. She has received numerous awards for research excellence, including the National Science Foundation Faculty CAREER Award in 2003, and has participated in U.S. and international National Academy of Engineering symposia. She has published 124 papers in interdisciplinary journals. From 1998 to 2001, she served as a postdoctoral researcher and then as a research scientist with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Zhang received her PhD in mechanical engineering from Hong Kong University of Science and Technology in 1998.


Jianmin Qu, PhD

Jianmin Qu, PhD
Jianmin Qu, PhD

ASME Fellow Jianmin Qu, PhD, an academic leader whose research in theoretical and applied mechanics has led to safer airplanes, among other advances, has been selected as the next dean of the school of engineering at Tufts University, effective Aug. 1. Dr. Qu, currently Walter P. Murphy Professor and chair of the department of civil and environmental engineering at Northwestern University, was named to the deanship after an international search. He succeeds Linda Abriola, who is stepping down after 12 years to return to the Tufts faculty. During nearly three decades, Qu has built a reputation as an accomplished scientist and an exceptional teacher, mentor and engineering leader at Northwestern and the Georgia Institute of Technology. After receiving a bachelor's degree in mathematics from Jilin University in China, Qu received master's and doctoral degrees in theoretical and applied mechanics from Northwestern. He was a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Pennsylvania for two years before joining the mechanical engineering faculty at Georgia Tech in 1989. He was promoted to full professor in 2000 and also served as associate chair and interim chair of mechanical engineering before returning to his alma mater in 2009. As a department chair at Northwestern, he has expanded the faculty by more than 25 percent and increased student enrollment by more than 30 percent. He is the co-author of two textbooks, including Fundamentals of Micromechanics of Solids, which is still used at universities around the world. A past member of the board of directors and treasurer of the Society of Engineering Sciences, Qu is a former chair, vice chair and secretary of the ASME Electronic and Photonic Packaging Division.


D. Scott Stewart, PhD

D. Scott Stewart, PhD
D. Scott Stewart, PhD

ASME member D. Scott Stewart, PhD, the Shao Lee Soo Professor at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, was recently named a Fellow of The American Society of Mechanical Engineers. The ASME Board of Governors confers the Fellow grade of membership on worthy candidates to recognize their outstanding engineering achievements. Nominated by their peers, ASME Fellows have had 10 or more years of active practice and at least 10 years of continuous active senior membership in ASME. Dr. Stewart has been a member of the department of mechanical science and engineering since 1981, when he joined the faculty as an assistant professor. He was promoted to associate professor in 1987, and full professor in 2005. His current research focuses on advanced modeling and computational modeling of complex flows for combustion and shock physics systems, addressing a wide variety of problems in combustion, detonation, and shock physics of energetic materials. He has published more than 100 articles in journals and conference proceedings, and has given nearly 100 invited lectures. A member of ASME since 2002, Stewart received a bachelor's degree in engineering science from the State University of New York at Buffalo in 1976, and his PhD in theoretical and applied science from Cornell University in 1981.


Gary Harper, PE

Gary Harper, PE
Gary Harper, PE

ASME member Gary Harper, PE, manager of system operations with the Salt River Project in Phoenix, Ariz., has been recognized by his alma mater, the University of Arizona, with the university's Alumni Achievement Award. The award, which is the highest honor the University of Arizona Alumni Association bestows, is given to alumni who have attained prominence in their field, with demonstrated service to the institution. Harper, who received his bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering from University of Arizona in 1971, has had a distinguished 40-year career in the electric utility business, having been promoted to various executive positions and managing customer service, distribution, transmission and generation departments during his 38 years at the Salt River Project. As he developed his career, he also volunteered his time with various utility industry and community organizations, in capacities including president of Arizona Blue Stake, chairman of the Arizona Electric Coordinating Council, member of the Western Electric Coordinating Council, and chair of the Desert Southwest Chapter of the Multiple Sclerosis Society. Harper's commitment to the University of Arizona has also been substantial. He has served on the UA Foundation board of directors and the Eller College of Management national board of advisors and is a member of the College of Engineering's Da Vinci Circle. Harper also is a former nine-year member of the UA Alumni Association governing board of directors, which he chaired in 2010-2011, and past president of the UA Alumni Association's Phoenix chapter.


Ranga Pitchumani, PhD

Ranga Pitchumani, PhD
Ranga Pitchumani, PhD

ASME Fellow Ranga Pitchumani, PhD, professor of mechanical engineering in the College of Engineering at the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, has been named the George R. Goodson Jr. Professor of Mechanical Engineering by the Virginia Tech Board of Visitors. Established in 1988, the professorship is presented to faculty in the department of mechanical engineering to recognize teaching and research excellence. Recipients hold the professorship for an initial period of five years that is renewable. A member of the Virginia Tech faculty since 2008, Pitchumani has made significant contributions to research and scholarship in the areas of energy conversion and energy storage technologies; advanced materials processing including polymer, composite, nano-composite, and ceramic materials; microsystems and microfabrication; uncertainty quantification; micro- and nanoscale transport processes; and bio-transport phenomena. He has written more than 195 articles in archival journals and peer-reviewed conference proceedings, edited eight book volumes and six book chapters, and is an inventor on two patents or disclosures. He is an editor for Solar Energy, past associate technical editor for the ASME Journal of Heat Transfer, and serves on the editorial boards of the Journal of Thermoplastic Composite Materials, the Journal of Composite Materials, and Frontiers in Heat and Mass Transfer. An elected member of the Connecticut Academy of Science and Engineering, Pitchumani has received several professional awards including the Young Investigator Award from the Office of Naval Research, the School of Engineering Distinguished Professorship, the School of Engineering Outstanding Junior Faculty Award, the Outstanding Mechanical Engineering Faculty Award, and the Olin Faculty Award from Olin Corp. He received his bachelor's degree from the Indian Institute of Technology in 1986, and a master's degree and PhD from Carnegie Mellon University in 1988 and 1992, respectively.


Stephen Metz, PE

Stephen Metz, PE
Stephen Metz, PE

ASME member Stephen Metz, PE, a 31-year U.S. Navy veteran, has been named vice president and executive director of Navy Programs at American Systems, a leading provider of government IT and engineering solutions. Metz will manage the company's existing business units, which focus on various U.S. Department of the Navy markets, including the Naval Undersea Warfare Center, Naval Surface Warfare Center, Naval Sea Systems Command, Space and Warfare Systems Command, and Surface Fleet Commands. Metz replaces Steve Bonwich, who is retiring after nine years leading the American Systems' Navy Programs. Metz has many years of leadership and management experience at the corporate level and in Department of Defense organizations in Washington, D.C., and in the field. Prior to joining American Systems, Metz held senior positions with QED Systems Inc., Definitive Logic, CDI-Marine and BAE Systems, after serving in the U.S. Navy. As DDG project officer, Metz managed the reconstruction and return of the USS Cole to the operational fleet following the terrorist attack on the vessel in 2000. Metz earned a bachelor's degree in marine engineering from the U.S. Naval Academy, and master's degrees from the U.S. Naval Postgraduate School and the Industrial College of the Armed Forces.


Alper Erturk, PhD

Alper Erturk, PhD
Alper Erturk, PhD

ASME member Alper Erturk, PhD, assistant professor of acoustics and dynamics at Georgia Institute of Technology, has been named the 2015 recipient of the ASME Gary Anderson Early Achievement Award. The prize is awarded by the ASME Aerospace Division to a young researcher in his or her ascendancy whose work has already had an impact in his or her field within adaptive structures and material systems. The award will be presented to Dr. Erturk during the ASME Conference on Smart Materials, Adaptive Structures and Intelligent Systems in Colorado Springs, Colo., in September. Erturk joined Georgia Tech as an assistant professor in May 2011, after working as a research scientist in the Center for Intelligent Material Systems and Structures at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. His postdoctoral research interests included theory and experiments of piezoelastic structures for applications ranging from aeroelastic energy harvesting to nonlinear vibrations of electroelastic systems. A member of ASME's J.P. Den Hertog Award Committee, Erturk received his bachelor's and master's degrees in mechanical engineering from Middle East Technical University (METU) in Ankara, Turkey, in 2004 and 2006, respectively. He received his doctorate in engineering mechanics from Virginia Tech in 2009.


Abhijit Dasgupta, PhD

Abhijit Dasgupta, PhD
Abhijit Dasgupta, PhD

ASME Fellow Abhijit Dasgupta, PhD, the Department of Mechanical Engineering Jeong H. Kim Professor at the University of Maryland (USM), has been awarded a 2015 USM Regents' Faculty Award for Excellence in Scholarship. Regents' Faculty Awards recognize distinguished performance on the part of USM faculty members. USM Regents' Faculty Awards are the highest honor presented by the Board of Regents to exemplary faculty members. The Regents will recognize this year's award recipients at a special breakfast ceremony, as well as during the public session of the full board meeting Friday, April 10, at the University of Maryland, Baltimore. Dr. Dasgupta conducts research on the mechanics of engineered, heterogeneous, active materials, with special emphasis on the micromechanics of constitutive and damage behavior, and he applies this work to multifunctional material systems such as electronic packaging material systems and smart composite material systems. For more than 20 years, Dasgupta has conducted research on Physics of Failure (PoF) approaches for developing reliable, complex multi-functional systems that perform electronic, photonic and mechanical functions, and is a researcher for the University of Maryland's Center for Advanced Life Cycle Engineering. A former associate editor of the ASME Journal of Electronic Packaging, Dasgupta has published more than 250 journal articles and conference papers on his research, presented more than 35 short workshops nationally and internationally, served on three different international journals' editorial boards, organized several national and international conferences and received six awards for his contributions in materials engineering research and education. He is the former secretary and treasurer of the ASME Electronic and Photonic Packaging Division. He received a bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology in Madras, a master's degree in mechanical engineering from Villanova University, and a PhD in theoretical and applied mechanics from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.


Zvi Rusak, PhD

Zvi Rusak, PhD
Zvi Rusak, PhD

ASME member Zvi Rusak, PhD, professor of mechanical, aerospace and nuclear engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, was recently named a Fellow of The American Society of Mechanical Engineers. Dr. Rusak was recognized for his contributions to the field of fluid mechanics, including research that informs the aerodynamic design of aircraft. The ASME Board of Governors confers the Fellow grade of membership on worthy candidates to recognize their outstanding engineering achievements. Rusak, who has published more than 250 papers, has made significant contributions to the understanding of fluid flows, the science of liquids, and gases in motion. His research applies to both aeronautical and mechanical engineering systems, including design of aircraft wings, helicopter blades, wind and hydroelectric turbines, and combustors. He has served on the Rensselaer faculty since 1991. Rusak's theoretical research has helped illuminate the vortex breakdown phenomenon, which occurs in vortex flows above airplanes and in swirling flows in pipes and nozzles of engines. He has derived a cohesive theory that explains the nature of the breakdown process in these swirling flows. In addition, his studies in transonic aerodynamics aim to design aircraft wings, to minimize their drag due to the appearance of shock waves. Other studies seek to improve the maximum lift of wings by modifying their shape to delay flow separation and stall. Rusak's publications include more than 80 archival journal papers, including papers in the field's four premier journals: the ASME Journal of Fluids Engineering, the Journal of Fluid Mechanics, the Physics of Fluids, and the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics' AIAA Journal. He formerly served on the editorial board of the ASME Journal of Fluids Engineering and currently serves on the editorial board of the AIAA Journal. Rusak received three degrees from the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, in Haifa, Israel: a bachelor's degree and a master's degree in aeronautical engineering, and a doctorate in aerospace engineering.


Laura E. Hitchcock

Laura E. Hitchcock
Laura E. Hitchcock

ASME member and dedicated ASME Standards and Certification volunteer Laura E. Hitchcock, senior project manager with the Boeing Company, will be honored by SAE International with the society's J. Cordell Breed Award for Women Leaders. Hitchcock will receive the award during an awards presentation at the SAE 2015 AeroTech Congress & Exhibition in Seattle, Wash., this September. The J. Cordell Breed Award for Women Leaders, which was established by the SAE International Women Engineers Committee, recognizes women for their contributions to the mobility industry through their service, leadership, innovation, technical skills and involvement in SAE International. In her role as senior standards specialist and corporate project manager for external standards management, strategy and policy at Boeing, Hitchcock serves as the company's enterprise-wide focal for issues regarding government, industry and international standards activities and has responsibility for external standards policy and strategy for the company. The current ASME senior vice president for Standards and Certification and chair of the Society's Council on Standards and Certification, Hitchcock has been working with standards for more than 35 years. Hitchcock also serves ASME as member of the Board on Codes & Standards Operations, member of the Board on Strategic Initiatives, and member of the Sector Management Committee. She is also a member of the board of directors for the American National Standards Institute, chair of ANSI's International Policy Committee and has served as Boeing's representative on ANSI's Company Member Forum for the past 18 years. A member of the board of directors for SAE International, chair of SAE's Aerospace Council and member of the SAE Technical Standards Board, Hitchcock is the recipient of a number of awards including the W.T. Cavanaugh Memorial Award, the Leo B. Moore Medal, the George S. Wham Leadership Medal, the ANSI Meritorious Service Award and the SAE International Outstanding Achievement Award.


Vijay Kumar, PhD

Vijay Kumar, PhD
Vijay Kumar, PhD

ASME Fellow Vijay Kumar, PhD, has been named dean of the University of Pennsylvania School of Engineering and Applied Science, effective July 1. Dr. Kumar joined the Penn Engineering faculty in 1987 and currently serves as UPS Foundation Professor with appointments in the departments of mechanical engineering and applied mechanics, computer and information science, and electrical and systems engineering. As deputy dean for education from 2008 to 2012, he was instrumental in the creation of several master's degree programs. Previously, he had served as chair of the department of mechanical engineering and applied mechanics from 2005 to 2008, as deputy dean for research from 2000 to 2004, and as director of the General Robotics, Automation, Sensing and Perception (GRASP) Laboratory from 1998-2004. From 2012 to 2014, he took a scholarly leave from Penn to serve the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy as assistant director for robotics and cyber physical systems. Kumar is world renowned for his innovative work on the development of autonomous robots and on biologically inspired algorithms for collective behavior. The editor of ASME's Journal of Mechanisms and Robotics, Kumar is the author of more than 400 refereed articles and papers and more than 20 books and book chapters. He a member of the National Academy of Engineering and a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers, as well as the recipient of numerous honors, including the National Science Foundation Presidential Young Investigator Award, Penn's Lindback Award for Distinguished Teaching, and the ASME Mechanisms and Robotics Award.


Two professors of mechanical engineering at Stanford University — Mark R. Cutkosky, PhD, and Thomas W. Kenny, PhD — were recently named Fellows of The American Society of Mechanical Engineers in recognition of their significant contributions to the field. The ASME Board of Governors confers the Fellow grade of membership on worthy candidates to recognize their outstanding engineering achievements.

Mark R. Cutkosky, PhD

Mark R. Cutkosky, PhD
Mark R. Cutkosky, PhD

Dr. Cutkosky, the Fletcher Jones Chair in the School of Engineering at Stanford, was cited for noteworthy advances in robotics and mechanical design. His work on robotic hands is recognized as especially groundbreaking, and his papers on grasping are among the most cited in the field. He is also known for his research on running and climbing robots, and for pioneering shape deposition manufacturing, a process that can design and assemble prototypes all at once. Cutkosky received a Fulbright Distinguished Chair's appointment to the Sant'Anna School of Advanced Studies in Pisa, Italy, in 2002, and a Presidential Young Investigator Award from the National Science Foundation in 1986. A member of the Stanford Bio-X interdisciplinary biosciences group, Cutkosky has advised 40 doctoral students, many of whom now hold key faculty or industry positions. Cutkosky received his bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering from the University of Rochester in 1978, and a master's degree and a PhD in mechanical engineering from Carnegie Mellon University in 1982 and 1985, respectively.


Thomas W. Kenny, PhD

Thomas W. Kenny, PhD
Thomas W. Kenny, PhD

Dr. Kenny, the Richard W. Weiland Professor at Stanford Engineering, was elected as an ASME Fellow for his significant contributions to microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) and devices, investigating both their experimental and theoretical properties. He has obtained fundamental results in measuring small forces and explaining how geckos use the van der Walls force for adhesion. Kenny has also developed MEMS-based resonators that are used for timing in electronic systems. He and his students helped modernize the clock function in electronics by replacing 75-year-old quartz technology with MEMS timing solutions that provide higher performance, smaller size, lower power demand and a lower cost. His recent work has addressed MEMS processes that enable enhanced device performance and lower-cost manufacturing. Kenny, a recipient of the National Science Foundation's CAREER Award, is a founder of Cooligy Inc., a manufacturer of cooling solutions for microprocessors, and a member of the Stanford Bio-X group. He received a PhD in physics from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1989.


Predag Hrnjak, D.Sc.

Predag Hrnjak, D.Sc.
Predag Hrnjak, D.Sc.

ASME member Predag Hrnjak, D.Sc., research professor at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign's department of mechanical science and engineering (MechSE) was recently named as a Fellow by The American Society of Mechanical Engineers. The ASME Board of Governors confers the Fellow grade of membership on worthy candidates to recognize their outstanding engineering achievements. Nominated by their peers, ASME Fellows have had 10 or more years of active practice and at least 10 years of continuous active corporate membership in ASME. Dr. Hrnjak has been part of the MechSE department since 1993, when he was a postdoctoral research associate. He is also co-director of the university's Air Conditioning and Refrigeration Center (ACRC), an industry-university cooperative research center founded by the National Science Foundation that promotes collaborative research in advanced air conditioning and refrigeration systems. Researchers at the center seek to develop more energy-efficient equipment. The center is also provides industry with a forum for sharing precompetitive research and results. Hrnjak's current research focuses on heat transfer and fluid mechanics with end-use energy conversion applications as refrigeration, heat pumps, and air conditioning. Hrnjak, who is also president of Creative Thermal Solutions Inc., has been a member of ASME since 1999. He received three mechanical engineering degrees from the University of Belgrade, Yugoslavia: a Dipl. -Ing. Degree in 1976, a master's degree in 1984, and a D.Sc. degree in 1992.


