January 8, 2016
Capitol Update

In this issue:


LAST CHANCE TO REGISTER FOR OUR ASME GOVERNMENT RELATIONS WEBINAR! "ASME FEDERAL GOVERNMENT FELLOWSHIPS: TECHNOLOGY INTERSECTING POLICY AND POLITICS"

ASME Members and non-members are invited to join ASME Government Relations for a webinar scheduled for Thursday, January 14, 2016 from 12:00pm-1:00pm (EST)  highlighting a current and a former ASME Congressional Fellow, both of whom will be providing their personal perspectives on the accomplishments and challenges associated with the Fellowship. Guest speakers will include:

  • Kalan Guiley, Chair of the Committee on Government Relations, will host the webinar and provide general information about the Fellowship program and current opportunities. Guiley has been a member of the ASME Committee on Government Relations since 2007, and has served as VP/Chair since 2013.  He works for The Boeing Company as the Manager of Continued Airworthiness for Twin-Aisle Airplanes.
  • Dr. Briana Tomboulian, ASME's 2015 Congressional Engineering Fellow, has been serving in the office of the Honorable Edward Markey (D-MA), U.S. Senate since January 2015, where she has been working on energy, environment and manufacturing issues. Dr. Tomboulian came to ASME's Fellowship program from a NASA Space Technology Research Fellowship program, where she spent time at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center and Glenn Research Center developing critical components for deep-space power systems. She received her Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering (ME) from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst and her B.S. in Engineering Science from Smith College.
  • Stephen Lehrman served as ASME's 2006 Congressional Engineering Fellow for the Honorable Mark Pryor (D-Ark), U.S. Senate. After his fellowship ended in 2006, Mr. Lehrman was offered - and accepted - a position as Legislative Assistant for Sen. Pryor. He was ultimately promoted to Senior Legislative Assistant for the economy, tax, budget, banking, housing, small business, energy, environment, and science and technology policy issues. Prior to working on Capitol Hill, he founded an intellectual property consulting and marketing firm, LabraTek Consulting, and worked for RTI International, Fuentek LLC, Corporate Consulting and Development Company, and Stone & Webster Engineering.  A registered professional engineer, Mr. Lehrman received his M.S. in ME from Northeastern University, and his B.S. in ME from Brown University. Mr. Lehrman is currently working as an independent contractor for the National Nanotechnology Coordination Office.

Register today for the webinar at: https://engage.vevent.com/rt/asme~asme_congressional_fellowships

Additional information about the webinar, as well as our 2016 ASME Congressional Fellowship and America Makes Fellowship, is available on the ASME Public Policy Education Center at http://ppec.asme.org/ Please share this link with interested colleagues.


NIST ISSUES NOTICE OF INTENT TO FUND NEW MANUFACTURING INNOVATION INSTITUTES

The U.S. Commerce Department’s National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has issued a Notice of Intent to fund up to two institutes as part of the National Network for Manufacturing Innovation (NNMI). For its first institutes, the Commerce Department will provide up to a total of $70 million per institute over five to seven years. Commerce funding must be matched by private and other non-federal sources. The institutes are expected to become self-sustainable within the time period of the award.

This will be the first NNMI solicitation in which the funding agency has not predetermined an institute’s area of focus. NIST is open to receiving proposals in any topic of interest to industry, particularly those relevant to manufacturing robotics and biopharmaceutical manufacturing. These two subject areas were identified by the President's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST) Advanced Manufacturing Partnership as technology areas critical to supporting national needs.

A Collaborative Manufacturing Robotics Institute would focus on developing advanced robotic systems that can safely operate in collaboration with humans or other robots, be tasked and re-tasked easily, and be integrated into the rest of an enterprise seamlessly and quickly.

A Biopharmaceutical Manufacturing Institute would center on “biologic” therapies that are manufactured using living cells instead of conventional chemistry. The institute would aim to stimulate innovation in manufacturing that will enable new, more cost effective treatment of disease and solidify the domestic competitiveness of the U.S. biopharma industry.

The Notice of Intent may be viewed at: http://ppec.asme.org/key-issues/manufacturing-innovation-competitiveness/


NEW REPORT: COUNTRIES NEED NATIONAL STRATEGIES TO MAXIMIZE BENEFITS OF THE ‘INTERNET OF THINGS’

The Information Technology and Innovation Foundation's (ITIF) Center for Data Innovation is urging policymakers around the world to establish national strategies to harness and accelerate the potential economic growth and quality of life improvements that could stem from the “Internet of Things.” In a new report, the Center explains how the Internet of Things—the network of ordinary objects embedded with Internet-connected sensors to capture and exchange data—has the opportunity to generate immense economic and societal benefit and why national governments should play a role in maximizing that potential.

The Center’s analysis—"Why Countries Need National Strategies for the Internet of Things"—outlines three key roles governments have in supporting the development and widespread adoption of the Internet of Things:

  • Driving the benefits that come from larger scale use of the Internet of Things through public adoption of the technology and supplying essential public goods like digital skills and radio spectrum.
  • Designing light touch government regulations, especially around data, in order to not reduce the potential value of the Internet of Things.
  • Ensuring that nations avoid an “Internet-of-Things divide,” where some communities and individuals miss out on key technologies.

