Dynamic Systems and Control Conference

DSCC

Dynamic Systems and Control Conference

Atlanta, Georgia

Conference
Sept 30 - Oct 3, 2018

Program - Plenary Sessions

 

Date: Monday, October 1
Time: 8:30am – 9:30am
Room: International Ballroom, Lower Level 1

Nyquist Lecture

Huei Peng

Huei Peng, University of Michigan

How Control Theories Were Used to Improve Energy and Safety of Automotive systems

Abstract: Tomorrow’s vehicles will be more electrified, connected, automated, and shared compared with vehicles today. Modeling and control will continue to play a key role in making these vehicles safer, more efficient, and less polluting. In this talk, I will present my personal experience in applying advanced modeling and control techniques to several automotive applications, to improve their safety and energy consumption. The talk will end with future trend and remaining challenges.

Biography
Huei Peng received his Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering from the University of California, Berkeley in 1992. He is now a Professor at the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Michigan. His research interests include adaptive control and optimal control, with emphasis on their applications to vehicular and transportation systems. His current research focuses include design and control of electrified vehicles, and connected/automated vehicles. In the last 10 years, he was involved in the design of several military and civilian concept vehicles, including FTTS, FMTV, Eaton/Fedex, and Super-HUMMWV—for both electric and hydraulic hybrid concepts. He served as the US Director of the DOE sponsored Clean Energy Research Center—Clean Vehicle Consortium, which supports more than 30 research projects related to the development of clean vehicles in the US and in China. He currently serves as the Director of Mcity, which studies connected and autonomous vehicle technologies and promotes their deployment. He has served as the PI or co-PI of more than 50 research projects, with a total funding of more than 50 million dollars. He has more than 250 technical publications, including 110 in referred journals and transactions and four books. His h-index is 69 according to the Google scholar analysis. The total number of citations to his work is more than 18,000. He believes in setting high expectation and helping students to exceed it by selecting innovative research topics with real impact. One of his proudest achievements is that more than half of his Ph.D. students have each published at least one paper cited more than 100 times. Huei Peng has been an active member of the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME). He is both an SAE fellow and an ASME Fellow. He is a ChangJiang Scholar at the Tsinghua University of China.

Date: Tuesday, October 2
Time: 8:30am – 9:30am
Room: International Ballroom, Lower Level 1

Marcia O’Malley

Marcia O’Malley, Rice University

Towards robots that teach and learn through physical human-robot interaction

Abstract: Robots are increasingly transitioning from factories to human environments: today we use robots in healthcare, households, and social settings. In such circumstances where the human and the robot work in close proximity---physical interactions are almost inevitable. In the past, these physical interactions have typically been treated as a disturbance, which should be avoided or rejected. But physical interaction offers an opportunity for the human and robot to implicitly communicate; when the robot guides the human, or the human corrects the robot, the human and robot are leveraging physical interactions to inform each other about some aspect of the current task. This talk will explore how robots can both teach and learn from humans through physical interaction.

Biography
Marcia O’Malley is the Stanley C. Moore Professor of Mechanical Engineering, of Computer Science, and of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Rice University. She received the Bachelor of Science degree in mechanical engineering from Purdue University, and her MS and PhD in mechanical engineering from Vanderbilt University. She currently serves as Special Advisor to the Provost on Educational and Research Initiatives in Collaborative Health. She is also the Director of Rehabilitation Engineering at TIRR-Memorial Hermann Hospital. Her research addresses issues that arise when humans physically interact with robotic systems, with a focus on training and rehabilitation in virtual environments. She has twice received the George R. Brown Award for Superior Teaching at Rice University. She is a Fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, and serves as an associate editor for the IEEE Transactions on Robotics and as a senior associate editor for the ACM Transactions on Human Robot Interaction.

Date: Tuesday, October 2
Time: 7:00pm – 7:45pm
Room: International Ballroom, Lower Level 1

Oldenberger Lecture

Roberto Horowitz

Roberto Horowitz, UC Berkeley

Title: Modeling, Control and Estimation of Traffic Road Networks

Abstract: This talk discusses some of our recent advancements in management and estimation of traffic road networks. Traffic congestion is a major source of world-wide inefficiency, with one study estimating that, in 2014, delays due to congestion cost 7 billion hours and $160B in the US alone. However, mitigating congestion through management techniques is difficult, as traffic congestion exists in a confluence of complex phenomena, such as nonlinear shockwaves, emergent macroscopic network effects from multiple agents, and low system observability and controllability. Growth of traffic demand shows no sign of decreasing, so continued infrastructure expansion must be combined with continued development of traffic control engineering to abate these societal costs. Some of today's traffic control efforts make use of novel formulations of these nonlinear systems and new sources of data provided by the connected and autonomous vehicles now entering the fleet.

Biography
Roberto Horowitz is a Professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at UC Berkeley and holds the James Fife Endowed Chair in the College of Engineering. He received a B.S. degree with highest honors in 1978 and a Ph.D. degree in 1983 in mechanical engineering from the University of California at Berkeley and became a faculty member of the Mechanical Engineering Department in 1982. Dr. Horowitz teaches and conducts research in the areas of adaptive, learning, nonlinear and optimal control, with applications to Micro-Electromechanical Systems (MEMS), computer disk file systems, robotics, mechatronics and Intelligent Vehicle and Highway Systems (IVHS). He is currently the Chair of the Department of Mechanical Engineering Department is a former co-director of the Partners for Advanced Transportation Technology (PATH) research center at U.C. Berkeley. Dr. Horowitz is a member of IEEE and ASME and the recipient of the 2010 ASME Dynamic Systems and Control Division (DSCD) Henry M. Paynter Outstanding Investigator Award.

Date: Wednesday, October 3
Time: 8:30am – 9:30am
Room: International Ballroom, Lower Level 1

Magnus Egerstedt

Magnus Egerstedt, Georgia Institute of Technology

Long Duration Autonomy and Constraint-Based Coordination of Multi-Robot Systems

Abstract: By now, we have a fairly good understanding of how to design coordinated control strategies for making teams of mobile robots achieve geometric objectives in a distributed manner, such as assembling shapes or covering areas. But, the mapping from high-level tasks to these objectives is not particularly well understood. In this talk, we investigate this topic in the context of long duration autonomy, i.e., we consider teams of robots, deployed in an environment over a sustained period of time, that can be recruited to perform a number of different tasks in a distributed, safe, and provably correct manner. This development will involve the composition of multiple barrier certificates for encoding the tasks and safety constraints, as well as a detour into ecology as a way of understanding how persistent environmental monitoring, as a special instantiation of the long duration autonomy concept, can be achieved by studying animals with low-energy life-styles, such as the three-toed sloth.

Biography
Magnus Egerstedt is the Executive Director for the Institute for Robotics and Intelligent Machines at the Georgia Institute of Technology and a Professor and the Julian T. Hightower Chair in Systems and Controls in the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering. He received the M.S. degree in Engineering Physics and the Ph.D. degree in Applied Mathematics from the Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden, the B.A. degree in Philosophy from Stockholm University, and was a Postdoctoral Scholar at Harvard University. Dr. Egerstedt is a Fellow of the IEEE and a recipient of a number of research and teaching awards, including the Ragazzini Award from the American Automatic Control Council.