Nilanjan Sarkar, PhD

Nilanjan Sarkar, PhD
Nilanjan Sarkar, PhD

Nilanjan Sarkar, PhD, mechanical engineering professor and professor of electrical engineering and computer science at Vanderbilt University, was recently elected as a Fellow of ASME. Dr. Sarkar is a recognized expert in robotics, including developing robotic and computer technology that can aid individuals with disabilities. His current research interests include developing emotion-sensing robotic technology for use with people with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). He is also interested in developing virtual reality technology that can be used to design social tasks for people with ASD and other neuropsychological disorders, as well as new methods of quantifying human interactions during interventions using advanced technology. Sarkar and Zachary Warren, Vanderbilt associate professor of pediatrics, psychiatry and special education, developed Russell and ARIA (Adaptive Robot-Mediated Intervention Architecture), an intricate system of cameras, sensors and computers developed at Vanderbilt that helps young children diagnosed with ASD learn basic social skills. Sarkar, who leads the Robotics and Autonomous Systems Laboratory in Vanderbilt's school of engineering, is the author or co-author of 68 journal articles, 14 book chapters and more than 100 conference publications. He has served as an associate editor, a guest editor and as a member of the editorial board of several journals including the IEEE robotics journal and the ASME Transactions of Mechatronics, and Journal of Intelligent and Robotics Systems. He received a bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering from the University of Calcutta, a master's degree in mechanical engineering from the Indian Institute of Science, and a PhD in mechanical engineering and applied mechanics from the University of Pennsylvania.


Pamela A. Eibeck, PhD

Pamela A. Eibeck, PhD
Pamela A. Eibeck, PhD

ASME Fellow Pamela A. Eibeck, PhD, president of University of the Pacific, has been appointed to serve on the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I Committee on Academics. She will serve as vice chair of the committee, which will focus on advancing the association's mission of supporting student-athlete success in the classroom and on the playing field. The new committee is comprised of academic and athletics leaders from 20 other institutions of higher education, including Georgetown University, Northwestern University and Texas A&M University. The new committee replaces two previous NCAA bodies: the Committee on Academic Performance and the Academic Cabinet. Dr. Eibeck also serves as chair of the executive committee of the Association of Independent California Colleges and Universities, an organization that has represented the state's 77 private nonprofit colleges and universities since 1955. Before joining University of the Pacific, she was a member of the faculty at University of California, Berkeley; served as professor and chair of mechanical engineering, and later as vice provost for undergraduate studies, at Northern Arizona University; and was dean of the Edward E. Whitacre Jr. College of Engineering at Texas Tech University. Eibeck was the recipient of the Distinguished Engineering Educator Award in 1996 and the Boeing Outstanding Educator Award in 1999. Eibeck has served the Society as member of the Board on Engineering Education, member of the Committee on Engineering Accreditation, and as ABET/ASME program evaluator, among other positions. She received three mechanical engineering degrees from Stanford University: a bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering (with distinction) in 1979, a master's degree in 1982, and a PhD, with a minor in electrical engineering, in 1986.


Erdogan Madenci, PhD

Erdogan Madenci, PhD
Erdogan Madenci, PhD

ASME member Erdogan Madenci, PhD, professor of aerospace and mechanical engineering at the University of Arizona's College of Engineering, was recently named a Fellow of The American Society of Mechanical Engineers. He was one of 144 ASME Fellows chosen in 2014. Fellows are nominated by their peers for outstanding contributions to engineering and approved by the ASME Board of Governors. A University of Arizona faculty member since 1989, Dr. Madenci has conducted research in areas such as structural dynamics, fracture mechanics, failure analysis, and buckling of aerospace structures. In recent years, his research has focused on the emerging field of peridynamics, a theoretical framework for modeling material fracture and failure that can be more accurate than other computational methods. Madenci is currently leading a $7.5 million multidisciplinary university research project funded by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research. Based in the University of Arizona's Multi-Scale Mechanics Materials Group lab, he and his team members are applying peridynamic theory to predict failure in microchips and other electronics components for aircraft and submarines under harsh environmental and loading conditions, with the goal of identifying ways to design and build stronger and safer components. A University of Arizona College of Engineering faculty fellow and an associate fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Madenci is the lead author of three books, including Peridynamic Theory and Its Applications, and author of more than 300 research articles. He delivered a plenary presentation during the 2013 ASME International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition in San Diego, Calif.


Marcus B. Crotts, PE

Marcus B. Crotts, PE
Marcus B. Crotts, PE

ASME member Marcus B. Crotts, PE, of Winston-Salem, N.C., was recently recognized by North Carolina State University (NCSU) with the Alumni Hall of Fame Award lifetime achievement accolade from his university. The award, which recognizes career excellence, was given to Crotts by NCSU's department of mechanical and aerospace engineering and presented at university's Centennial Campus in Raleigh. Crotts, an ASME Fellow, founded the consulting firm Crotts & Saunders Engineering with his business partner Charles L. Saunders in 1956. The firm was recognized throughout the world for its impact on manufacturing processes through improved basic design methodologies in the machine tool and manufacturing industries. Crotts graduated from NCSU with a bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering in 1953, and earned master's degree in mechanical engineering from the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign in 1956. He is a registered Professional Engineer in North Carolina, South Carolina and Virginia. Crotts, a member of ASME's Carolina Section, has been an ASME member since 1953.


Gregory N. Washington, PhD

Gregory N. Washington, PhD
Gregory N. Washington, PhD

Gregory N. Washington, PhD, dean of the Samueli School of Engineering at the University of California Irvine, was recently elected as a Fellow of The American Society of Mechanical Engineers in recognition of his outstanding engineering achievements. The ASME Committee of Past Presidents confers the Fellow grade of membership on worthy candidates who have 10 or more years of active practice and at least 10 years of active corporate membership in ASME. A professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering, Dr. Washington has served as Samueli School dean since August 2011. According to the Fellow citation, Washington was recognized for earning "outstanding reputations for scholarship and education, while providing exemplary service to ASME at local and national levels." An internationally known researcher in the area of ultra-lightweight structurally active antenna systems and other structures using smart materials, he had previous served as interim dean at Ohio State University, and is the first permanent African-American dean of engineering at a University of California campus. Washington has received numerous teaching awards, instructed hundreds of undergraduates, graduated 40 graduate students, and served as an advisor to the U.S. Air Force and the National Science Foundation. Washington received three mechanical engineering degrees from North Carolina State University: a bachelor's degree in 1989, a master's degree in 1991, and a PhD in 1994.


Sheri Sheppard, PhD, PE

Sheri Sheppard, PhD, PE
Sheri Sheppard, PhD, PE

ASME Fellow Sheri Sheppard, PhD, PE, the Burton J. and Deedee McMurtry University Fellow in Undergraduate Education and professor of mechanical engineering at Stanford University, was named 2014 U.S. Professor of the Year for doctoral and research universities by the Carnegie Foundation. The U.S. Professors of the Year awards are sponsored by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching and administered by the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE). Established in 1981, the awards are designed to specifically highlight excellence in undergraduate teaching and mentoring.

Dr. Sheppard was recognized with the award for her innovative approach to teaching undergraduate students in a hands-on, problem-solving way that transforms large classes into small group learning laboratories. She received her award last month at a ceremony in Washington, D.C., along with three other professors who were similarly honored in their categories: community colleges, baccalaureate colleges and colleges that offer master's degrees. This year's winners were chosen from a pool of nearly 400 nominees and were selected by an independent panel of judges based on four criteria: impact on, and involvement with, undergraduate students; scholarly approach to teaching and learning; contributions to undergraduate education in the institution, community and profession; and support from colleagues and current and former students.

For more than 20 years, Sheppard has studied how to attract and train young engineers. This has involved initiatives sponsored by the National Science Foundation, including the Center for the Advancement of Engineering Education, and the creation of the National Center for Engineering Pathways to Innovation (Epicenter) with Stanford entrepreneurship professor Tom Byers in 2011. Sheppard received her doctorate in mechanical engineering from the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor in 1985 and joined the Stanford faculty a year later as an assistant professor, advancing to associate professor in 1993 and full professor in 2005.


Elizabeth Hsiao-Wecksler, PhD

Elizabeth Hsiao-Wecksler, PhD
Elizabeth Hsiao-Wecksler, PhD

ASME member Elizabeth Hsiao-Wecksler, PhD, an associate professor of mechanical science and engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, was recently named a Fellow of The American Society of Mechanical Engineers. The Fellow grade of membership is conferred on worthy candidates to recognize their outstanding engineering achievements. Nominated by their peers, ASME Fellows must have 10 or more years of active practice and at least 10 years of continuous active corporate membership in ASME.

Dr. Hsiao-Wecksler joined the department as an assistant professor in 2002 and became an associate professor in 2009. Her research, which seeks to improve the quality of life by improving mobility, uses methods from control theory, movement analysis, design, and dynamic systems modeling to investigate issues related to musculoskeletal biomechanics and rehabilitation engineering. In particular, her research focuses on investigating and improving movement control and function through two main areas: locomotion biomechanics and assistive device development. She received a bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering from Cornell University in 1987, a master's degree in mechanical engineering from Rochester Institute of Technology in 1994, and a PhD in mechanical engineering from the University of California, Berkeley, in 2000.


Howard Harary, PhD

Howard Harary, PhD
Howard Harary, PhD

ASME member Howard Harary, PhD, has been appointed director of the National Institute of Standards and Technology's (NIST) Engineering Laboratory, which develops the measurement tools and standards needed to support technology-intensive manufacturing, construction and cyber-physical systems. The laboratory also conducts research to reduce the risks of fire, earthquakes and other hazards. The Department of Commerce approved Dr. Harary's appointment, which became effective on Nov 3. A physicist turned measurement scientist, Harary began at NIST in 1985 as a bench scientist, focusing on challenges in measuring features on gears and other parts with complex shapes. He steadily rose through the NIST ranks, from project leader to group leader, to deputy director of the NIST Manufacturing Engineering Laboratory in 2004. Harary became the Engineering Laboratory's acting director in 2013. He currently serves on the visiting panel for the University of Maryland's Mechanical Engineering Department, is a member of The American Society of Mechanical Engineers Council on Standards and Certification, a member of the ASME Board on Standardization and Testing, and is the government representative to the board of PDES Inc., an industrial consortium working in the area of the digital exchange of manufacturing information. He also chairs an International Organization for Standardization (ISO) working group on general requirements for dimensional measuring equipment. Harary received his bachelor's degree in physics from the State University of New York at Stony Brook in 1974, and biophysics doctorate from Harvard University in 1983. He was a postdoctoral research fellow at Yale University from 1983 to 1985.


Cecilia D. Richards, PhD

Cecilia D. Richards, PhD
Cecilia D. Richards, PhD

Cecilia D. Richards, PhD, has been named a Fellow of The American Society of Mechanical Engineers for outstanding achievements in micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) power and small-scale engines. Dr. Richards was part of a team that built one of the world's smallest engines, which fits inside the hole of a Lifesaver candy and is thinner than a piece of paper. The engine was called the P3, for Palouse piezoelectric power, and was radically different in design, fabrication and operation from any existing engine. Her work has been funded by federal agencies and labs including the National Science Foundation (NSF), the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, the National Institutes of Health, and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). She received an NSF Young Investigator Award, an NRC fellowship and the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics/Gordon C. Oates Air Breathing Propulsion Award. Richards has authored more than 120 technical papers and proceedings and holds two patents. She joined the school of mechanical and materials engineering at Washington State University in 1992. She received a PhD in mechanical engineering from the University of California, Irvine in 1990, and received her bachelor's and master's degrees in mechanical engineering from the University of British Columbia in 1981 and 1985, respectively.


Siddiq Qidwai, PhD

Siddiq Qidwai, PhD
Siddiq Qidwai, PhD

Siddiq Qidwai, PhD, a mechanical engineer at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), was recently elected a Fellow of The American Society of Mechanical Engineers. The ASME Committee of Past Presidents confers the Fellow grade of membership on worthy candidates to recognize their outstanding engineering achievements. Dr. Qidwai joined NRL's Multifunctional Materials Branch of the Materials Science and Technology Division in August 2011, and in May 2013, was appointed the acting head of the System Design and Integration Section in the same branch. A recognized expert in the area of computational mechanics and materials science, his current research topics are biomechanical modeling of the human head under high-rate impacts, microstructure-sensitive modeling of corrosion, and electrically assisted deformation of metals. Qidwai first joined NRL as a contractor in the Multifunctional Materials Branch in 1999. The author or co-author of 105 publications, Qidwai is on the editorial board of the Journal of Multifunctional Composites and is an associate editor for ASME's Biomedical & Nanomedical Technology: Concise Monograph Series. Qidwai, who recently completed his two-year term as the chair of the ASME Washington D.C. Section, lead and managed ASME sponsorship and participation in five regional science and engineering fairs for middle- and high-school students as chair of his section's K-12 & College Relations Committee from 2008 to 2012. He received his doctorate and master's degree in Aerospace Engineering from Texas A&M University in 1999 and 1995, respectively, and earned his bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering from Middle East Technical University in Ankara, Turkey, in 1993.


Wenbin Yu, PhD

Wenbin Yu, PhD
Wenbin Yu, PhD

Wenbin Yu, PhD, associate professor of aeronautical and astronautical engineering at Purdue University, was also recently named as Fellow of The American Society of Mechanical Engineers. Dr. Yu's areas of research include structural mechanics (composite/smart/multifunctional structures), micromechanics (composite/smart/multifunctional materials), multi-physics modeling, flexible multi-body dynamics, and multi-scale modeling. He also is the chief technology officer of AnalySwift, a company that markets and licenses the technologies developed in Yu's group. He has authored more than 140 refereed technical articles and developed several computer codes which are being extensively used in many government labs, universities, research institutes and companies. His research has been funded by both federal agencies and private industry. Yu received his Bachelor of Science degree in hydraulic engineering at the North China University of Water Conservancy and Electric Power in 1995. He received two M.S. degrees: one in engineering mechanics from Tsinghua University in Beijing in 1998, and one in aerospace engineering from Georgia Institute of Technology in 2000. His 2002 PhD in aerospace engineering also is from Georgia Tech.


J. Parker Lamb, Jr., PhD

J. Parker Lamb, Jr., PhD
J. Parker Lamb, Jr., PhD

ASME Fellow J. Parker Lamb, Jr., PhD, retired mechanical engineering department chair at the University of Texas at Austin, has been selected to receive the 2014 Engineer-Historian Award from the ASME History and Heritage Committee at the ASME Central Texas Section meeting on Nov. 20. The Engineer-Historian Award, which was established in 1990 by the ASME History and Heritage Committee, honors an outstanding published work or works by an engineer dealing with the history of mechanical engineering, and is intended to encourage the active interest by mechanical engineers in the history of their profession. Read more about the award here. Dr. Lamb, who was a founding member of the Central Texas Section, is being recognized with the award for his two books, Perfecting the American Steam Locomotive (Railroads Past and Present) and Evolution of the American Diesel Locomotive. The works, according to ASME History and Heritage Chair Richard Pawliger, “examine the evolutionary manner in which both of these technologies developed … not solely major changes, but several minor improvements, from his perspective as an engineer.” Lamb, the author of eight books on engineering and transportation, served as assistant professor of aerospace engineering and engineering mechanics and assistant professor of mechanical engineering at the university before becoming chair of the mechanical engineering department from 1970 to 1976, and then again from 1996 to 2001. He was awarded with the title of Professor Emeritus in 2001. Lamb received a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering in 1954 from Auburn University, and his Ph.D. in 1961 from the University of Illinois.


Lauren Schultz

Lauren Schultz
Lauren Schultz

ASME student member Lauren Schultz was named the University of Cincinnati College of Engineering and Applied Science Engineer of the Month for October. Schultz maintains a 4.0 GPA in the mechanical engineering Accelerated Engineering Degree (ACCEND) program. Through the ACCEND program, which combines a five-year bachelor's degree track with a master's degree, Schultz will earn her bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering and an MBA, all in five years. In addition to the accelerated bachelor's and MBA degrees, Lauren also has a co-op placement at GE Aviation, which she says, "has been very valuable in the fact that I already have over a year of professional, engineering experience." While Schultz has spent all five co-op rotations with GE Aviation, she has worked in five different areas of the company, which she says will leave her better prepared to enter the workforce when she graduates from UC in May 2015. During her time at the University of Cincinnati, Schulz has also been an active member of the school's ASME student chapter, and has served as its president since 2013.


G.P. (Bud) Peterson, PhD, PE

G.P. (Bud) Peterson, PhD, PE
G.P. (Bud) Peterson, PhD, PE

The White House has reappointed Georgia Institute of Technology President G.P. (Bud) Peterson, PhD, PE, to the National Science Board (NSB), the policymaking body for the National Science Foundation. Dr. Peterson, who is an ASME Fellow, was first appointed to the NSB in 2008 by President George W. Bush. Peterson has served as the chair of the Audit and Oversight Committee charged with ensuring that the National Science Foundation is properly evaluating and managing its operational risks. Since becoming president of Georgia Tech in 2009, Peterson has strengthened the school's leadership position in innovation, expanded strategic partnerships, and championed leadership in education and research. He also holds the position of professor of mechanical engineering at Georgia Tech. Throughout his career, Peterson has played an active role in helping establish the national education and research agendas, serving on numerous industry, government and academic task forces and committees. He served as the chancellor and professor of mechanical engineering at the University of Colorado-Boulder from 2006 to 2009, and was provost of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute from 2000 to 2006. For 19 years, Peterson served in various leadership roles at Texas A&M University, including associate vice chancellor and executive associate dean of engineering from 1996 to 2000. Peterson has worked as a research scientist at NASA and at the National Science Foundation. In 2011, President Obama appointed him to the Advanced Manufacturing Partnership steering committee and in September 2013 appointed him to the AMP 2.0 steering committee. Peterson is a fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) and received the institute's Distinguished Service Award in 2011. He earned B.S. degrees in mechanical engineering and mathematics and an M.S. in engineering from Kansas State University, and a Ph. D. in mechanical engineering from Texas A&M University.


