Dynamic Systems and Control Conference

DSCC

Dynamic Systems and Control Conference

Tysons Corner, Virginia

Conference
October 11-13, 2017

Program - Plenary Sessions

 

Date: Wednesday, October 11, 2017
Time: 8:30am – 9:30am
Room: Fairfax A Ballroom

Petros A. Ioannou

Petros A. Ioannou, University of Southern California

PLENARY

Connectivity and Feedback Control and Optimization in Transportation

Abstract
One of the major obstacles to effectively control and optimize transportation systems is the lack of adequate measurements. Current vehicles operate as passive users of a system that operates as open loop most of the time. Connectivity such as Vehicle to infrastructure (VtoI) and vehicle to vehicle (VtoV) communications will make the measurement of the traffic flow characteristics such as speed, flow, density, incidents etc easy to obtain and used by controllers to effectively control traffic dynamics and optimize decisions. Vehicles will become simultaneous sensors and actuators and participate in effectively controlling and optimizing transport operations and systems.

In this talk we consider several applications where we design effective control systems and optimization techniques by assuming adequate connectivity between vehicles and infrastructure to improve capacity in traffic and freight transport. We show how a combined lane change and variable speed controller can eliminate capacity drops at bottlenecks with consistent improvements in travel time and number of stops with positive impact on the environment. We present a co-simulation approach for freight routing in a multimodal transportation system, an empty container re use optimization system, traffic light control with truck priority and a dynamic headway approach for positive train control. These different applications and techniques demonstrate the expected revolution in transportation efficiency that connectivity between vehicles and infrastructure can bring when implemented.

Biography
Petros A. Ioannou received BSc degree from University College, London in 1978 and the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois, in 1980 and 1982, respectively. In 1982, he joined the Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Southern California where he is currently the A.V. ‘Bal’ Balakrishnan Chair Professor and Director of the Center of Advanced Transportation Technologies and Associate Director for Research of METRANS, a University Transportation Center. He also holds a courtesy appointment with the Department of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering and the Department of Industrial Systems Engineering. His research interests are in the areas of adaptive control and vehicle dynamics, Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) and urban transportation for freight and people. He is the co-recipient of the 1984 IEEE Control System Society Axelby Best Paper Award. He received the 1985 Presidential Young Investigator Award, the 2009 IEEE Intelligent Transportation System (ITS) Society Outstanding ITS Application Award, the 2009 Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET) Heaviside Medal for Achievement in Control, the 2012 IEEE ITS Society Outstanding ITS Research Award and the 2016 IEEE Transportation Technologies Field Award. He is a Fellow of IEEE, IFAC and IET and the author/co-author of 8 books and over 400 research papers in the areas of controls and intelligent transportation systems.


Date: Thursday, October 12, 2017
Time: 8:30am – 9:30am
Room: Fairfax A Ballroom

Francesco Bullo

Francesco Bullo, UC Santa Barbara

PLENARY

Network Science and Kuramoto Oscillators

Abstract
Network systems are mathematical models for the study of cooperation, propagation, synchronization and other dynamical phenomena that arise among interconnected agents. Network systems are widespread in science as fundamental modeling tools. They also play a key growing role in technology, e.g., in the design of power grids, cooperative robotic behaviors and distributed computing algorithms. Their study pervades applied mathematics.

This talk will review established and emerging frameworks for modeling, analysis and design of network systems. I will survey the available comprehensive theory for linear network systems and then highlight selected nonlinear concepts. Next, I will focus on recent developments on the analysis of security and transmission capacity in power grids. I will review the Kuramoto model of coupled oscillators and present recent results on its synchronization behavior.

Biography
Francesco Bullo is a Professor with the Mechanical Engineering Department and the Center for Control, Dynamical Systems and Computation at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He was previously associated with the University of Padova, the California Institute of Technology, and the University of Illinois. His research interests focus on network systems and distributed control with application to robotic coordination, power grids and social networks. He is the coauthor of "Geometric Control of Mechanical Systems" (Springer, 2004) and "Distributed Control of Robotic Networks" (Princeton, 2009); his forthcoming "Lectures on Network Systems" is available on his website. He received best paper awards for his work in IEEE Control Systems, Automatica, SIAM Journal on Control and Optimization, IEEE Transactions on Circuits and Systems, and IEEE Transactions on Control of Network Systems. He is a Fellow of IEEE and IFAC. He has served on the editorial boards of IEEE, SIAM, and ESAIM journals, and will serve as IEEE CSS President in 2018.


