ASME.org's Top 10
Most-Read Features
of 2012


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2012 was a year for capturing the imagination on ASME.org. In addition to wildly popular stories on iPad apps for engineers and our annual salary survey feature, the other stories in our annual "Top 10 Most-Read" list include some of the most intriguing and fascinating offerings ASME.org has ever published. From a possible bridge connecting North America and Asia, to robot cheetahs stalking battlefields, to a manta-shaped airfoil taking flight, the creative and dynamic nature of mechanical engineering was eloquently captured in the site's content this year.

We invite you to read on for the complete list of 2012's Most Read:

1. 10 iPad Apps for Engineers
There is no hotter topic in the field of engineering today than that of mobile computing, as evidenced by the fact that for the second straight year, ASME.org's "Most Read" feature explores the subject of apps to make engineers more productive in the fast-paced 21st century.

2. Engineering Salaries on the Rise
As the U.S. economy was showing signs of slow recovery from the slump, engineering continued to be one of the most robust professions in 2012, as seen in ASME.org's second annual salary survey report, the second most-read feature last year.

3. An Aircraft Revolution on the Horizon
When a story about the D-Dalus airfoil, an odd-looking aircraft with 360 degrees of mobility, was published earlier this year, we had no idea it would so entrance readers that it would become the third most-read feature of 2012.

4. Connecting Two Continents: The Ultimate Engineering Challenge
Like space colonies and medical tricorders, it seems engineers will never stop dreaming about again connecting North America with Asia.

5. The Cheetah (Bot) of War
Depending on your personality, the fifth most-read story of the year, about robotic cheetahs hunting down enemy combatants on the battlefield, either enthralled or terrified you.

6. Made in Japan: Earthquake-Proof Homes
With the 2011 Japan earthquake and tsunami still fresh in the minds of many readers, this story about homes that literally "jump" along with tremors was the sixth most-read story of the year.

7. Stopping Power
Recycling the energy lost during braking could save gasoline and consequently, money. That always makes for a compelling story.

8. Assembling the Avengers
Examining the engineering behind the summer's biggest blockbuster, complete with Iron Man, Captain America, and the SHIELD helicarrier. How would this story not make the most-read list?

9. New Images Illuminate the Titanic
On the 100th anniversary of the sinking of the Titanic, researchers using some of today's most advanced technology fused sonar and optical data gathered in 12,600-ft depths to produce detailed images of the wreck that should help experts finally determine how and why the ship sank so fast.

10. Using Waste Engine Heat in Automobile Engines
As mentioned earlier, saving gasoline and money makes for a very popular story. This article describes a practical approach to reducing fuel consumption and carbide dioxide emissions.

Also read ASME.org's Most Popular Videos and Podcasts of 2012

The creative and dynamic nature of mechanical engineering was eloquently captured in the site’s content this year.

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December 2012

by The Editors, ASME.org