Vadim Shapiro, PhD

Vadim Shapiro, PhD
Vadim Shapiro, PhD

ASME Fellow Vadim Shapiro, PhD, the Bernard A. and Frances M. Weideman Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Computer Sciences at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, was recently named the winner of the 2014 Design Automation Award from the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. The award, which was presented at the ASME International Design and Engineering Technical Conferences & Computers and Information in Engineering Conference (IDETC/CIE) in Buffalo, N.Y., recognizes sustained meritorious contribution to research in design automation. Shapiro was selected to receive the award based on a number of groundbreaking contributions he has made in the area. His research is in the foundational issues in computer-aided engineering that span three interacting concentration areas: geometric modeling, physical modeling and simulation, and computational design, and are at the very core of design automation. He has developed new geometric modeling representations that overcome critical bottlenecks in CAD technology that have affected the architecture of most CAD systems in use today. Shapiro, who was the General Motors Fellow at Cornell University's computer science department, joined the University of Wisconsin-Madison as a staff research engineer in 1992, before advancing from assistant professor of mechanical engineering and computer sciences in 1994 to professor in 2003. Shapiro earned bachelor's degrees in mathematics and computer science from New York University in 1981, a master's degree in computer science from the University of California, Los Angeles in 1983, and second master's degree in mechanical engineering from Cornell University in 1989. He received his doctorate in mechanical engineering from Cornell University in 1991.


Nicole Abaid

Nicole Abaid
Nicole Abaid

ASME member Nicole Abaid, an assistant professor with the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University Department of Biomedical Engineering and Mechanics, has been selected as one of Popular Science magazine's 2014 Brilliant 10, which is featured in the October 2014 issue. Abaid, who joined the Virginia Tech faculty in 2012, studies how animals — most prominently bats — swarm in order to gain insights on improving the control of multi-agent systems, such as underwater robotic vehicle teams that rely on sonar. Abaid, who collaborates with her colleague Rolf Mueller, associate professor of mechanical engineering, said her research looks at "collective behavior in groups that use active sensing — sensing that relies on a self-generated signal, such as sonar or radar — inspired by bat swarms." The ability of bats to fly in a swarm without the danger of collision is seen as key in building underwater vehicles and other robotics systems that can operate in a similar fashion. Abaid is working on an algorithm of this behavior using echolocation for sensing which is being validated against data collected from wild bats swarms at the Shandong University-Virginia Tech International Laboratory, located in China. Abaid, Mueller, and their research teams will then build a team of robotic ground vehicles that can mimic the ultrasound of a bat swarm and avoid not only collision, but jamming, by using bat-inspired behavioral and sensing strategies. Abaid received a bachelor's degree from University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and a master's degree from University of Kansas, both in mathematics, and a doctorate in mechanical engineering from Polytechnic Institute of New York University. Her awards include a Best Student Paper award that she received at the 2011 American Society of Mechanical Engineers' Dynamic Systems and Control Conference.


T. Agami Reddy, PhD, PE

T. Agami Reddy, PhD, PE
T. Agami Reddy, PhD, PE

T. Agami Reddy, PhD, PE, an ASME Fellow and a professor at Arizona State University, was awarded the 2014 Yellott Award by the Solar Energy Division of The American Society of Mechanical Engineers. The award was presented during the 8th International Conference on Energy Sustainability, which was held June 30-July 2 in Boston. The highest award of the Solar Energy Division, the Yellott Award honors the professor John Yellott, an internationally recognized scientist who worked on the Manhattan Project and the division's first chair. The award, which is given every two years, recognizes outstanding service to the division and significant contributions to solar energy engineering through research, publication and education. Dr. Reddy, the SRP Professor of Energy and Environment in Arizona State's Design School within the Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts, was selected this year for his dedicated and productive research career in solar thermal energy and energy efficiency in buildings, for his dedication to training students in energy sustainability, and for his extensive service and leadership to the ASME Solar Energy Division. Reddy is also a professor in the School of Sustainable Engineering and the Built Environment, one of the Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering. He holds a courtesy appointment in the School for Engineering of Matter, Transport and Energy, and is a senior sustainability scientist in the Julie Ann Wrigley Global Institute of Sustainability. A founding chair of ASME's Conference on Energy Sustainability, Reddy has held a number of Society positions, including chair of the Frank Kreith Energy Award Committee, and chair, vice chair and secretary of the Solar Energy Division.


Kristen L. Billiar, PhD

Kristen L. Billiar, PhD
Kristen L. Billiar, PhD

ASME Fellow Kristen L. Billiar, PhD, a professor of biomedical engineering and mechanical engineering and director of the Tissue Mechanics and Mechanobiology Laboratory at Worcester Polytechnic Institute, served as a liaison for ASME at the World Congress of Biomechanics, which was held in Boston in July. Dr. Billiar helped organize a number of sessions at the six-day conference, which drew more than 4,000 engineers, biologists, mathematicians, physicists, computer scientists, chemists, and scientists from around the world to participate in 400 sessions covering a range of topics, from basic biology to recent technological developments in biomechanics. Billiar is a member of the ASME Bioengineering Division's executive committee. He received a bachelor's degree in mechanical and aerospace engineering from Cornell University, a master's degree and doctorate in bioengineering from the University of Pennsylvania. Billiar is a member of the ASME Bioengineering Division's executive committee. He received a bachelor's degree in mechanical and aerospace engineering from Cornell University, a master's degree and doctorate in bioengineering from the University of Pennsylvania.


Ratneshwar (Ratan) Jha, PhD

Ratneshwar (Ratan) Jha, PhD
Ratneshwar (Ratan) Jha, PhD

Ratneshwar (Ratan) Jha, PhD, the director of the Raspet Flight Research Laboratory at Mississippi State University, was recently named a Fellow of The American Society of Mechanical Engineers. Dr. Jha, who has earned international recognition for his work in health micro-aerial vehicles, and composites and smart structures, has served as chair, co-chair or technical chair for several ASME Aerospace Division conferences. Before joining the Mississippi State faculty in 2012, Jha taught at Clarkson University in Potsdam, N.Y., where he developed the Smart Structures Laboratory and received the university's John Graham Faculty Research Award. Jha received a bachelor's degree in aeronautical engineering at the Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur. He also holds a master's degree in aerospace engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology and a doctoral degree in mechanical engineering from Arizona State University.


Rahul Gupta, PhD

Rahul Gupta, PhD
Rahul Gupta, PhD

Rahul Gupta, PhD, a research mechanical engineer and expert in blast-dynamic effect on structures and development of blast-resistant/energy-absorbing structures at the U.S. Army Research Laboratory, was recently elected as a Fellow of ASME. Gupta, a resident of Hockessin, Del., just ended a 12-month assignment as a technical assistant to the director of ARL's Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, where he studied the organization's business processes and functions as a key member of that section director's cabinet. He has returned to the laboratory's Protection Division to join the Warrior Injury Assessment Manikin Project. The test dummy was created as a soldier surrogate designed to meet realistic operational nuances to study and biomedically validate assessment tools monitoring human response during live-fire test and evaluation, and human response in a number of military-vehicle tests. Prior to this current assignment, Gupta served as project lead for the numerical modeling and simulation encompassing blast, structural, and crew response for MaxxPro and MaxxPro DASH Mine Resistant and Ambush Protected (MRAP) vehicles used in Iraq and Afghanistan. Gupta received an ARL Special Act Award for the development of enhanced underbody protection and seating for the U.S. Army Stryker vehicle. He is also the Army Collaboration Team of the Year Award recipient for the High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle (HMMWV) Improvement Program. In addition to these awards, Gupta has co-authored a book on nanotechnology and been appointed as an adjunct faculty member at the University of Maryland, College Park.


Philip LeDuc, PhD

Philip LeDuc, PhD
Philip LeDuc, PhD

Philip LeDuc, PhD, the William J. Brown Professor of Mechanical Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University, was recently elected as an ASME Fellow. LeDuc is the founding director of the university's Center for the Mechanics of Engineering Cellular Systems (CMECS). Comprised of more than 20 faculty members from engineering, biology, chemistry, physics and computer science, CMECS has the goal of using mechanical engineering with cellular systems to address biological problems ranging from disease to bioenergy to malnutrition in third-world countries. Dr. LeDuc also served on the panel requested by the U.S. Senate and House of Representatives for Research that resulted in the report "Rising above the Gathering Storm." He was an invited attendee at the Frontiers of Engineering Symposium, which was held by the National Academy of Engineering (NAE), and the Global Grand Challenges Summit, which was organized by NAE, the Royal Academy of Engineering, and the national engineering academy of China. He was a member of the organizing committee for NAE's 2008 India-American Frontiers of Engineering. LeDuc is the recipient of the National Science Foundation CAREER Award and the Beckman Foundation Young Investigator Award, as well as a number of honors from Carnegie Mellon, including the George Tallman Ladd Research Award, the Russell V. Trader Career Faculty Fellow, and the Benjamin Richard Teare Teaching Award. He is a member of the National Research Council Roundtable on Biomedical Engineering Materials and Applications, and Fellow of the Biomedical Engineering Society and the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering.


Two ASME members, Peter Lillehoj, PhD, and Nizar Lajnef, PhD, were recently named as 2014 Academy for Global Engagement Fellows at Michigan State University. The fellowship program is for early- to mid-career, tenure-track faculty with the university's College of Engineering and College of Agriculture and Natural Resources. Fellows will take part in monthly seminars related to enhancing their capabilities and networks, and receive help identifying funding resources and establishing global networks of collaborators to further their research.

Peter Lillehoj, PhD

Peter Lillehoj, PhD
Peter Lillehoj, PhD

Dr. Lillehoj is an assistant professor in the university's department of mechanical engineering. His research interests include bioMEMS, nanotechnology, microfluidics, biosensors, and point-of-care diagnostics; microsystems for current and emerging applications in clinical diagnosis; biosecurity and food and water safety; simple and low-cost technologies for sample preparation and bioprocessing; and innovative approaches to manufacture of disposable biosensors for global healthcare diagnostics. Lillehoj received his bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering from Johns Hopkins University in 2006. He received his master's and PhD degrees in mechanical engineering from the University of California, Los Angeles, in 2007 and 2011, respectively.


Nizar Lajnef, PhD

Nizar Lajnef, PhD
Nizar Lajnef, PhD

Dr. Lajnef is an assistant professor in the department of civil and environmental engineering at Michigan State. His research interests include design and implementation of a smart continuous-monitoring system for asphalt and concrete pavement structures; design and implementation of sub-microwatt, self-powered fatigue sensors; sensors design for civil infrastructure and biomechanical systems; and smart materials/composites/alloys and systems. He received his PhD in civil engineering from Michigan State University in 2008.


Lorraine G. Olson, PhD

Lorraine G. Olson, PhD
Lorraine G. Olson, PhD

ASME Fellow Lorraine G. Olson, PhD, was recently appointed head of the department of mechanical engineering at Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology by Phillip J. Cornwell, PhD, vice president for academic affairs. The mechanical engineering department has the largest student enrollment at the university. Dr. Olson joined the faculty as a professor in 2002, after serving as interim head of the department of engineering mechanics at the University of Nebraska. She received the Rose-Hulman Board of Trustees' Outstanding Scholar Award in 2013, and is a strong advocate for student undergraduate research endeavors. She is one of the faculty co-founders for the institute's Independent Projects and Research Opportunities Program. Olson is an expert at applying finite element methodologies to non-traditional areas, such as ultrasonic cleaning of semiconductor wafers, laser welding, online machine tool monitoring, rotational molding of polymers, wear-resistant coatings, and inverse electrocardiography. She is working with two Rose-Hulman colleagues and several students on a research project, supported by the National Science Foundation, focusing on using inverse problems in the early detection of breast cancer. During her career, Olson has authored or co-authored one book chapter, 40 journal articles, and 92 conference papers, presentations and reports. She earned her bachelor's, master's, and doctoral degrees in mechanical engineering at Massachusetts Institute of Technology.


Terry Baughn, PhD, PE

Terry Baughn, PhD, PE
Terry Baughn, PhD, PE

Terry Baughn, PhD, PE, a senior lecturer in mechanical engineering at the University of Texas at Dallas, has been named Engineer of the Year by the North Texas section of The American Society of Mechanical Engineers. Dr. Baughn was honored earlier this year at the Texas Society of Professional Engineers honors banquet. Baughn retired as an engineering fellow in 2012 after 23 years with Raytheon Co. in the space and airborne systems area. He joined the Erik Jonsson School of Engineering and Computer Science in fall of 2013. In the Jonsson School, Baughn teaches a class on the advanced strength of materials and design of machine elements, mentors several teams of capstone senior design students, and serves as a career advisor to students near graduation. Baughn received his bachelor's and master's degrees from Purdue University, and earned his doctorate at the University of Delaware. He worked at General Motors and the International Harvester truck group before joining the faculty of Southern Methodist University. In 1989, he joined the Texas Instruments Defense Systems Equipment Group, which was purchased by Raytheon in 1997. Baughn is a Fellow of ASME and has served the Society's North Texas section in various roles, including secretary, treasurer, vice chair and chair. He is a registered professional engineer in Texas.


Nagi Naganathan, PhD

Nagi Naganathan, PhD
Nagi Naganathan, PhD

ASME Fellow Nagi Naganathan, PhD, has been appointed interim president of the University of Toledo. Dr. Naganathan, dean of the university's college of engineering, began his term July 1. Naganathan is the author and co-author of more than 100 publications in peer-reviewed journals and national and international conference proceedings, and as a principal and co-principal investigator has secured more than $6 million in sponsored research from outside agencies. He also has been awarded a U.S. patent on the use of piezoelectric devices in active suspension systems. Naganathan's work with industry includes conducting vibration analysis and control studies on heavy-duty truck powertrains. Naganathan earned his bachelor's degree with honors in mechanical engineering from India's National Institute of Technology at Tiruchirappalli, University of Madras; a master's degree in mechanical and industrial engineering from Clarkson University in Potsdam, N.Y.; and a PhD in mechanical engineering from Oklahoma State University. He is the recipient number of prestigious awards, including The American Society of Mechanical Engineers Outstanding Regional Faculty Advisor Award, the Society of Automotive Engineers Ralph R. Teetor Educational Award, the Technical Society of Toledo/Toledo Society of Professional Engineers Engineer of the Year, and the Distinguished Alumnus Award from his alma mater, the National Institute of Technology in Tiruchirappalli, India.


Veera P. Rajendran, PhD

Veera P. Rajendran, PhD
Veera P. Rajendran, PhD

ASME Fellow Veera P. Rajendran, PhD, has been named director of engineering at Equipment Technologies, Mooresville, Ind., manufacturer of Apache-brand agricultural sprayers. Dr. Rajendran, will lead the company's product development, design and improvement initiatives. He has 20 years of experience in mechanical engineering and technology development, including the past nine years at Rolls-Royce Corp. of Indianapolis, where he served as chief of research and technology programs and strategy in the company's aerospace division. Rajendran had previously served as the Rolls-Royce's manager of turbine thermal design and, earlier, as senior engineer of aero-thermal design. Before joining Rolls-Royce, he was a senior research engineer at General Electric. Rajendran holds five U.S. patents, and has received a number of honors, including the GE Managerial Award and the GE Golden Quill Award for research publications, among others. Rajendran received a bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering from Coimbatore Institute of Technology in India in 1987, and a master's degree in mechanical engineering from the University of Mississippi in 1994. He earned a doctorate in mechanical engineering from the University of Iowa in 1998, and an MBA with a Leadership concentration from Butler University in 2013.


Gina Lee-Glauser, PhD

Gina Lee-Glauser, PhD
Gina Lee-Glauser, PhD

ASME Fellow Gina Lee-Glauser, PhD, vice president for research at Syracuse University, testified at a June 12 hearing entitled "Reducing the Administrative Workload for Federally Funded Research," conducted jointly by the House Science Subcommittee on Oversight and the Subcommittee on Research and Technology. The hearing examined concerns raised in a recent National Science Board (NSB) report on how to minimize regulations and increase effectiveness of federally funded research universities. The NSB report outlined concerns raised by educational institutions about the workload associated with applying for and receiving federal funds for research. The report cited a statistic that on average, researchers spend 42 percent of their application time on meeting administrative requirements. Dr. Lee-Glauser and the other witnesses at the hearing discussed the findings of multiple reports and explored ways to minimize the red tape that has become pervasive in academia. In her testimony, Lee-Glauser observed, “At Syracuse, our principal investigators are spending considerable time revising and resubmitting applications in order to get just one funded. The success rates of research programs to which SU faculty apply, including the National Science Foundation and the National Institutes of Health, are now in the single digits. Disturbingly, there is likely no meaningful difference in quality or the potential impact between funded applications and the next tier of non-funded applications. So in addition to the time lost by researchers in preparing revised applications, the pace of innovation and of knowledge creation is delayed.” For more information about the NSB report, visit www.nsf.gov/nsb/publications/pub_summ.jsp?ods_key=nsb1418.