Date: Thursday, October 12, 2017
Time: 6:30pm – 9:30pm
Room: Fairfax B Ballroom

Miroslav Krstic

Miroslav Krstic, University of California San Diego

OLDENBURGER LECTURE

Traffic Congestion Control: A PDE Backstepping Perspective

Abstract
Control of freeway traffic using ramp metering is a "boundary control" problem when modeling is approached using widely adopted coupled hyperbolic PDE models of the Aw-Rascle-Zhang type, which include the velocity and density states, and which incorporate a model of driver reaction time. Unlike the "free traffic" regime, in which ramp metering can affect only the dynamics downstream of the ramp, in the "congested traffic" regime ramp metering can be used to suppress stop-and-go oscillations both downstream and upstream of the ramp – though not both simultaneously. Controlling the traffic upstream of a ramp is harder – and more interesting – because, unlike in free traffic, the control input doesn’t propagate at the speed of the vehicles but at a slower speed, which depends on a weighted difference between the vehicle speed and the traffic density. I will show how PDE backstepping controllers, which have been effective recently in oil drilling and production applications (similarly modeled by coupled hyperbolic PDEs), can help stabilize traffic, even in the absence of distributed measurements of vehicle speed and density, and when driver reaction times are unknown.

Biography
Miroslav Krstic is Distinguished Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, holds the Alspach endowed chair, and is the founding director of the Cymer Center for Control Systems and Dynamics at UC San Diego. He also serves as Sr. Assoc. Vice Chancellor for Research at UCSD. As a graduate student, Krstic won the UC Santa Barbara best dissertation award and student best paper awards at CDC and ACC. Krstic is Fellow of IEEE, IFAC, ASME, SIAM, and IET (UK), Associate Fellow of AIAA, and foreign member of the Academy of Engineering of Serbia. He has received ASME Oldenburger Medal, ASME Nyquist Lecture Prize, ASME Paynter Outstanding Investigator Award, the PECASE, NSF Career, and ONR Young Investigator awards, the Axelby and Schuck paper prizes, the Chestnut textbook prize, and the first UCSD Research Award given to an engineer. Krstic has also been awarded the Springer Visiting Professorship at UC Berkeley, the Distinguished Visiting Fellowship of the Royal Academy of Engineering, the Invitation Fellowship of the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, and honorary professorships from four universities in China. He serves as Senior Editor in IEEE Transactions on Automatic Control and Automatica, as editor of two Springer book series, and has served as Vice President for Technical Activities of the IEEE Control Systems Society and as chair of the IEEE CSS Fellow Committee. Krstic has coauthored twelve books on adaptive, nonlinear, and stochastic control, extremum seeking, control of PDE systems including turbulent flows, and control of delay systems.


Date: Friday, October 13, 2017
Time: 8:30am – 9:30am
Room: Fairfax A Ballroom

Daniela Rus

Daniela Rus, MIT

NYQUIST LECTURE

The Robots Are Coming: Spotlight on Autonomous Vehicles

Abstract
The digitization of practically everything coupled with the mobile Internet, the automation of knowledge work, and advanced robotics promises a future with democratized use of machines and wide-spread use of robots and customization. However, pervasive use of robots remains a hard problem. Where are the gaps that we need to address in order to advance toward a future where robots are common in the world and they help reliably with physical tasks? What is the role of computation along this trajectory? In this talk I will discuss challenges and opportunities toward pervasive use of robots. I will use transportation as a case study. Self-driving cars have the potential to increase the safety and efficiency of our transportation systems, enhance the driving experience, provide members of retirement communities with greater independence, and give all of us the ability to go anywhere anytime. I will focus on autonomous cars and mobility on demand with self-driving cars. Specifically, I will talk about the state of the art in perception, planning, coordination, and mobility on demand, and present results from extensive experiments with autonomous vehicles developed over the past 7 years. I will also address some of the technological challenges and policy challenges ahead.

Biography
Daniela Rus is the Andrew (1956) and Erna Viterbi Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and Director of the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) at MIT. She serves as the Director of the Toyota-CSAIL Joint Research Center and is a member of the science advisory board of the Toyota Research Institute. Rus' research interests are in robotics, mobile computing, and data science. Rus is a Class of 2002 MacArthur Fellow, a fellow of ACM, AAAI and IEEE, and a member of the National Academy of Engineering and of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. She is the recipient of the 2017 Engelberger Robotics Award from the Robotics Industries Association. She earned her PhD in Computer Science from Cornell University. Prior to joining MIT, Rus was a professor in the Computer Science Department at Dartmouth College.