The report explains that many nations have already recognized that the Internet of Things should be a high priority for government, and some have even begun to develop strategies to support the technology. However, the authors argue that no country has developed and implemented a sufficiently comprehensive strategy.

To review the report, please visit: http://www2.datainnovation.org/2015-national-iot-strategies.pdf


DR. SANJIV MALHOTRA TO LEAD ENERGY DEPARTMENT’S CLEAN ENERGY INVESTMENT CENTER

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced today that Dr. Sanjiv Malhotra will be the first Director of the Clean Energy Investment Center (CEIC), located within the Office of Technology Transitions (OTT). CEIC was established in 2015 to advance private, mission-oriented investment in clean energy technologies that address the present gap in U.S. clean tech investment. CEIC will also help to enhance the availability of DOE’s resources to private sector investors and potential partners in the public.

As the center’s first Director, Dr. Malhotra will be responsible for standing up the CEIC, which will serve as a single point of contact for investors to access technical experts, acquire the latest reports on clean energy technology and identify promising projects. He will also be instrumental in supporting Mission Innovation, an initiative that was announced at the United Nations Climate Change Conference in Paris to dramatically accelerate public and private global clean energy innovation to address global climate change, provide affordable clean energy to consumers, including in the developing world, and create additional commercial opportunities in clean energy. Through the initiative, 20 countries, including the top five most populous nations, committed to double their respective clean energy research and development investment over five years.

Dr. Malhotra brings extensive leadership and experience in sales and international business development, establishing public-private partnerships, managing and directing engineering and research programs at various stages of product development, and attracting private sector equity investments.

For more information, go to: http://ppec.asme.org/key-issues/energy/


NASA RESEARCH COULD SAVE COMMERCIAL AIRLINES BILLIONS IN NEW ERA OF AVIATION

The nation’s airlines could realize more than $250 billion dollars in savings in the near future thanks to green-related technologies developed and refined by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA) aeronautics researchers during the past six years. These new technologies, developed under the purview of NASA’s Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) project, could significantly cut airline fuel use, pollution, and noise from today’s levels.

Created in 2009 and completed in 2015, ERA’s mission was to explore and document the feasibility, benefits and technical risk of inventive vehicle concepts and enabling technologies that would reduce aviation’s impact on the environment. Project researchers focused on eight major integrated technology demonstrations falling into three categories – airframe technology, propulsion technology and vehicle systems integration. By the time ERA officially concluded its six-year run, NASA had invested more than $400 million, with another $250 million in-kind resources invested by industry partners who were involved in ERA from the start.

Here is a brief summary of each of the eight integrated technology demonstrations completed by the ERA researchers:

  • Tiny embedded nozzles blowing air over the surface of an airplane’s vertical tail fin showed that future aircraft could safely be designed with smaller tails, reducing weight and drag. This technology was tested using Boeing’s ecoDemonstrator 757 flying laboratory. Also flown was a test of surface coatings designed to minimize drag caused by bug residue building up on the wing’s leading edge.
  • NASA developed a new process for stitching together large sections of lightweight composite materials to create damage-tolerant structures that could be used in building uniquely shaped future aircraft that weighed as much as 20 percent less than a similar all-metal aircraft.
  • Teaming with the Air Force Research Laboratory and FlexSys Inc. of Ann Arbor, Michigan, NASA successfully tested a radical new morphing wing technology that allows an aircraft to seamlessly extend its flaps, leaving no drag-inducing, noise-enhancing gaps for air to flow through. FlexSys and Aviation Partners of Seattle already have announced plans to commercialize this technology.
  • NASA worked with General Electric to refine the design of the compressor stage of a turbine engine to improve its aerodynamic efficiency and, after testing, realized that future engines employing this technology could save 2.5 percent in fuel burn.
  • The agency worked with Pratt & Whitney on the company’s geared turbofan jet engine to mature an advanced fan design to improve propulsion efficiency and reduce noise. If introduced on the next-generation engine, the technology could reduce fuel burn by 15 percent and significantly reduce noise.
  • NASA also worked with Pratt & Whitney on an improved design for a jet engine combustor, the chamber in which fuel is burned, in an attempt to reduce the amount of nitrogen oxides produced. While the goal was to reduce generated pollution by 75 percent, tests of the new design showed reductions closer to 80 percent.
  • New design tools were developed to aid engineers in reducing noise from deployed wing flaps and landing gear during takeoffs and landings. Information from a successful wind-tunnel campaign, combined with baseline flight tests, were joined together for the first time to create computer-based simulations that could help mature future designs.
  • Significant studies were performed on a hybrid wing body concept in which the wings join the fuselage in a continuous, seamless line and the jet engines are mounted on top of the airplane in the rear. Research included wind-tunnel runs to test how well the aircraft would operate at low speeds and to find the optimal engine placement, while also minimizing fuel burn and reducing noise.

For more information about NASA aeronautics research, go to: http://www.nasa.gov/aeronautics

 

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Website: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/advocacy-government-relations