Xinwei Wang, PhD

Xinwei Wang, PhD
Xinwei Wang, PhD

ASME member Xinwei Wang, PhD, professor of mechanical engineering at Iowa State University, was recently elected a Fellow of ASME for his contributions in the fields of micro/nanoscale thermal probing and characterization, and laser-material interaction. Dr. Wang, who has been a member of ASME for 15 years, has given invited talks at conferences and helped organize conferences in the areas of thermal science and heat transfer. One of Wang's newest areas of research is thermal/electrical transport in metallic films. He has also developed new techniques for thermal characterization at the micro- and nanoscale. This research can be used for a wide variety of applications, such as measuring thermal conductivity in textiles. A longtime research area for Wang has been laser-material interaction. This is mainly divided into two categories: simulation, which focuses on describing how a laser interacts with the material it comes into contact with, and experiments in nanomanufacturing. One of Wang's new projects, which started last December, is investigating thermal transport in nuclear materials. The project, which is a collaboration with the Idaho National Laboratory, will last three years and is funded by the Department of Energy. The research will focus on achieving in-pile characterization for monitoring the evolution of thermal properties, in order to optimize fuel designs that offer improvements in safety and efficiency. Wang is the author of 88 journal articles, one book, and three book chapters.


Robert Leishear, PhD

Robert Leishear
Robert Leishear, PhD

ASME member Robert Leishear, PhD, a fellow engineer with the U.S. Department of Energy's Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was recently elected as a Fellow of The American Society of Mechanical Engineers. Fellows are nominated by their peers and selected by a committee based on the candidate's engineering achievements. Dr. Leishear has authored or co-authored 52 publications, including articles for Mechanical Engineering magazine, the Mensa World Journal and various conference and honors journal proceedings on failure analysis, fluid flow, structural dynamics, explosions, pump design and mixing. He has also authored a textbook published by ASME Press, titled Fluid Mechanics, Water Hammer, Dynamic Stresses and Piping Design. He has taught classes from his book to hundreds of engineers and operators at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina and continues to teach classes through ASME. His publications documented numerous cost savings, including a $27 million team savings through the Six Sigma process. Leishear has a bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering from Johns Hopkins University, and both a master's degree and a PhD in mechanical engineering from the University of South Carolina. He has worked at SRNL since 2006. Prior to joining SRNL, he worked in a number of engineering and construction positions at the Savannah River Site, including 15 years within the SRS high level waste program.


Kimberly L. Turner, PhD

Kimberly L. Turner, PhD
Kimberly L. Turner, PhD

ASME member Kimberly L. Turner, PhD, professor of mechanical engineering at the University of California, Santa Barbara, was recently elected as a Fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. Turner's research encompasses the topics of micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS), micromachines that function largely as sensors or devices that convert one form of energy to another. One current project involves the combination of MEMS and biomimicry, wherein a synthetic controllable adhesive is being developed using the gecko's ability to stick to a variety of surfaces, as a model. In addition to being recognized for her major contributions in the area of MEMS, Turner was also acknowledged for her extensive service to her professional community. She has served ASME in numerous leadership roles for technical committees, in the organization of conferences and also as chair of the ASME MEMS Division. Turner was a recipient of the UCSB Academic Senate Distinguished Teaching Award in 2005, and became one of the youngest faculty members to be named chair of the Department of Mechanical Engineering in 2008. Last year, she received the Academic Senate Graduate Mentor Award. An inventor on seven U.S. patents and an author of more than 80 peer-reviewed articles, Turner was also the recipient of the National Science Foundation's CAREER award and is a member of the Society for Experimental Mechanics, the American Society for Engineering Education and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. She also serves as a consultant for leading micro-systems companies.


Dean Kamen

Dean Kamen
Dean Kamen

The first prosthetic arm able to respond to multiple simultaneous commands from the brain was approved for sale by the Food and Drug Administration earlier this month. The device was developed by ASME member Dean Kamen and his company DEKA Research and Development Corp. as a project for the U.S government's Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA). A celebrated entrepreneur, innovator, and advocate for science and technology, Kamen holds more than 440 U.S. and foreign patents, and is the inventor of a number of notable devices, including the first wearable infusion pump, the HomeChoice dialysis system, the iBOT mobility device, and the Segway Human Transporter. He is also founder of the FIRST (For Inspiration of Science and Technology) organization, which is dedicated to motivating young people to understand and value science and technology. Kamen was awarded the National Medal of Technology by in 2000 and the Lemelson-MIT Prize in 2002, and was inducted into the National Inventors Hall of Fame in 2005. Kamen was the recipient of ASME's highest award, the ASME Medal, in 2007, as well as the Society's Ralph Coats Roe Medal in 2002 and Edwin F. Church Medal in 1997.


Gül Kremer, Ph.D.

Gül Kremer, Ph.D.
Gül Kremer, Ph.D.

ASME member Gül Kremer, Ph.D., professor of engineering design and industrial engineering at Pennsylvania State University, was recently named a Fellow of ASME. Dr. Kremer was cited for her research in engineering design and education, which "has had a profound impact on a generation of students and practitioners all over the world"; techniques to improve student design team experiences and bring research on engineering design to the classroom; contributions to three books on engineering design and numerous research papers; and leadership in the ASME Design Engineering Division and the Division of Undergraduate Education at the National Science Foundation, "defining the future direction of engineering education research." Kremer's research focuses on developing tools and methods for the early stages in the engineering design process, understanding human and social dynamics in design contexts and developing and investigating innovation/problem solving enabling methods. A Penn State faculty member since 2000, Kremer previously held a faculty appointment at the Gebze Institute of Technology in Turkey as well as visiting appointments at Sabanci University and Istanbul University. She was awarded a Fulbright Scholar grant during the 2010-11 academic year. Kremer received her bachelor's and master's degrees in industrial engineering from Yildiz Technical University; Istanbul, Turkey; a master of business administration from Istanbul University; and a doctorate in engineering management and systems engineering from the University of Missouri-Rolla.


William W. Durgin, Ph.D., P.E.

William W. Durgin, Ph.D., P.E.
William W. Durgin, Ph.D., P.E.

ASME Fellow William W. Durgin, Ph.D., P.E., provost, vice president of academic affairs and professor of engineering at the State University of New York Institute of Technology (SUNYIT) in Utica, will present a lecture on the topic of electrical airplanes at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, May 14, in the room A129 of the university's Kunsela Hall. The lecture, to be hosted by Utica Chapter of the Experimental Aircraft Association, is open to the public. Dr. Durgin's lecture, "The Electric Airplane is Now a Reality," will explore advances in battery and motor technology that have enabled electric general aviation aircraft to be designed, built and sold. ASME Fellow William W. Durgin, Ph.D., P.E., provost, vice president of academic affairs and professor of engineering at the State University of New York Institute of Technology (SUNYIT) in Utica, will present a lecture on the topic of electrical airplanes at 7:00 p.m. on Wednesday, May 14, in room A129 of the university's Kunsela Hall. The lecture, to be hosted by the Utica Chapter of the Experimental Aircraft Association, is open to the public. Dr. Durgin's lecture, "The Electric Airplane is Now a Reality," will explore advances in battery and motor technology that have enabled electric general aviation aircraft to be designed, built and sold. Benefits of this technology include reliability, quietness, safety and economy, according to the association. During his lecture, Durgin will discuss the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics electric airplane design competition, as well as the NASA/CAFE Green Flight Challenge, which was won by an electric aircraft achieving more than 400 passenger mpg equivalent. Prior to joining the SUNYIT faculty, Durgin was the provost at California Polytechnic Institute, where he led the Electric Airplane Project Team that won the AIAA competition. A Fellow of ASME and AIAA, Durgin was a member of the ASME Committee on Honors from 2003-2010, and served as chair of the committee from 2007-2009.


Hisham Hegab, Ph.D., P.E.

Hisham Hegab, Ph.D., P.E.
Hisham Hegab, Ph.D., P.E.

ASME member Hisham Hegab, Ph.D., P.E., professor of mechanical, nanosystems and cyber engineering and a 1989 graduate of Louisiana Tech University, has been named the new dean of the school's College of Engineering and Science. Effective July 1 and pending approval from the University of Louisiana System's Board of Supervisors, Dr. Hegab will take over for Stan Napper, who became vice president for research and development in July. Hegab joined Louisiana Tech's faculty in 1995 and has served as an academic director for the computer science, electrical engineering, electrical engineering technology and nanosystems engineering programs. He also served as associate dean of undergraduate studies in the College of Engineering and Science before serving as its interim dean for the 2013-2014 academic year. During his tenure as interim dean, Hegab was credited with successfully concluding the college's campaign for a new Integrated Engineering and Science Education building. The new 60,000-square-foot facility will double the college's classroom space, provide new faculty office spaces, and provide a new 250-seat auditorium. In addition to being a member of ASME, Hegab is a member of the American Society of Engineering Education and the Tau Beta Pi Engineering Honor Society and is a Registered Professional Engineer in the State of Louisiana. During his tenure at Louisiana Tech, he has earned a number of honors, including the Louisiana Engineering Foundation Engineering Faculty Professionalism Award, the Louisiana Tech University Engineering Science Foundation Service Award, and the Louisiana Tech University College of Engineering and Science Outstanding Achievement in Education Award.


Ajay Prasad, Ph.D.

Ajay Prasad, Ph.D.
Ajay Prasad, Ph.D.

ASME Fellow Ajay Prasad, Ph.D., was recently named a College of Engineering Alumni Distinguished Professor at the University of Delaware. Dr. Prasad, who joined the University of Delaware faculty in 1992, is known for his role in developing clean energy technologies and programs at the university to meet the energy needs of the United States. As director of the university's Center for Fuel Cell Research, he coordinates the efforts of University of Delaware faculty members and companies working to make fuel cell components and systems cheaper and more durable for large-scale manufacturing and implementation. Prasad also directs the school's Fuel Cell Bus Program, which currently operates two 22-foot hydrogen fuel cell powered transit buses on campus. In this role, he is leading efforts to improve Delaware's hydrogen infrastructure activities. His other research interests include energy-efficient buildings, wind and ocean current energy and vehicle-to-grid technology. In addition to being an ASME Fellow and an internationally recognized scholar, Prasad is a member of the American Physical Society and the American Society of Engineering Education. He serves on the University of Delaware Energy Institute's Council of Fellows and the Steering Committee of the Center for Carbon-Free Power Integration, and he chairs the University of Delaware-Gamesa Wind Consortium Research Committee. Prasad is an executive committee member for the Delaware Center for Transportation, the research arm of the Delaware Department of Transportation, and he serves on the city of Newark's Conservation Advisory Commission and the state of Delaware's Green and Better Building Advisory Committee. He is the author of more than 100 journal papers and book chapters, and he holds five patents.


John A. Rogers, Ph.D.

John A. Rogers, Ph.D.
John A. Rogers, Ph.D.

ASME member John A. Rogers, Ph.D., the Swanlund Professor of Materials Science and Engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, has been elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, one of the longest-standing honorary societies in the United States. Dr. Rogers, the director of the Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, has pioneered flexible, stretchable electronics, creating pliable products such as cameras with curved retinas, medical monitors in the form of temporary tattoos, a soft sock that can wrap an arrhythmic heart in electronic sensors, and LED strips thin enough to be implanted directly into the brain to illuminate neural pathways. His work in photovoltaics serves as the basis for commercial modules that hold the current world record in efficiency. Rogers is affiliated with the university's Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology and holds joint appointments in the departments of bioengineering, chemistry, electrical and computer engineering, and mechanical science and engineering. He served as the director of a Nanoscale Science and Engineering Center on nanomanufacturing, funded by the National Science Foundation, 2009-2012. His honors include ASME Robert Henry Thurston Award in 2013, the 2013 American Ingenuity Award in physical sciences from Smithsonian Magazine, a Lemelson-MIT Prize for outstanding mid-career inventors in 2011, and a $500,000 MacArthur Foundation "genius" fellowship in 2009. He has been elected to the National Academy of Engineering and has been named a fellow of the Institute for Electrical and Electronics Engineers, the American Physical Society, the Materials Research Society and the American Association for the Advancement of Science.


Two aerospace engineering faculty members from Texas A&M University — ASME Fellows Helen Reed, Ph.D., and Dimitris Lagoudas, Ph.D. — were recently selected as recipients of the 2014 Texas A&M University Association of Former Students Distinguished Achievement Award. Dr. Reed was recognized for achievement in teaching, while Dr. Lagoudas was honored for his research activities.

Helen Reed, Ph.D.

Helen Reed, Ph.D.
Helen Reed, Ph.D.

Reed, a professor in the university's aerospace engineering department, is Regents Professor, Presidential Professor for Teaching Excellence, director of the AggieSat Lab Satellite Program and director of the Computational Stability and Transition Group. She joined the Texas A&M faculty in 2004 and served as department head for four years before returning to teaching and research on a full-time basis. Widely regarded as an expert in hypersonics, energy-efficient aircraft and small satellite design, Reed has led research projects totaling millions of dollars and is a member of the National Research Council's Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board. She has received numerous professional awards and honors, including Fellow grade in ASME, the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA), and the American Physical Society. She received the Atwood Award from American Society for Engineering Education and AIAA, and she was inducted into Academy of Engineering Excellence at Virginia Tech, which is her alma mater.


Dimitris Lagoudas, Ph.D.

Dimitris Lagoudas, Ph.D.
Dimitris Lagoudas, Ph.D.

Lagoudas, a professor of aerospace engineering, is associate vice chancellor for engineering research for the Texas A&M University System, senior associate dean for research in the Dwight Look College of Engineering, deputy director of the Texas Engineering Experiment Station (TEES) and the director of the Texas Institute for Intelligent Materials and Structures. The inaugural recipient of the John and Bea Slattery Chair in Aerospace Engineering, Lagoudas joined the Texas A&M faculty in 1992. He earned a diploma in mechanical engineering from Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, and a Ph.D. in applied mathematics from Lehigh University in Bethlehem, Pa. Lagoudas pursued post-doctoral studies in theoretical and applied physics/mechanics at Cornell University and the Max Planck Institute in Germany. His research involves the design, characterization and modeling of multifunctional material systems at nano, micro and macro levels to bridge the various length scales and functionalities. His research team is one of the most recognized internationally in the area of modeling and characterization of shape memory alloys. He has co-authored approximately 400 scientific publications. He is a TEES fellow, a University Distinguished Professor, a Texas A&M University Faculty Fellow, a Fellow of ASME and the Institute of Physics and the Society of Engineering Science, and an Associate Fellow of AIAA. He is the recipient of the International Society for Optics and Photonics (SPIE) Smart Structure and Materials Lifetime Achievement Award and the ASME Adaptive Structures and Material Systems Prize.


 

Nidal Al-Masoud, Ph.D.

Nidal Al-Masoud
Nidal Al-Masoud (left) accepting the 2014 ASME Distinguished Engineer of the Year Award.

ASME member Nidal Al-Masoud, Ph.D., was recently presented the Society's 2014 Distinguished Engineer of the Year Award upon the recommendation of the Central Connecticut State University (CCSU) Department of Engineering and the ASME Hartford Section. The award presentation event was sponsored by Pratt & Whitney and Belcan Engineering Group and hosted by Aaron Danenberg, a CCSU mechanical engineering alumnus and the current chair of the ASME Hartford Section. The annual award acknowledges exemplary achievement and professionalism in the field of engineering. Al-Masoud has established a long record of dedicated service within the engineering department at Central Connecticut State University, including taking a leading role in the creation of CCSU's mechanical engineering program — the first baccalaureate engineering program in the Connecticut State Colleges and Universities system. Al-Masoud also remodeled and developed new engineering laboratories focusing on fluids, dynamics, and controls, and collaborated with fellow faculty members on a variety of publications. He established the CCSU ASME student chapter in 2004, where he continues to act as faculty advisor and served on the ASME Hartford Section's board of directors from 2006-2012. An active member of the section's scholarship committee, Al-Masoud remains the section's principal liaison with CCSU.


 

Cliff Lissenden, Ph.D., P.E.

Cliff Lissenden, Ph.D., P.E.
Cliff Lissenden, Ph.D., P.E.

ASME member Cliff Lissenden, Ph.D., P.E., professor of engineering science and mechanics at Pennsylvania State University, was recently named a Fellow of ASME. Lissenden's research focuses on the mechanics of materials and the assessment of structural integrity to help ensure safety, reduce life cycle costs, improve asset readiness and create a paradigm shift in design. ASME cited Lissenden for his new insights into the hardening behavior of high temperature alloys and composites; an algorithm implemented in NASA's micromechanical analysis of composites software; and solutions to the generation of higher harmonic guided wave modes in a hollow cylinder. He has been a Penn State faculty member since 1995 and holds a joint appointment in the acoustics graduate program. Lissenden founded the Ben Franklin Center of Excellence in Structural Health Monitoring at Penn State and served as its director for five years. He received his bachelor's degree in civil engineering from Virginia Tech, his master's degree in civil engineering from the University of Virginia and his doctorate in civil engineering/applied mechanics from the University of Virginia. Lissenden is a registered professional engineer in Florida.


 

Katia Bertoldi, Ph.D.

Katia Bertoldi
Katia Bertoldi, Ph.D.

ASME member Katia Bertoldi, Ph.D., associate professor in applied mechanics at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS), has been selected to receive ASME's 2014 Thomas J. R. Hughes Young Investigator Award. The award, established in 1998, recognizes special achievements in applied mechanics for researchers under the age of 40. The award, which includes a medal, a plaque, and an honorarium of $1,500, will be presented at the Applied Mechanics Division (AMD) Honors and Awards Banquet during the ASME International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition in Montreal, Quebec, from Nov. 14-20. The AMD Executive Committee selected Bertoldi on the basis of her significant contributions to the theory and simulation of the mechanics of soft materials and structures. Her research combines theoretical, computational, and experimental methods to gain deeper insight into the nonlinear behavior of materials and structures. In particular, she uses large deformation and instabilities to drastically change the properties of soft materials in response to external stimuli such as applied forces and electric fields. Bertoldi is also a faculty associate of the Materials Research Science and Engineering Center at Harvard, and a Kavli Scholar at the Kavli Institute for Bionano Science and Technology at Harvard SEAS. Prior to her appointment at Harvard in 2010, Bertoldi was an assistant professor at the University of Twente in the Netherlands. She earned a Ph.D. in mechanics of materials and structures from the University of Trento in Italy; an International Master's degree in structural engineering from Chalmers University of Technology in Goteborg, Sweden; and a laurea degree in civil engineering from the University of Trento. In 2012, she received the National Science Foundation's Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Award, a $400,000 prize to support her research into "Buckli Origami" —an investigation of buckling behaviors in soft materials.


 

Teik Lim, Ph.D.

Teik Lim
Teik Lim, Ph.D.

The University of Cincinnati (UC) has named ASME Fellow Teik Lim, Ph.D., P.E., as dean of its College of Engineering and Applied Science. Dr. Lim had been serving as interim dean since 2012. He became the permanent dean effective March 10. Lim's goals include increasing the size and diversity of the faculty, increasing enrollment of undergraduate students to 4,000 and graduate students to 1,000, and increasing the college's global reputation. Lim launched the Cincinnati/Chongquing Joint Cooperative Institute during his tenure as interim dean. Lim has served on the mechanical engineering faculty at the University of Cincinnati since 2002. Prior to his appointment as interim dean, Lim served as the college's associate dean for graduate studies and research, and director of the college's School of Dynamic Systems, which includes mechanical engineering and mechanical engineering technology. Lim is the founder of the UC Simulation Center, a collaborative effort between the university and Procter & Gamble. The center provides P&G cost-effective, high value virtual modeling and simulation capabilities that are applied to their products and manufacturing processes. He has conducted pioneering research related to three-dimensional gearing dynamics, active noise and vibration control, and vehicle structural dynamics. Lim became department head for mechanical, industrial and nuclear engineering in January 2005. He was named Herman Schneider Professor of Mechanical Engineering in 2009. He received his B.S. in mechanical engineering from Michigan Technological University in 1985, his M.S. in mechanical engineering from the University of Missouri–Rolla in 1986, and a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering in 1989 from the Ohio State University. Lim is a Fellow of both ASME and SAE International, and received the Thomas French Alumni Award from the Ohio State University in 2010.


 

Aditi Chattopadhyay, Ph.D.

<strong>Aditi Chattopadhyay</strong>
Aditi Chattopadhyay, Ph.D.

ASME Fellow Aditi Chattopadhyay, Ph.D., was one of four Arizona State University professors who were recently named Regents' Professors for their extraordinary scholarly contributions. Chattopadhyay is an Ira A. Fulton Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, School for Engineering of Matter, Transport and Energy, within the Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering, and the director of the Adaptive, Intelligent Materials and Systems Center at Arizona State. The four awardees were honored at an induction ceremony on Feb. 6. Chattopadhyay is an internationally renowned expert on composite materials, structural health monitoring, multidisciplinary design optimization and their application in a range of important problems central to the aerospace industry and a growing variety of applications in civil/structural industries. She has held a resident Research Scientist position at the NASA Langley Research Center and summer faculty positions at the NASA Ames Research Center. She received her undergraduate degree in aerospace engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur, India, and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in aerospace engineering from Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta. In addition to being an ASME Fellow, she is also a Fellow in the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics and the Georgia Institute of Technology Hall of Fame. Chattopadhyay has also received several NASA Tech Brief awards, which is among NASA's most prestigious honors.


 

Hosam Fathy, Ph.D.

<strong>Hosam Fathy</strong>
Hosam Fathy, Ph.D.

ASME member Hosam Fathy, Ph.D., assistant professor of mechanical engineering at Pennsylvania State University, has been awarded a National Science Foundation (NSF) Early Career Development (CAREER) Award. The NSF CAREER Award, which provides five years of funding for researchers, is designed to support junior faculty who have shown exceptional promise in teaching and research. Dr. Fathy received a $400,000 grant for "Identifiability Optimization in Electrochemical Battery Systems." His work seeks to develop new models and parameters for thermo-electrochemical lithium-ion batteries. This effort to improve battery diagnostics through identifiability optimization will ultimately lead to improved performance, efficiency, longevity and safety of advanced batteries used in everyday applications, such as medical devices, consumer electronics, hybrid vehicles, aircraft and spacecraft. Fathy has been a member of the Penn State faculty since 2010. His research focuses on control-oriented modeling of health degradation in advanced batteries, battery health-conscious optimal power management in sustainable energy systems and networked hardware-in-the-loop simulation of sustainable energy systems. He received his bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering from the American University in Cairo, Egypt, his master's degree in mechanical engineering from Kansas State University and his doctorate in mechanical engineering from the University of Michigan.


 

Jack Christiansen

Jack Christiansen
Jack Christiansen

ASME member Jack Christiansen, director of the Petroleum Technology Initiative in the University of Houston's College of Technology, has been named winner of ASME's Ross Kastor Educator's Award. The award recognizes dedication to improving engineering and science awareness for students and the enhancement of education for future industry leaders. Christiansen joined the university's staff after a 35-year career in the oil and gas industry. Christiansen worked as a geophysicist and geologist before entering management with Texaco and later, Chevron Corp. In 2007, Christiansen became founding director of the Petroleum Technology Initiative, which offers classes, field trips, professional events and other initiatives for students, as well as programs and specialty courses for industry. The institute's signature programs include roundtable discussions and networking events with industry professionals; Camp RED, hosted by Halliburton, a five-day Spring Break program of site visits for technology and engineering students to learn about the petroleum industry; and a three-day program hosted by Dril-Quip, which designs and manufactures subsea, surface and offshore equipment. The institute also offers an intensive international petroleum executive training program.


 

Robert McMeeking, Ph.D.

Robert McMeeking, Ph.D.
Robert McMeeking, Ph.D.

ASME Fellow Robert McMeeking, Ph.D., professor of engineering at the University of California, Santa Barbara, has been awarded the 2014 William Prager Medal from the Society of Engineering Science. The award recognizes outstanding research contributions in either theoretical or experimental solid mechanics, or both fields. McMeeking was cited "for contributions underpinning finite deformation computational mechanics and the constitutive characterization of advanced structural and functional materials, including fracture and deformation of ceramics, composite materials, ferroelectrics, and the mechanics of adhesion and cells." He will receive his medal at the SES 51st Annual Technical Meeting in October at Purdue University. The Tony Evans Professor of Structural Materials and a professor of mechanical engineering, McMeeking has spent almost four decades in his profession, researching and teaching at Stanford University and at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign before joining the UCSB faculty in 1985. He was chair of the university's department of mechanical and environmental engineering from 1992 to 1995, and again from 1999 to 2003. In addition to his faculty positions at UCSB, he also holds or has held other academic appointments, including visiting fellow and visiting professor at Cambridge University, visiting scholar at Pembroke College, and Sixth Century Professor of Engineering Materials at Aberdeen University in Scotland. An expert in solid mechanics, materials and structures, McMeeking has conducted research ranging from mechanics of materials to multifunctional materials and structures to thermal barrier coatings, blast- and fragment-resistant structures, to biomechanics and cell mechanics. He has published more than 200 papers and served as editor-in-chief for the ASME Journal of Applied Mechanics from 2002 to 2012. A Fellow of the American Academy of Mechanics, McMeeking was elected to the U.S. National Academy of Engineering in 2005 and the United Kingdom Royal Academy of Engineering in 2012.


 

Aaron L. Brundage, Ph.D.

Aaron L. Brundage, Ph.D.
Aaron L. Brundage, Ph.D.

ASME member Aaron L. Brundage, Ph.D., has been named as a 2013 Black Engineer of the Year (BEYA) Minority in Research Science Emerald Honoree in the category of Most Promising Scientist – Government. BEYA awards recognize the nation's best and brightest engineers, scientists and technology experts. They are a program of the national Career Communications Group, an advocate for corporate diversity, and part of its STEM achievement program. Dr. Brundage will receive his award at the 28th BEYA conference Feb. 6 in Washington, D.C. Brundage works in modeling and simulation of energetic materials, penetration mechanics, thermodynamics, and combustion and shock physics. He joined Sandia as an intern in 2002 while earning his doctorate in mechanical engineering at Purdue University. He also has bachelor's and master's degrees in mechanical engineering from Pennsylvania State University. Brundage serves on the board of directors of Big Brothers Big Sisters of Central New Mexico. In 2011, he and his wife founded a nonprofit, Tools for Learning Outreach Services, which provides workshops in partnership with schools and community programs. Their STEM education programs, intended to reach children who are underserved, at-risk or underrepresented in STEM disciplines, provide hands-on activities and opportunities for learning through play. Brundage also brought STEM to underrepresented youth in the sixth through 12th grades by volunteering for eight summers as an instructor for HMTech, Sandia's summer science and engineering program, and by teaching ACT courses at the University of New Mexico. Brundage is a former chair of the Society's New Mexico Section.


 

Delfo Bianchini, P.E.

Delfo Bianchini, P.E.
Delfo Bianchini, P.E.

ASME member Delfo Bianchini, P.E., executive vice president and assistant head of the Nuclear Power Technologies Group at Sargent & Lundy, was recently named as an ASME Fellow. Bianchini, who has been with Sargent & Lundy for 35 years and is a widely respected power industry executive, is responsible for the overall management of all new nuclear generation and nuclear services work performed by the company. He is responsible for coordinating business development activities, project management, risk management, resource planning and hiring, training, and client relations. He ensures that all work is performed in accordance with the Sargent & Lundy Quality Assurance Program. Bianchini has experience in the mechanical design, engineering, and analysis of major nuclear and fossil-fueled steam-electric generating stations. Bianchini has managed large projects and teams of engineers performing extensive scopes of nuclear plant work, and has managed several very large recovery and restart efforts of nuclear power generating units, including Independent Safety Inspection and Appendix R reconstitution efforts. A member of ASME since 1987, Bianchini received his bachelor's degree in nuclear engineering from Northwestern University in 1979 and an M.B.A. from the University of Chicago in 1989.


 

Ajay K. Agrawal, Ph.D., P.E.

Ajay K. Agrawal, Ph.D., P.E.
Ajay K. Agrawal, Ph.D., P.E.

ASME Fellow Ajay K. Agrawal, Ph.D., P.E., professor and Robert F. Barfield Endowed Chair in Mechanical Engineering at the University of Alabama, received the university's 2013 Blackmon-Moody Outstanding Professor Award on Nov. 15. The award recognizes singular, exceptional or timely work in the form of research, a product, a program, or published material. Dr. Agrawal, whose research expertise include combustion and fluid flow, invented the "noise sponge" concept that uses strong, porous structures to reduce noise generated from gas flow in jet engines, power generating gas turbines and industrial burners without compromising the combustion process. Agrawal has been the recipient of several research grants and is one of the world's most published authors on the topic of rainbow schlieren deflectometry, an optical flow diagnostics technique used to quantitatively measure properties of fluid flows. Agrawal has also done fundamental and applied research on combustion and fluid flows for NASA, the Department of Defense and the Department of Energy. At the University of Alabama, Agrawal has worked to increase the amount of doctoral students in mechanical engineering with the help of two U.S. Department of Education funded awards. In addition, he has so far supervised 14 doctorate and 26 masters' graduates and guided research for nearly 50 undergraduate students. Agrawal founded the Institute for Sustainable Energy (ISE) at UA that focuses on domestically-produced energy sources. He earned his bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology in Roorkee in 1980, his master's degree at the Indian Institute of Technology in Kanpur, India, in 1983, and his doctorate from the University of Miami in 1988. He has been an ASME member since 1987.


 

Richard C. Sutherlin

Richard C. Sutherlin
Richard C. Sutherlin

ASME member Richard C. Sutherlin, manager of technical services at ATI Wah Chang in Albany, Ore., has received the 2013 H.R. "Russ" Ogden Award from ASTM International. The annual award, presented by ASTM Committee B10 on Reactive and Refractory Metals and Alloys, honors outstanding accomplishments in the science and technology of reactive and refractory metals and alloys. The fifth ATI Wah Chang employee to receive this ASTM award, Sutherlin was recognized for his significant contributions to the development of applications for reactive and refractory metals to be used in corrosive environments, with specific focus on zirconium, titanium and niobium. Sutherlin has been with Wah Chang since 1977, and served in a variety of positions including manager of outside fabrication, business unit manager, and manager of materials engineering. In his current role, which he assumed in 2000, he provides technical support to users in the areas of materials selection for corrosive environments, failure analysis, welding, and applications engineering. A graduate of the Montana College of Mineral Science and Technology of the University of Montana, where he received a bachelor's degree in metallurgical engineering, Sutherlin is a registered professional engineer in the state of Oregon. An ASME member since 2002, Sutherlin is also a member of the American Welding Society and NACE International, and has served as the technical chair for the ATI Corrosion Solutions Conference since its launch in 1997.


 

James M. Gibert, Ph.D.

James M. Gibert, Ph.D.
James M. Gibert

ASME member James M. Gibert, Ph.D., has been appointed assistant professor of mechanical and aeronautical engineering at Clarkson University in Potsdam, N.Y. Before joining Clarkson, Dr. Gibert conducted post-doctoral research at Clemson in the department of mechanical engineering. His focus included the modeling the nonlinear dynamics present ultrasonic consolidation process, developing performance metrics for dual mass vibrational energy harvesters, developing lumped parameter dynamic models of packaging systems, and analytical models for the vibrations and rolling resistance of a non-pneumatic tire developed by Michelin Inc. While at Clemson, he was a visiting professor in the department of civil engineering. He was an advisor to graduate as well as undergraduate students, and taught civil engineering courses. He also served on the graduate student advisory board and in 2010 was a research faculty mentor with the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Louis Stokes-South Carolina Alliance for Minority Participation program. He served as consultant to MOOG, CSA and worked in partnership with the Air Force Research Lab in Albuquerque, N.M., on structural health monitoring of bolted interfaces in satellites and space situational awareness. Gibert received his bachelor of science in mechanical engineering, graduating cum laude from Clemson University. He also received his master of science and his Ph.D., both in mechanical engineering, from Clemson University. He has received a number of awards and honors, including the Highly Commended 2011 Emerald Engineering Outstanding Doctoral Award; the Outstanding Paper Emerald Award for Excellence 2011; the South East Alliance for Graduate Education and the Professoriate Fellow NSF graduate fellowship from 2004-2008; and the NSF/ASME Student Design Essay Award in 2008.


 

Timothy W. Simpson, Ph.D.

Timothy W. Simpson, Ph.D.
Timothy W. Simpson, Ph.D.

ASME Fellow Timothy W. Simpson, Ph.D., professor of industrial engineering and mechanical engineering at Penn State, has been selected as the winner of ASME's 2014 Ben C. Sparks Medal. Established in 1990, the Sparks Medal recognizes service to engineering education through "innovative, authentic, practice-based engineering design/build experiences to undergraduate students." Dr. Simpson was honored for his many contributions to engineering education while he served as director of the Bernard M. Gordon Learning Factory from 2007 to 2012. The Learning Factory combines real-world experience with classroom education by providing students with hands-on experiences through industry-sponsored and client-based capstone design projects. Simpson will be recognized at the 2014 ASME International Mechanical Engineering Education Leadership Summit in March in San Juan, Puerto Rico. A member of the Penn State faculty since 1998, Simpson serves as co-director of the Engineering Design and Optimization Group Laboratory and co-director of the Center for Innovative Materials Process through Direct Digital Deposition. His research focuses on engineering design and design methodologies. Simpson's awards include the National Science Foundation's Faculty Early Career Development Award, the American Society of Engineering Educators' Fred Merryfield Design Award and SAE International's Ralph R. Teetor Educational Award. He is an associate fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics. Simpson received his bachelor's in mechanical engineering from Cornell University and his master's and doctoral degrees in mechanical engineering from Georgia Tech.


Earlier this year, ASME Fellows Alexander H. Slocum and Gloria J. Wiens began one-year terms as ASME Foundation Swanson Fellows through the Society's Federal Government Fellowship Program. The ASME Foundation Swanson Fellowship was established in 2010 in recognition of Dr. John A. Swanson, an internationally recognized authority and innovator in the application of finite element analysis to engineering. The Swanson Fellowship is designed to provide a unique opportunity for experienced engineers to serve as Federal Fellows in agencies of the U.S. Government including the Executive Office of the President in the White House, where they can apply their broad, multidisciplinary background toward solutions to technical issues. Swanson Fellows engage with professionals in the public policy arena to make practical contributions on the most effective use of engineering in federal decision making while strengthening their understanding of the intricacies of policy-making.

 

Alexander Slocum, Ph.D.

Alexander Slocum, Ph.D.
Alexander Slocum, Ph.D.

Alexander Slocum, Ph.D., accepted an assignment to serve in the Office of Science and Technology Policy as the Assistant Director for Advanced Manufacturing. Dr. Slocum is the Pappalardo Professor of Mechanical Engineering and a MacVicar Faculty Fellow at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he teaches and conducts research in the area of precision machine design. Slocum's research focuses on making mechanical devices achieve higher levels of performance for less cost by using deterministic design practices founded in fundamental principles of precision engineering catalyzed by appropriate analysis and experimentation. In addition to working with industry to create new machines, Slocum also works in his lab to create new fundamental machine elements and design analysis tools to enable industry to adopt and scale them for use in their own products. Slocum is an ASME Fellow and has received numerous awards during his 30-year career including the ASME Leonardo da Vinci Award in 2004 and the ASME Machine Design Award in 2008. He is a member of the Machine Design Award Committee and a former member of the Ruth & Joel Spira Outstanding Design Educator Award Committee. He also served as an associate editor for the ASME Journal of Mechanical Design.

 

Gloria Wiens, Ph.D.

Gloria Wiens, Ph.D.
Gloria Wiens, Ph.D.

Gloria Wiens, Ph.D., is serving as a Swanson Fellow in the office of the Assistant Director for Research Partnerships in the Advanced Manufacturing National Program Office of the National Institute of Standards and Technology. Dr. Wiens is an associate professor and the director of the Space, Automation, and Manufacturing Mechanisms (SAMM) Laboratory at the University of Florida in Gainesville. Her research interests include robotics; spatial mechanisms; system dynamics and controls with applications in space; reconfigurable micro/small satellite deployable systems; automation; MEMS/biomedical devices; and micro/mesoscale manipulation and manufacturing. Her teaching focuses on dynamics and controls of robotic systems; kinematics and dynamics of machinery; and vibrations and controls. Wiens has been an active ASME volunteer, serving in a number of Society positions including chair of the ASME Honors and Awards Committee, the Manufacturing Engineering Division (MED) Executive Committee, the ASME MED Nano/Micro/Meso Technical Committee, the Micro/Nano-Scale Systems (MNS) Committee, and the Student Design Competition Committee. She also served as associate editor of the ASME Journal on Manufacturing Science and Engineering. Wiens received the ASME Dedicated Service Award in 2000.


 

Maurizio Porfiri, Ph.D.

Maurizio Porfiri, Ph.D.
Maurizio Porfiri, Ph.D.

ASME member Maurizio Porfiri, Ph.D., an associate professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering at the Polytechnic Institute of New York University (NYU-Poly), has been named the ASME Dynamic Systems and Controls Division 2013 Outstanding Young Investigator Award for his contributions to biomimetic underwater robotics and collective dynamics of networked dynamical systems. Dr. Porfiri's most widely known research, which centers on biomimetic robotic fish to aid the understanding of animal collective behavior, may someday result in robots that could lead live fish away from dangerous areas. Beyond his fundamental contribution to this emerging domain of ethorobotics, Porfiri has made substantial contributions to the field of network theory, dynamical systems and multiphysics modeling of complex systems. Earlier this year, ASME awarded Porfiri its Gary Anderson Early Achievement Award for his contributions to the field of smart structures and materials. In 2010, Popular Science included him in its "Brilliant 10" list — an elite group of scientists under the age of 40 whose work stands to dramatically impact their fields. The editors of the magazine named him the "Water Wizard" for his work on the biologically inspired robots that might influence animal behavior in nature. Porfiri previously received a prestigious National Science Foundation CAREER award, in 2008. The CAREER awards advance the research of promising young scientists and engineers. He received the Young Alumnus Award from the College of Engineering of Virginia Polytechnic Institute, where he earned a doctorate in engineering mechanics. He also holds a doctorate in theoretical and applied mechanics from Sapienza University of Rome.


 

Kiran Solanki, Ph.D.

Kiran Solanki, Ph.D.
Kiran Solanki, Ph.D.

ASME member Kiran Solanki, Ph.D., an assistant professor of engineering at Arizona State University, was recently announced as the winner of the ASME Materials Division's Orr Early Career Award. Established in 2004, the award recognizes early career research excellence in the areas of experimental, computational or theoretical fatigue, fracture or creep. Dr. Solanki's research has earned him several awards in recent years, as well as support from the Office of Naval Research, the Department of Defense and the Department of Energy. A member of the faculty of Arizona State's School for Engineering of Matter, Transport and Energy, Solanki's research expertise spans several areas, including computational fatigue and fracture, constitutive modeling for metallic alloys and others areas at the interface of solid mechanics and material science. Solanki has authored or co-authored 40 research journal articles, four book chapters and 35 conference proceedings reports during his time at ASU and his previous faculty position at Mississippi State University. He is also currently leading a project sponsored by the Office of Naval Research focusing on the environmental impacts of naval materials. His goal is to postulate principles that can aid software development to explore the predictability of fatigue and cracking growth in naval materials. In addition to the Orr Early Career Award, Solanki is also the winner of the 2013 Young Leader Professional Development Award from TMS, the Minerals, Metals and Materials Society, which bestows the honor on young faculty members to help support their promising research.


 

Bharat Bhushan, Ph.D., P.E.

Bharat Bhushan, Ph.D., P.E.
Bharat Bhushan, Ph.D., P.E.

Last month, ASME Fellow Bharat Bhushan, Ph.D., P.E., began his new yearlong role as an ASME Congressional Fellow through the Society's Federal Government Fellowship Program. The program enables selected ASME members to devote a year of working in government, providing technical advice to policymakers in the Congress and other federal agencies. Dr. Bhushan accepted an assignment to serve on the U.S. House Committee on Science, Space and Technology, Subcommittee on Research and Technology. His duties, while on leave from Ohio State University where he is the Ohio Eminent Scholar and Howard D. Winbigler Professor and director of the Nanoprobe Laboratory for Bio- and Nanotechnology and Biomimetics, will include working on science policy and arranging hearings for the subcommittee. As a faculty member of the department of mechanical and aerospace engineering, he believes his new role as a public policy adviser aligns with his engineering school's interest in public policy discussion and outreach. "As the world of education and research funding continues to change, it's vital that our critical thinking skills be utilized to help our politicians better understand the technology and innovations that are emerging from STEM-related fields," he said. Bhushan has been an active ASME volunteer during his 40 years of membership, serving on the Committee on Honors, the Nominating Committee, the Systems and Design Technical Group, and as founder and chair of the ASME Information Storage and Processing Systems Division, among other Society positions.


 

Mahantesh S. Hiremath, Ph.D., P.E.

Mahantesh S. Hiremath, Ph.D., P.E.
Mahantesh S. Hiremath, Ph.D., P.E.

ASME Fellow Mahantesh S. Hiremath, Ph.D., P.E., an engineer at Space Systems Loral (SSL), the leading provider of communications satellites and space systems, also began a one-year term as an ASME Congressional Fellow in September. Dr. Hiremath will take a leave of absence from Palo Alto, Calif.-based SSL to serve his fellowship with the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Science, Space and Technology in Washington, D.C., where he will contribute his expertise and perspective on technical initiatives involving energy, environment and space. As deployment subsystems manager at SSL, Hiremath is involved in mechanical design, systems engineering, risk management, and other technical duties attending six major satellite programs of the company. He has more than 25 years of experience in areas ranging from structural analysis to technical management, and held important engineering positions with Northrup Grumman, Stellar Solutions, ARES Corp., and Serata Geomechanics, among other industrial firms. A Ph.D. graduate of Ohio State University, Hiremath is a highly regarded technical expert in structural dynamics, systems engineering and program management. Hiremath is a registered professional civil engineer in California.

ASME was the first engineering society to establish a Federal Government Fellowship Program, which began in 1973.


 

Eckart Meiburg, Ph.D.

Eckart Meiburg, Ph.D.
Eckart Meiburg, Ph.D.

Eckart Meiburg, Ph.D., a professor in the department of mechanical engineering at the University of California, Santa Barbara, was recently named as an ASME Fellow. The ASME Fellow grade of membership is conferred upon a member with at least 10 years of active engineering practice and who has made significant contributions to the profession. Dr. Meiburg's research interests lie in the general area of fluid dynamics and transport phenomena. He has published in many refereed journals including Physics of Fluids, the Journal of Turbulence, and the Journal of Fluid Mechanics. Meiburg, a 1990 recipient of the Presidential Young Investigator Award, received Outstanding Teaching Awards from the University of Southern California School of Engineering in 1997 and 1998. A fellow of the American Physical Society, Meiburg is also the recipient of the 2005 Alexander von Humboldt Foundation Senior Research Award, the 2008 Gledden Fellowship from the University of Western Australia, and First Prize from the Scottish Offshore Achievement Awards. Meiburg received his Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from the University of Karlsruhe in 1985. He is a member of the American Geophysical Union and the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.


 

Sam Y. Zamrik, Ph.D.

Sam Y. Zamrik, Ph.D.
ASME Past President Sam Y. Zamrik (left) and his wife, Myrna (right), were joined by their grandson, ASME student member Ryan Lester, for the centennial celebration at the University of Texas at Austin.

Last month, ASME Past President Sam Y. Zamrik, Ph.D., attended the centennial celebration of the mechanical engineering department of the University of Texas at Austin. Nearly 200 faculty, students, alumni and friends of the department attended the 100th anniversary celebration, which included a tailgate party, an anniversary dinner, and a special lighting of the famed University of Texas Tower in honor of the centennial. After the dinner, ME Department Chair Dr. Jayathi Murthy invited Dr. Zamrik, one of the university's Distinguished Alumni, to help blow out the candles on the centennial celebration cake, which was a replica of the Centennial Tower. Zamrik, an ASME Honorary Member and Fellow, attended the event with his wife, Myrna, and grandson Ryan Lester, who is a freshman in mechanical engineering at the University of Texas and a member of the school's ASME student section.


 

Lt. Col. Donald W. Rhymer, Ph.D

Lt. Col. Donald W. Rhymer, Ph.D
Lt. Col. Donald W. Rhymer, Ph.D

Engineering honor society Tau Beta Pi has named ASME member Lt. Col. Donald W. Rhymer, Ph.D., as its eighth McDonald Mentor. The award celebrates excellence in mentoring and advising among Tau Beta Pi educators and engineers who consistently support the personal and professional development of their students and colleagues. Dr. Rhymer is professor and department head of engineering mechanics at the United States Air Force Academy (USAFA) in Colorado. He is the 2013 Tau Beta Pi-McDonald Mentor, and will be honored Nov. 1 at the association's 108th annual convention in Ames, Iowa. Established in 2005, the McDonald Mentor Award recognizes engineering educators or professionals in industry, government, or service organizations who have shown true concern for the individual, supporting an environment for developing talents, and who have earned respect and recognition for their contributions to their field and to the greater community. A devoted advisor, Dr. Rhymer was selected by Tau Beta Pi for going beyond the call in developing and mentoring engineering students. Rhymer received his B.S. in engineering mechanics from the USAFA and a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology. He has been an instructor in the engineering mechanics department at USAFA for more than six years. In 2010, he became the deputy for the mechanical engineering curriculum. Rhymer advised 24 cadets during the recent academic year, including a Rhodes Scholar. In addition, he leads a council of cadets majoring in mechanical engineering to foster a direct means of student assessment and feedback. His devotion to his profession was recently recognized when the USAFA named him Outstanding Academy Educator and Department of Engineering Mechanics Instructor of the Year for the department of engineering Mechanics. This year, the Colorado Zeta Chapter of Tau Beta Pi also selected him as Instructor of the Year.


 

Eui-Hyeok Yang, Ph.D.

Eui-Hyeok Yang, Ph.D.
Eui-Hyeok Yang, Ph.D.

ASME member Eui-Hyeok Yang, Ph.D., associate professor of mechanical engineering and director of the Multi-User Micro Device Laboratory at Stevens Institute of Technology in Hoboken, N.J., is the new chair of ASME's Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) Division. In his new role, he will lead the division in efforts to foster collaboration and maintain a high level of creativity in the field; generate standards and guidelines for MEMS processes and technologies; disseminate information about ongoing developments in MEMS; provide a focal point for mechanical engineers entering and practicing in the field; and train multi-disciplinary MEMS researchers to encourage the growth of the field. In his role as division chair, Dr. Yang will lead the division in collaborative efforts associated with the International Technical Conference and Exhibition on Packaging and Integration of Electronic and Photonic Microsystems (InterPACK). As the flagship conference of the ASME Electronic and Photonic Packaging Division, InterPACK is the premier international forum for exchange of state-of-the-art knowledge in research, development, manufacturing, and applications of electronic packaging, MEMS, and nanoelectromechanical systems. Yang has had a long and productive involvement with ASME and the MEMS Division. As a representative organization for an inherently multi-disciplinary field, the MEMS division has coordinated closely with other ASME divisions, including the Dynamic Systems and Controls, Heat Transfer, Fluids Engineering, Applied Mechanics, Bioengineering, Design Engineering, Electronic and Photonic Packaging, and Manufacturing Engineering Divisions, for the ASME International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exhibition. Yang has been involved in organizing tracks, topics and sessions in support of the Congress, and served as chair for the Micro and Nano Systems Track at the 2009, 2010 and 2011 Congresses.


Three faculty members from Massachusetts Institute of Technology's department of mechanical engineering — Steven Dubowsky, Dan Frey and Maria Yang — were recognized with awards at the ASME 2013 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences (IDETC) last month in Portland. Ore.

 

Professor Steven Dubowsky, Ph.D., P.E.

RProfessor Steven Dubowsky, Ph.D., P.E.
Professor Steven Dubowsky, Ph.D., P.E.

Professor Steven Dubowsky, Ph.D., P.E., director of MIT's Field and Space Robotics Laboratory, received the Mechanism and Robotics Award in recognition of his cumulative contribution to the field of the dynamic behavior of nonlinear machines, mechanisms and robotic systems. Dr. Dubowsky, who is an ASME Fellow, has been a professor of engineering and applied science at the University of California, Los Angeles, a visiting professor at Cambridge University in England, and a visiting professor at the California Institute of Technology. Dubowsky's research has included the development of modeling techniques for manipulator flexibility and the development of optimal and self-learning adaptive control procedures for rigid and flexible robotic manipulators. He is a registered Professional Engineer in the State of California and has served as an advisor to the National Science Foundation, the National Academy of Science/Engineering, the Department of Energy, and the U.S. Army.


 

Dan Frey, Ph.D.

Dan Frey, Ph.D.
Dan Frey, Ph.D.

Professor and ASME Fellow Dan Frey, Ph.D., co-director of the Singapore-MIT International Design Center, received the Best Paper Award at the International Conference on Advanced Vehicle Technologies. The paper, titled "Conventional and Novel Methods for Estimating an Electric Vehicle's 'Distance to Empty,'" was led by recent graduate Lennon Rodgers, Ph.D., in conjunction with Dr. Frey and Professor Erik Wilhelm, a faculty member at the Singapore University of Technology and Design. The research discussed in Frey's award-winning paper investigated improved on-board predictions of the "distance to empty." To assuage consumer fears that EVs will run out of energy before they reach a refueling station, Frey's team proposes a prediction algorithm based on multivariate regression over variables such as ambient temperature, road conditions, and current traffic on the selected route to alert drivers to an accurate refueling timeframe. The resulting predictions have a much lower chance of error than those algorithms currently used in electric vehicles.


 

Maria Yang, Ph.D.

Maria Yang, Ph.D.,
Maria Yang, Ph.D.

Associate Professor Maria Yang, Ph.D., an ASME member, received the Best Paper Award at the Design Theory and Methodology Conference for the paper titled "The Influence of Timing in Exploratory Prototyping and Other Activities in Design Projects." Dr. Yang and her research group explore the question of whether there is a relationship between the quality of a design and when/how long teams engage in key design activities, such as brainstorming, evaluating ideas, and fabricating prototypes of those ideas. The paper establishes correlations between several tasks, but specifically shows that the building of physical prototypes early on in the process seems to play a crucial role in future design success.


 

Richard I. “Dick” Pawliger

Richard I. “Dick” Pawliger
ASME Past President Paul Torpey presented the Dedicated Service Award to Dick Pawliger at the 2013 Annual Meeting in Indianapolis.

ASME Fellow Richard I. "Dick" Pawliger recently received the ASME Dedicated Service Award. Established in 1983, the award honors unusual dedicated voluntary service to the Society marked by outstanding performance, demonstrated effective leadership, prolonged and committed service, devotion, enthusiasm and faithfulness. The award is presented to ASME members who have served the Society for at least 10 years. Pawliger, who retired from American Electric Power in 1999 after 40 years at the company, is the chair of the Society's History and Heritage Committee. He has been chair of the committee since 2009. Pawliger had previously served as a trustee for the ASME Foundation from 1998-2004, and as a member of the History and Heritage Affinity Group from 2008-2011. He has been a member of ASME for 58 years.


 

William P. "Bill" Bahnfleth, P.E.

William P. "Bill" Bahnfleth, P.E.
William P. "Bill" Bahnfleth, P.E.

ASME Fellow William P. "Bill" Bahnfleth, P.E., professor of architectural engineering at Penn State University, was recently named president of ASHRAE. Formerly the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers, ASHRAE is an international building science and technology society with more than 54,000 members around the world. Bahnfleth, who serves as director of Penn State's Indoor Environment Center, is also a fellow of ASHRAE. As president, he chairs the association's board of directors and executive committee. His father, Donald R. Bahnfleth, is an ASHRAE fellow, life member and former president, marking the first father/son presidency in the organization's history. Bahnfleth's ASHRAE service includes advising the organization's Penn State student branch and performing as an ASHRAE Distinguished Lecturer. He has chaired ASHRAE's Technology Council, Members Council, Technical Activities Committee and Technical Committee 6.9 Thermal Storage. He has been a member of ASME for 30 years.


 

Cristina Amon, Sc.D., and Javad Mostaghimi, Ph.D., P.E., of the University of Toronto were presented the 75th Anniversary Medal of the ASME Heat Transfer Division. Amon and Mostaghimi received the awards, which recognize outstanding contributions to the heat-transfer community, on July 15 during the 2013 Summer Heat Transfer Conference in Minneapolis, Minn.

 

Cristina Amon, Sc.D.

Cristina Amon, Sc.D.
Cristina Amon, Sc.D.

Amon, an ASME Fellow, has been the dean of the university's Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering and alumni professor of bioengineering in mechanical and industrial engineering since 2006. She is regarded as a pioneer in the development of computational fluid dynamics for formulating and solving thermal design problems subject to multidisciplinary competing constraints. Her research at the University of Toronto focuses on nanoscale thermal transport in semiconductors, energy systems and bioengineered devices. She has been inducted into four academies: the Canadian Academy of Engineering, the Spanish Royal Academy, the Royal Society of Canada and the U.S. National Academy of Engineering. She has been elected fellow or honorary member in each of the professional societies in her field and has contributed 350 refereed articles in education and research literature. A member of ASME for 25 years, Amon is a member of the Society's Committee on Honors and the K-16 Heat Transfer in Electronic Equipment Committee.

 

Javad Mostaghimi, Ph.D., P.E.

Javad Mostaghimi, Ph.D., P.E.
Javad Mostaghimi, Ph.D., P.E.

Mostaghimi, also an ASME Fellow, is a professor and the founding director of the Centre for Advanced Coating Technologies (CACT), one of the world's leading research centers in the area of thermal spray technology. Results of the research conducted at the Centre are widely used in the aerospace, automotive, power generation and resource extraction industries. Mostaghimi holds four patents, has published 148 refereed journal articles and has been cited more than 2,600 times. In addition to being an ASME Fellow, he is a also a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the Canadian Society for Mechanical Engineering (CSME), the Canadian Academy of Engineering, the Engineering Institute of Canada and the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry.


Amon and Mostaghimi have both previously received honors from ASME. Amon was a recipient of the ASME Gustus Larson Memorial Award in 2000, while both professors were honored with the ASME Heat Transfer Memorial Award in 2009 and 2012, respectively.

 

Gang Chen, Ph.D., P.E.,

Gang Chen, Ph.D., P.E.,
Gang Chen, Ph.D., P.E.,

ASME Fellow Gang Chen, Ph.D., P.E., the Carl Richard Soderberg Professor of Power Engineering, was named head of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's department of mechanical engineering effective July 23. The announcement was made earlier this month by Ian Waitz, dean of the school of engineering, who said, "Professor Chen's leadership, vision, dedication and strong sense of community will keep the department on its path of excellence and help it flourish in the days ahead." A member of the MIT faculty since 2001, Chen succeeds Mary Boyce, who had served as department head since 2009 and who is now dean of engineering and applied science at Columbia University. As the director of MIT's Pappalardo Micro and Nano Engineering Laboratory, Chen is internationally recognized for his contributions to nanoscale transport and energy-conversion phenomena. His work in nanoscale heat-conduction physics has led to significant advances in thermoelectric materials and in their application to converting solar energy and waste heat into electricity. Chen has served on the editorial and advisory boards of nine journals; as advisory board chair of the ASME Nanotechnology Institute; and has co-founded two companies, including GMZ Energy Inc., a maker of thermoelectric materials. He has also led several large research programs, including the first U.S. Department of Defense Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative on thermoelectric materials. Currently, he directs the Solid-State Solar-Thermal Energy Conversion Center (S3TEC), which is funded by the U.S. Department of Energy. A recipient of the ASME Heat Transfer Memorial Award in 2008, Chen has received a number of honors during his career, including R&D magazine's 100 Award, which recognizes top technology products; and the Capers and Marion McDonald Award for Excellence in Mentoring and Advising. In addition to being an ASME Fellow, Chen is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, the American Physical Society and the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

 

Laura Hitchcock

Laura Hitchcock
Laura Hitchcock

ASME member and active ASME Standards and Certification volunteer Laura Hitchcock has been selected to receive the 2013 George S. Wham Leadership Medal from the American National Standards Institute (ANSI). This award recognizes an individual who has made outstanding contributions to the voluntary standardization community and provided long-term direction and visionary qualities in support of the ANSI Federation. Hitchcock is the corporate project manager for External Standards Management, Strategy and Policy for The Boeing Company, where she serves as the company's enterprise-wide focal for issues regarding government, industry and international standards activities and has responsibility for external standards policy and strategy for the company. Hitchcock has been working with standards for more than 35 years, and was recently elected as ASME's incoming senior vice president for Standards and Certification. In addition to serving on the Council on Standards and Certification and the Council's Board on Hearing and Appeals, Hitchcock serves on a number of other standards-related governing bodies. She chairs the Strategic Standardization Forum for Aerospace, is a member of the ANSI Board of Directors, a member of SAE International's Technical Standards Board and chair of SAE's Aerospace Council, among other standards-related activities. She is a past member of the IEEE Standards Association's Board of Governors, SAE International's Board of Directors, and of ASTM's Board of Directors, and was the primary author of the Aerospace Industries Association's report on the Future of Aerospace Standardization.

 

Avram Bar-Cohen, Ph.D.,

Avram Bar-Cohen, Ph.D.,
Avram Bar-Cohen, Ph.D.,

Avram Bar-Cohen, Ph.D., a Distinguished University Professor of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Maryland's A. James Clark School of Engineering, was awarded the 75th Anniversary Medal of ASME's Heat Transfer Division during the 2013 Summer Heat Transfer Conference, which was held July 14-19 in Minneapolis. Bar-Cohen, an Honorary Member and Fellow of ASME, was selected for the he award in honor of his service to the heat transfer community and contributions to the heat transfer field. He has played a pivotal role in defining and guiding the emergence of thermal packaging as a critical engineering domain and is the leading advocate for the embedded microfluidic thermal packaging paradigm. His contributions have facilitated the development of high reliability consumer electronics, high performance computing platforms, and advanced phased array microwave communication and radar systems. In addition to receiving the medal at the 75th Anniversary Awards Ceremony, Bar-Cohen was recognized as a V.I.P. guest at the conference and was granted access all of the conference's technical sessions, workshops and special events. Bar-Cohen is currently serving as a program manager in the Microsystems Technology Office of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), with responsibility for the ICECool Program, while on leave from the Clark School's Department of Mechanical Engineering. A member of ASME for more than 40 years, Bar-Cohen has held a variety of ASME offices, including chair of the ASME Honors and Awards Committee, chair of the Board on Research and Technology Development, and member of the Mechanical Engineering Department Heads Committee. He is currently the chair of the Allan Kraus Thermal Management Medal Committee and a member of the K-16 Heat Transfer in Electronic Equipment Committee.

 

Gail H. Marcus, Sc.D.,

Gail H. Marcus, Sc.D.,
Gail H. Marcus, Sc.D.,

Gail H. Marcus, Sc.D., has been selected as the recipient of the 2013 Engineer-Historian Award of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) for her book, Nuclear Firsts: Milestones on the Road to Nuclear Power Development. The Engineer-Historian Award, established in 1990 by ASME's Committee on History and Heritage, recognizes outstanding published works by an engineer dealing with the history of mechanical engineering. The award is intended to encourage the active interest by mechanical engineers in the history of their profession. Dr. Marcus will be presented the award, which consists of a certificate and a $1,000 honorarium, during a ceremony taking place this November at ASME's International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition this November in San Diego. Marcus, the first woman to earn a doctorate in nuclear engineering in the United States, is an independent consultant on nuclear power technology and policy. She previously worked as deputy director-general of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Nuclear Energy Agency in Paris; principal deputy director of the DOE Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology; in various positions at the Nuclear Regulatory Commission; and as assistant chief of the Science Policy Research Division at the Congressional Research Service. Marcus has served as president of the American Nuclear Society and as chair of the Engineering Section of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. She also served on the National Research Council Committee on the Future Needs of Nuclear Engineering Education. Marcus holds bachelor's and master's degrees in physics, and a Sc.D. in nuclear engineering from MIT. For more information about this award and a list of its past recipients, visit www.asme.org/about-asme/get-involved/honors-awards/unit-awards/engineer-historian-award.

 

Portonovo Ayyaswamy

Portonovo Ayyaswamy
Portonovo Ayyaswamy

Portonovo Ayyaswamy the Asa Whitney Professor of Dynamical Engineering in the department of mechanical engineering and applied mechanics at the University of Pennsylvania, has been selected to receive the 75th Anniversary Medal of the ASME Heat Transfer Division in recognition of his service to the heat transfer community and contributions to the field. Dr. Ayyaswamy's research is in the area of mechanical engineering, with concentration in modeling, simulations and experimentation of multi-phase flow/heat and mass transfer. His latest research activities are concerned with the motion of nanoparticles and associated transport, particularly in the context of targeted drug delivery. Ayyaswamy, an ASME Fellow, has contributed to many diverse areas of heat transfer, mass transfer, and fluid mechanics. These include investigations of finite-sized bubble motion and the effects of surfactants in the context of gas embolism; forced convective effects on condensation, evaporation and combustion of moving drops and particles; the effect of electric fields on flames under normal and microgravity conditions; capillary flows related to heat pipes; and buoyancy driven flows. He was also the recipient of the ASME Worcester Reed Warner Medal in 2007 and the ASME Heat Transfer Memorial Award in 2001. The 75th Anniversary Medal will be presented at the 2013 Summer Heat Transfer Conference, to be held in Minneapolis from July 14-19.

 

Brian T. Helenbrook

Brian T. Helenbrook
Brian T. Helenbrook

ASME member Brian T. Helenbrook Helenbrook has been promoted from associate professor to full professor of mechanical and aeronautical engineering in the Coulter School of Engineering at Clarkson University in Potsdam, N.Y. Helenbrook's expertise is in the areas of computational fluid mechanics and multi-phase flows. Some of his current projects include designing a novel wind turbine, manufacturing of solar cell wafers, thermal modeling of electronic circuits and aerodynamic optimization of luge sleds for the U.S. Olympic luge team. He teaches graduate and undergraduate courses in the areas of fluid mechanics, computational fluid dynamics and finite element methods. Helenbrook earned a bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering from the University of Notre Dame, and a master's degree and doctorate in mechanical engineering from Princeton University. After completing his Ph.D., Helenbrook was a post-doctoral researcher at Stanford University, funded by the Applied Strategic Computing Initiative. He was a fellow in the NASA Faculty Fellowship program at NASA Langley in 2002 and at NASA Kennedy in 2005. He also spent a year as a visiting faculty member at the Université catholique de Louvain in Belgium. Helenbrook has published 34 peer-reviewed journal articles and 16 refereed conference papers and contributed to 50 conference presentations since he joined the Clarkson faculty.

 

Sam Y. Zamrik

Sam and Myrna Zamrik
Sam and Myrna Zamrik

Former ASME President Sam Y. Zamrik and his wife, Myrna, who established a scholarship at the Pennsylvania State University in 1992, have increased the amount of their endowment with a pledge of an additional $50,000 gift. The couple's scholarship, the Sam Y. and Myrna R. Zamrik Scholarship in Engineering Science and Mechanics, is awarded to full-time students who are enrolled in Penn State's department of engineering science and mechanics. Zamrik, a professor emeritus of engineering mechanics, has said that scholarship aid from NASA and the Ford Foundation helped him finish his master's degree, just as a teaching fellowship enabled him to earn his doctoral degree. Zamrik received a bachelor's degree in mathematics and a bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering at the University of Texas at Austin in 1955 and 1957, respectively. He went on to Penn State, where he received a master's degree and Ph.D. in engineering mechanics in 1961 and 1965. He then became a faculty member at Penn State, and served in the engineering science and mechanics department for 38 years. A Fellow of ASME, Zamrik served as the Society's 126th president (2007-2008), Board of Governors (2002-2005), and vice president of the Materials and Structures Group (1998-2001), and numerous other ASME positions. He was named an Honorary Member of the Society in 2010. Zamrik has been the recipient of many ASME awards during his more than 40 years of membership, including the Pressure Vessels and Piping Division's Robert M. McGrattan Literature Award in 1991, the Central Pennsylvania Section's Outstanding Mechanical Engineer of the Year Award in 1992, the Pressure Vessel and Piping Medal in 1996, and an ASME Dedicated Service Award in 2006. In 2010, the Pressure Vessel and Piping Medal was renamed as the ASME S.Y. Zamrik PVP Medal, a tribute for his continued service to the division.

 

Ramesh (R.D.) Patel, P.E.

Ramesh (R.D.) Patel, P.E.
Ramesh (R.D.) Patel, P.E.

ASME member Ramesh (R.D.) Patel, P.E. recently released a book, titled Guide for the Procurement of Engineered Equipment. The 68-page publication is intended to simplify the procurement of complexly engineered equipment into a dozen easy steps, giving the user a quick start in understanding the total procurement cycle. Through this 12-step process, readers receive user-friendly guidance in designing, engineering, quality assurance, and the procurement or manufacturing of complex equipment for any industry, such as power plants, chemical and industrial plants, refineries, mining, or even custom home-building projects. Patel he has worked in the nuclear power plant industry for 40 years, including 35 with GE Nuclear Energy in San Jose, Calif., in various engineering capacities. Patel was a member of several nuclear-related ASME code committees for more than 25 years and is currently a contributing member of one of the nuclear piping code committees. He has co-authored five technical papers in the nuclear field and was a co-inventor for three patents while working at GE Nuclear Energy. A professional engineer in the state of California, Patel has been a consultant for the nuclear industry since retiring from GE in November 2009. His book is now available through Amazon.com.

 

Jonathan Colton, Ph.D., P.E.,

Jonathan Colton, Ph.D., P.E.,
Jonathan Colton, Ph.D., P.E.,

Jonathan Colton, Ph.D., P.E., a professor at the George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering and the School of Industrial Design at the Georgia Institute of Technology, was recently named one of 13 Jefferson Science Fellows for the upcoming academic year of 2013-2014. Established in 2003, the Jefferson Science Fellows program is designed to further build capacity for science, technology and engineering expertise within the U.S. Department of State and U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID). Each Fellow will spend one year at the U.S. Department of State or USAID for an on-site assignment in Washington, D.C., that may also involve extended stays at U.S. foreign embassies or missions. Following the fellowship year, the Jefferson Science Fellow will return to his academic career, but will remain available to the U.S. Department of State and USAID for projects over the subsequent five years. Colton, who will begin his assignment in August, is a Fellow of ASME and of the Society of Plastics Engineers. He is a registered professional engineer in the state of Georgia and a program evaluator for the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology. He is the recipient of a NASA Space Act Award and National Science Foundation's Presidential Young Investigator Award. Prof. Colton's research interests include polymer and polymer composites processing, design, manufacturing, and humanitarian design and engineering. His teaching interests include manufacturing, industrial design, and humanitarian design and engineering. Colton obtained his S.B., S.M., and Ph.D. in mechanical engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, prior to joining Georgia Tech's faculty in 1985.

 

Larry D. Richardson, P.E.,

Larry D. Richardson, P.E.,
Larry D. Richardson, P.E.,

Larry D. Richardson, P.E., chief executive officer of ReEnergy Holdings LLC, has been honored by ASME’s Materials and Energy Recovery Division with its 2013 Medal of Achievement Award. The award recognizes distinguished and continued contributions in the advancement of solid waste processing technology. Richardson, who became CEO of ReEnergy in 2008, is being honored for the many environmental performance improvements he has promoted within the waste-to-energy field. “Larry’s professionalism and leadership in the advancement of environmentally sound and efficient solid waste processing facilities has contributed to the betterment of the industry,” said Nathiel Egosi, P.E., chair of the Honors and Awards Committee for the ASME Materials and Energy Recovery Division. ReEnergy owns and operates facilities using forest-derived woody biomass and other residual fuels to produce renewable energy. Prior to the formation of ReEnergy in 2008, Richardson was the president and chief operating officer of EAC Operations Inc., a company that owned and operated waste-to-energy facilities and related businesses for the collection, processing and transportation of solid waste and recyclable materials. At both ReEnergy and EAC, he has built a reputation for leading management teams that make significant improvement in facility performance and operational efficiencies and establish exemplary health and safety, environmental compliance, and community relations programs. Prior to EAC, Richardson had management, project development and technical positions at companies including ABB/Combustion Engineering, Halliburton/Brown & Root and HDR Engineering. Richardson received a bachelor of science in civil engineering with honors from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and he is a licensed professional engineer.

 

Governor John H. Sununu, Ph.D.

Governor John H. Sununu, Ph.D.
Governor John H. Sununu, Ph.D.

Former New Hampshire Governor John H. Sununu, Ph.D., has been invited to speak at Shenandoah University's 2013 commencement ceremony on May 11. He will also receive an Honorary Doctor of Humanities degree during the ceremony at the university, which is located in Winchester, Va. Sununu, an Honorary Member and Fellow of ASME, served as governor of New Hampshire for three consecutive terms, from 1983-88, before his appointment as White House Chief of Staff under President George H. W. Bush. He also served as counselor to the president. Sununu is president of JHS Associates Ltd. and a former partner in Trinity International Partners, a private financial firm. He was commissioned Chief of Staff to the President of the United States on Jan. 21, 1989, and served in the White House until March 1, 1992. As chief of staff, Sununu oversaw the daily operations of the White House and its staff. He is a member of the board of trustees for the George Bush Presidential Library Foundation. Before becoming governor of New Hampshire, Sununu had a background of nearly 20 years of experience as an educator, engineer, small businessman and community leader. Sununu attended the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) at both the undergraduate and graduate levels, and earned his Ph.D. there in 1966 in mechanical engineering. From 1968 until 1973, he was associate dean of the College of Engineering at Tufts University and associate professor of Mechanical Engineering. Sununu served on the Advisory Board of the Technology and Policy Program at MIT from 1984 until 1989. In 2004, Sununu co-chaired Secretary of Energy Advisory Board, Nuclear Energy Task Force. He was a visiting professor of practice in public service at Harvard's Kennedy School of Government during the 2003-2004 school year. From 1992 until 1998, he co-hosted CNN's nightly news and public affairs program "Crossfire." He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering.

 

Dawn Elliott, Ph.D.

Dawn Elliott, Ph.D.
Dawn Elliott, Ph.D.

ASME member Dawn Elliott, Ph.D., director of the biomedical engineering program at the University of Delaware, has been elected to the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE) College of Fellows as a member of the Class of 2013. Elliott, who was named a Fellow of ASME last fall, joins 1,000 elite bioengineers in academia, industry and government who have been selected for this designation. AIMBE College Fellows are considered highly esteemed members of the bioengineering community, ranking among the top two percent in their field. Elliott was formally inducted into the AIMBE 2013 Class of Fellows for her research on intervertebral disc degeneration. The induction ceremony took place at the National Academy of Sciences Great Hall in Washington, D.C., in February. Elliott joined the University of Delaware in 2011 to help develop the engineering college's fledgling biomedical engineering program, which began in 2010. Under her leadership, the program has developed a strong foothold on campus, with over 50 affiliated faculty performing interdisciplinary biomedical engineering research and a waiting list for students hoping to join the major. Now in its third year, the undergraduate program contains 160 students. Nearly 40 percent of the students are female and nearly one-third are honor students. Elliott spent 12 years in the University of Pennsylvania's departments of orthopaedic surgery and bioengineering and is a recognized leader in research. She is internationally known for her research on osteoarthritis and lower back pain, studying how and why the intervertebral spine and cartilage break down with aging and developing and testing therapeutics used in treatment. She earned her doctoral degree in biomedical engineering from Duke University in 1999. Elliott has served on ASME's Bioengineering Division executive committee and chaired the Summer Bioengineering Conference in Puerto Rico in 2012.

 

Mary Cunningham Boyce, Ph.D.

Mary Cunningham Boyce, Ph.D.
Mary Cunningham Boyce, Ph.D.

ASME member Mary Cunningham Boyce, Ph.D., the Ford Professor of Engineering and Department Head of Mechanical Engineering at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, has been appointed as the new dean of Columbia University's Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Science. A distinguished scholar in the field of mechanical engineering and a devoted educator, Boyce spent more than 25 years at MIT, where she held positions on the MIT Engineering Council and the MIT International Advisory Council.

Boyce's research interests include the molecular and nanomechanics of polymers, soft composites and soft tissues—studying the elastic, thermal and kinetic properties of physical systems at the nanometer scale. A graduate of Virginia Tech and MIT, where she earned her Ph.D., Boyce has received numerous honors in recognition of her achievements, including election as Fellow of ASME, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the National Academy of Engineering.

Boyce was the winner of ASME's 1998 Applied Mechanics Young Investigator Award, now known as the Thomas J.R. Hughes Young Investigator Award. Among many Society positions, Boyce served as chair and vice chair of the ASME Applied Mechanics Division, and as chair of the Daniel C. Drucker, Warner T. Koiter and Timoshenko Medal Committees.

 

Ozden Ochoa, Ph.D., P.E.

Ozden Ochoa, Ph.D., P.E.
Ozden Ochoa, Ph.D., P.E.

ASME member Ozden Ochoa, Ph.D., P.E., associate director for science and technology at the Army Research Laboratory Headquarters in Adelphi, Md., and a professor of mechanical engineering at Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas, has received the Wayne W. Stinchcomb Memorial Award from international standards organization ASTM International's Committee D30 on Composite Materials. The Stinchcomb Award is presented every two years at the Committee D30 spring symposium to an individual who has made outstanding contributions in research, engineering, or teaching the technology of composite materials.

Prior to assuming her role at the Army Research Laboratory Headquarters, Ochoa was director of aerospace sciences and materials directorate at the U.S. Air Force Office of Scientific Research in Arlington, Va., and a senior technologist at the Materials and Manufacturing Directorate at Wright Patterson Air Force Base in Ohio. A graduate of Bogazici University (Robert College) in Turkey where she earned a bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering, Ochoa holds both a master's and a doctorate in mechanical engineering from Texas A&M University.

Ochoa, ASME Fellow, held a number of ASME positions, including Board of Governors member (2005-2008), chair and treasurer for the Aerospace Division, vice president of the Board on Communications, chair of the International Congress Committee, chair of Aerospace Division's Structures and Materials Committee, and member of the Inter-Council Committee on Federal R&D. She received the ASME Dedicated Service Award in 2000.

 

Thomas J. Barber, Ph.D

Thomas J. Barber, Ph.D
Thomas J. Barber, Ph.D

ASME member Thomas J. Barber, Ph.D., Professor-in-Residence at the University of Connecticut's mechanical engineering department was among 33 of Connecticut's leading experts in science, engineering and technology who were recently selected to become members of the Connecticut Academy of Science and Engineering this year. Election to the Academy is on the basis of scientific and engineering distinction achieved through significant contributions in theory or applications, as demonstrated by original published books and papers, patents, the pioneering of new and developing fields and innovative products, outstanding leadership of nationally recognized technical teams, and external professional awards in recognition of scientific and engineering excellence.

Barber, who joined the University of Connecticut's mechanical engineering department in 2000, received his bachelor's, master's and Ph.D. degrees in aeronautical engineering from New York University in 1964, 1965 and 1968, respectively. His research specialties are computational and physical fluid dynamics applied to enhanced mixing concepts for low noise, improved mixing and reduced observability. He joined Pratt & Whitney Aircraft in 1968 and was responsible for the development of a variety of numerical solvers and associated physical models for the flow in gas turbine engines. In 1983, he joined the United Technologies Research Center, where he was responsible for the development and application of computational analyses for the investigation of fundamental fluid dynamics problems. Barber has earned three patents for his work in applying enhanced mixing concepts to propulsion system nozzles and fuel cell systems. Barber, an associate fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, also taught graduate mechanical engineering courses for more than 30 years at Rensselaer at Hartford.

 

Alan H. Epstein, Ph.D

Alan H. Epstein, Ph.D
Alan H. Epstein, Ph.D

Alan H. Epstein, Ph.D., vice president of Technology and Environment at Pratt & Whitney, was also selected as a member of the Connecticut Academy of Science and Engineering. Epstein, an ASME Fellow, is responsible for setting the direction for and coordinating technology across Pratt & Whitney as it applies to product performance and environmental impact. He also provides strategic leadership in the investment, development and incorporation of technologies that reduce the environmental impact of Pratt & Whitney's world-wide products and services.

Prior to joining Pratt & Whitney in 2007, Epstein was the R. C. Maclaurin Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where his research and teaching was focused on power and energy, aerospace propulsion, turbomachinery and noise, measurement and instrumentation, and microsystems. He holds numerous patents and has published more than 100 academic articles. He received his bachelor's and master's degrees in science and a Ph.D. in aeronautics and astronautics from MIT. In addition to being an ASME Fellow, Epstein is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and a fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics.

 

Chittaranjan Sahay, Ph.D., P.E.

Chittaranjan Sahay, Ph.D., P.E.,
Chittaranjan Sahay, Ph.D., P.E.

Chittaranjan Sahay, Ph.D., P.E., the Vernon D. Roosa Distinguished Professor of Manufacturing Engineering at the University of Hartford, is one of 33 of Connecticut's leading experts in science, engineering and technology who were selected this year as members of the Connecticut Academy of Science and Engineering.

Sahay is chief executive officer of alternative and renewable energy source development company S2KP Technologies and director of Alternate Energy Solutions Private Ltd., in Ranchi, India. An ASME Fellow, Sahay has served in a number of leadership positions within ASME, including member of the Board of Governors from 2006-2009, and chair of the Electronics Manufacturing Division from 1997-2001. He also served as vice chair of the Manufacturing Engineering Division, vice chair of Technology and Management, vice president of ASME's Mid-Atlantic Region, chair of the Southern Tier Section, member of the Mechanical Engineering Department Heads Committee, and representative to the NCEE/Examinations for Professional Engineers Committee, among many other Society positions. Sahay received the ASME Dedicated Service Award in 1996, and has been an ASME member since 1982.

 

Wilson K.S. Chiu, Ph.D..

Wilson K.S. Chiu, Ph.D.
Wilson K.S. Chiu, Ph.D.

Wilson K.S. Chiu, Ph.D., a professor of mechanical engineering at the University of Connecticut in Storrs, was also elected for Connecticut Academy of Science and Engineering membership. His research focuses on heat and mass transfer with chemical reactions, with applications to materials for sustainable energy applications (fuel cell, battery, CO2 gas separation membrane, electrolyzer, solar cell), carbon nano-materials, photonics, and semiconductors.

Chiu is a member of the ASME Advanced Energy Systems Division's executive committee, chair of the division's Technical Committee on Electrochemical Energy Conversion and Storage, past chair of the ASME Heat Transfer Division K-15 Technical Committee on Transport Phenomena in Manufacturing and Materials Processing, and associate editor for the ASME Journal of Heat Transfer, and the International Journal of Thermal Sciences. A member of ASME since 1991, Chiu received the ASME Bergles-Rohsenow Young Investigator Award in Heat Transfer in 2006.

The newly elected members will be introduced at the Academy's 38th Annual Meeting and Dinner on May 22 at Quinnipiac University in Hamden. Election to the Academy is on the basis of scientific and engineering distinction achieved through significant contributions in theory or applications, as demonstrated by original published books and papers, patents, the pioneering of new and developing fields and innovative products, outstanding leadership of nationally recognized technical teams, and external professional awards in recognition of scientific and engineering excellence.

 

Subra Suresh, Sc.D.

Subra Suresh, Sc.D.
Subra Suresh, Sc.D.

ASME Fellow Subra Suresh, Sc.D., On Feb. 5th, National Science Foundation (NSF) Director Subra Suresh announced that he will step down from his current role at NSF at the end of March to accept an appointment as Carnegie Mellon University's ninth president, effective July. In a note to NSF staff, Dr. Suresh said, "It has been my extraordinary honor to lead the National Science Foundation, which is blessed with a marvelous cohort of highly talented and devoted staff, as well as hundreds of thousands of innovative grantees and investigators from every field of science and engineering. I am grateful for the opportunity to serve the country in this capacity." Commenting on Suresh's accomplishments as NSF Director, John Holdren, Assistant to the President for Science and Technology and Director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy said, "I want to thank Subra Suresh for his outstanding service as Director of the National Science Foundation. Subra has made critical contributions to a broad range of science and technology priorities, including expanding federal investments in fundamental research, accelerating the commercialization of university research, and strengthening our scientific collaborations with partners around the world." Suresh, an ASME Fellow and recipient of ASME's Nadai Medal (2011) and the Timoshenko Medal (2012), was nominated in 2010 by President Barack Obama and unanimously confirmed by the U.S. Senate to lead NSF, a $7 billion independent federal agency charged with advancing all fields of fundamental science and engineering research and related education. Previously, Suresh served as dean of the School of Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and has been on leave as the Vannevar Bush Professor of Engineering at MIT while serving as NSF Director. Suresh has been an ASME member since 1985.

 

David Go, Ph.D.

David Go, Ph.D.
David Go, Ph.D.

ASME Fellow David Go, Ph.D., David Go, assistant professor of aerospace and mechanical engineering at the University of Notre Dame, has been named a recipient of the 2013 National Science Foundation (NSF) Early Career Development (CAREER) Award. The award is the highest honor given by the U.S. government to young faculty in engineering and science. Go was one of three faculty members from Notre Dame who were honored with the award this year. Go, who was also selected by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research for the 2011 Young Investigator Program, joined the University in 2008. His CAREER project, titled "Low Temperature Microplasmas for Thermal Energy Conversion, Education, and Outreach," aims to establish a new technique to directly convert heat — from the sun, a nuclear reaction or the waste heat from an industrial process — to electricity. Go is investigating thermionic energy conversion, where electrons are ejected from a hot metal and collected by a cool metal to form current, and how to enhance it with a microplasma to make the technique more suitable for terrestrial applications. An ionized gas between the hot and cold surfaces, the microplasma will increase the number of electrons emitted from the hot surface, as well as improve the transport of electrons from the hot to cold surface.

In addition to the fundamental studies conducted as part of this project, Go will also continue a water discovery and analysis program that he initiated with local middle schools. The co-owner of several patents, Go is a member of ASME, the American Society for Engineering Education, the American Society for Mass Spectrometry and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. A graduate of Notre Dame, earning his bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering in 2001, Go also earned a master's degree in 2004 in aerospace engineering from the University of Cincinnati, and a doctorate in mechanical engineering in 2008 from Purdue University. He joined ASME in 2004.

 

Shmuel Einav

Shmuel Einav
Shmuel Einav

ASME Fellow Shmuel Einav, P.E., Ph.D., has received one of the most prestigious annual awards given to an Israeli scientist — the Mifal Hapayis Landau Prize for Scientific Research — for his lifetime achievements in cardiovascular biomedical engineering. Dr. Einav, a professor of biomedical engineering at Stony Brook University, and the Herbert J. Berman Chair for Vascular Bioengineering at Tel Aviv University, received the 2012 Landau at a ceremony in Israel late last month. Established in Israel in 1970, the Landau Prize recognizes achievements and influence of Israeli scholars who have made significant advances in their fields and valuable contributions to the development of science and research. Previous winners include internationally recognized scientists such as Ada Yonat of the Weizmann Institute, and Aaron Ciechanover of the Technion, a recipient of the Nobel Prize in Chemistry. According to the Mifal Hapayis judges, Einav received the Landau Prize because of his “innovative achievements and groundbreaking medical research, initiating and constructing the field of Biomedical Engineering in Israel and worldwide, for his contributions to the advancement of research in Cardiovascular Medicine for the benefit of mankind, the development of instructional programs in Biomedical Engineering in Israel and worldwide, teaching and instructing many generations of engineers, scientists and physicians, and extensive public advocacy.” The organization cited that as a world authority in biomedical engineering, Einav is “credited with breakthroughs on blood flow and cardiac activity, computational approaches to assess the severity of the disease and efficacy of treatment, and the development of medical devices and implantable systems for the diagnosis and treatment of heart disease and blood vessels.” Among the cardiovascular medical devices and systems created by Einav are heart valves, ventricular assist devices, total artificial heart, a method for opening blocked arteries, diagnosing vulnerable plaques, and the use of nanotechnologies for recovery and regeneration of blood vessels. He is also the holder of numerous patents, including an intra-aortic pumping apparatus, a method for determining the degree of occlusion and elasticity in blood vessels, and a method and apparatus for magnetic resonance imaging of flow. Einav has been an ASME member since 1973.

 

Shapour Azarm

Shapour Azarm
Shapour Azarm

Shapour Azarm, P.E., Ph.D., was recently named editor of the ASME Journal of Mechanical Design. Azarm is the director of the Design Decision Support Lab and professor of mechanical engineering at the University of Maryland in College Park. His research concerns models and methods for Design for Market Systems (DMS), Multi-Criteria Decision Making (MCDM), and Multidisciplinary Design Optimization (MDO). Azarm, an ASME Fellow who received his doctorate in mechanical engineering from the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, has had more than 30 articles published in the Journal of Mechanical Design (formerly the Journal of Mechanisms, Transmissions, and Automation in Design). He served as an associate editor of the Journal for three terms: 1993-1995, 2003-2006, and 2006-2009. He served as a guest editor/co-editor of two special issues of the Journal of Mechanical Design. One of these special issues was on “Robust and Reliability Based Design” that appeared in July 2006, and the other on “Designing Complex Engineered Systems” that appeared in October 2011. An advisory board member for the ASME Journal of Computing and Information Science in Engineering, he is also an associate editor of Structural and Multidisciplinary Optimization and Mechanics-Based Design of Structures and Machines, and an editorial board member for the International Journal of Reliability and Safety. Azarm is an operating board member of the ASME Systems and Design Group, a member-at-large of the ASME Committee on Division Operations and Training, member and past chair of the ASME Design Engineering Division (DED) Advisory Committee, and past chair of the ASME Design Automation Committee, among many other Society positions. In 2007, he received the ASME Design Automation Award for his “sustained and meritorious contributions to research in design automation, specifically in computational design optimization and engineering design decision making.” With two of his students, he received the Best Paper Award in the 2009 ASME Design Automation Conference. Azarm has been an ASME member since 1985.

 

Alma Martinez Fallon

Alma Martinez Fallon
Alma Martinez Fallon

Alma Martinez Fallon, director of supply chain procurement for Huntington Ingalls Industries' Newport News Shipbuilding (NNS) division, is a recipient of an Inside Business 2012 Women in Business Achievement Award. Fallon was presented with the award during a banquet held last month in Newport News, Va. Women in Business Achievement Award recipients are selected by a panel of judges that reviews nominations from the public. The award program was launched 10 years ago by Inside Business, the Hampton Roads business journal, to celebrate women who are successful in their careers, have made a significant impact on the business community and local economy, and have served as mentors and examples to others. The weekly business publication honored 25 community leaders with the award this year. Fallon is responsible for about $1billion in material annually, subcontracting and service requirements for all programs at NNS, and joint procurement with General Dynamics Electric Boat, NNS' partner in the building of Virginia-class submarines. She is also a visible leader in the engineering profession. Fallon was the national president of the Society of Women Engineers in 2004 and is a senior life member of the organization. She is currently a member on the ASME Committee on Finance and Investment. An ASME Fellow, Fallon is also a former member of the Society's Board of Governors, a former chair of the Nominating Committee, and a former member of the Committee on Staff, among many other Society posts. Fallon also served as the 2007 chair of the American Association of Engineering Societies. Fallon, an ASME member since 1987, received the ASME Dedicated Service Award in 2002.

 

Sinan Keten

Sinan Keten
Sinan Keten

SME member Sinan Keten, assistant professor of civil and environmental engineering and mechanical engineering at Northwestern University, has been awarded the ASME Applied Mechanics Division's Haythornthwaite Research Initiation Grant. The award honors university faculty engaged in research in theoretical and applied mechanics that are at the beginning of their academic careers. Prof. Keten received his Ph.D. from MIT and joined Northwestern's McCormick School of Engineering and Applied Science in the fall of 2010. Keten's research currently focuses on using molecular modeling and theory to rapidly discover bioinspired materials that utilize building blocks and design strategies that are found in nature. The specific focus of this project is a new class of synthetic peptide nanostructures that are called polymer-conjugated cyclic peptide nanotubes (pc-CPNs). The knowledge gained from these studies will potentially have an impact on selective membrane technologies that are needed for advancements in water purification, batteries, fuel cells and carbon dioxide capture. His theoretical research is carried out in close collaboration with synthesis and experimental efforts by Ting Xu, associate professor of materials science and chemistry at University of California, Berkeley, and Brett Helms, staff scientist in the Organic and Macromolecular Synthesis Facility at Berkeley Lab's Molecular Foundry. The team's research was recently selected as one of the 14 projects that will receive funding by the National Science Foundation under the federal Materials Genome Initiative (www.whitehouse.gov/mgi). Keten has been an ASME member since 2009.