IDETC/CIE

IDETC/CIE

International Design Engineering Technical Conferences
& Computers & Information in Engineering Conference

Cleveland Convention Center, Cleveland, Ohio

Conference
August 6-9, 2017

 
 

Program - Workshops & Tutorials

 

Workshops and Tutorials provide a unique forum for the sharing of recent research results as well as networking with friends and colleagues. Industry participation is encouraged; particularly to allow additional opportunities for fruitful exchanges between the academic, governmental, and industrial communities.

All workshops and tutorials will be held on Sunday, August 6, 2017.

W1: Topology Optimization Through Examples and Case Studies
9:00am – 4:00pm

W1: Topology Optimization Through Examples and Case Studies
Time: 9:00am – 4:00pm
Room: To Be Determined
Fee: $25

Organizers/Presenters
Krishnan Suresh, University of Wisconsin

Workshop Abstract
The objective of this workshop is to expose the audience to cutting-edge topology optimization techniques. Strategies for posing and solving multi-load, multi-body topology optimization problems will be presented. Recent developments in integrating topology optimization and additive manufacturing will also be discussed.

W2: Design Whodunit: The Who, What, and How of Effective Design Teams
9:00am – 12:00pm

W2: Design Whodunit: The Who, What, and How of Effective Design Teams
Time: 9:00am – 12:00pm
Room: To Be Determined
Fee: $25

Organizers/Presenters
Kathryn W. Jablokow, Pennsylvania State University
Neeraj Sonalkar, Stanford University

Workshop Abstract
In both industry and academia, engineering design is a “team sport” that relies on the successful coordination and collaboration of multiple players to solve complex open-ended problems. What makes some design teams “click” and flourish, while other teams flounder and fail? In this interactive workshop, we will present fundamental principles for developing effective design teams and practice new tools that address “who” is on the team, “how” they interact, and “what” they produce. In particular, participants will explore the following research-based principles and tools for developing effective design teams:

  • Bridging cognitive gaps – Tool: Kirton’s Adaption-Innovation Inventory (KAI)
  • Tracking team interactions – Tool: Interaction Dynamics Notation (IDN)
  • Building shared mental models – Tool: The Idea Mapping Board (IMB)

These principles and tools are part of a new framework for modeling and creating High Performance Design Teams developed by Stanford and Penn State engineering educators with support from the National Science Foundation. The latest research findings based on this framework will also be shared with workshop participants.

W3: Cloud Based Design and Integrated Finite Element Analysis
9:00am – 12:00pm

W3: Cloud Based Design and Integrated Finite Element Analysis
Time: 9:00am – 12:00pm
Room: To Be Determined
Fee: $25

Organizers/Presenters
Ashok V. Kumar, University of Florida, Gainesville
Darren Henry, Onshape

Workshop Abstract
Recent advances towards full-cloud CAD and integrated finite element analysis will be presented at this workshop. Integrating CAD and finite element analysis has been difficult using traditional finite element method due to the challenges of translating complex geometry into a finite element mesh in a fully automated fashion. In this workshop, we will introduce mesh independent finite element analysis based on an immersed boundary approach that allows accurate CAD models to be used without any modification for analysis. Geometry is immersed in an automatically generated background mesh and used for analysis without any loss in geometric accuracy or the need to recreate the solid model as a mesh. This approach also enables the use of B-spline elements that provide continuous solutions for stresses and strains. In addition to demonstrating this technology using commercial cloud based CAD software, we will provide a tutorial on the underlying methodology and its application to various types of analysis including static and dynamic structural analysis as well as thermal analysis and coupled simulations.

W4: Lab Experiments on Individual and Interactive Decision Making in Design
8:00am – 12:00pm

W4: Lab Experiments on Individual and Interactive Decision Making in Design
8:00am – 12:00pm
Room: To Be Determined
Fee: $25

Organizers/Presenters
Zhenghui Sha, University of Arkansas
Jitesh H. Panchal, Purdue University
Ilias Bilionis, Purdue University

Workshop Abstract
Decision-making is at the core of engineering design. While there has been significant progress in using normative theories to support design decision making, the use of experimental methods for decision making in design is relatively recent. The goal of this workshop is to provide a platform for discussion of the state-of-the-art research of human-subject experiments on understanding individual as well as the interactive decision-making in engineering design. The workshop has four learning objectives: a) understanding the benefits and challenges in using controlled lab experiments in design research, b) understanding the process of designing lab experiments with human subjects, c) learning statistical techniques for analyzing behavioral data, and d) gaining familiarity with modern software platforms for conducting lab experiments in interactive decision

W5: The PSI Matrix Framework of Design
8:00am – 12:00pm
CANCELLED

W5: The PSI Matrix Framework of Design
Time: 8:00am – 12:00pm
Room:To Be Determined
Fee:$25

Organizers/Presenters
Yoram Reich, Tel Aviv University
Eswaran Subrahmanian, Carnegie Mellon University

Workshop Abstract
The PSI matrix is a framework for understanding complex design situations and improving their outcome. The framework is a culmination of 3 decades of research on design originated at the Engineering Design Research Center at Carnegie Mellon University and continuing in three continents with numerous people. It has guided us in projects and continues to be developed and serve as a method we use in our projects. The framework has been presented in conferences and workshops in the last 5 years and reported in papers; its latest version will be presented at the workshop. The framework is composed of 3 similar levels addressing what/why of the problem being addressed, who is addressing it and how. The framework allows understanding several aspects that influence the success or failure of projects and their critical interrelationships.

The workshop will provide an introduction to the framework through simple exercises. Subsequently, more complex cases will be analyzed and at the end, the participants, divided in small groups will analyze a case, identify its problematic aspects, and propose solutions. The outcome of these group discussions will be presented at the workshop. The workshop provides a new language to speak about complex situations that is intuitive and powerful.

W6: Using Cyberlearning to Enable Sustainable Engineering Education
1:00pm – 5:00pm
CANCELLED

W6: Using Cyberlearning to Enable Sustainable Engineering Education
Time: 1:00pm – 5:00pm
Room: To Be Determined
Fee: $25

Organizers/Presenters
Karl R. Haapala, Oregon State University
Kathy L. Jackson, Pennsylvania State University
Kyoung-Yun Kim, Wayne State University
Gul E. Okudan Kremer, Iowa State University
Carolyn E. Psenka, Wayne State University
Kamyar Raoufi, Oregon State University
Kijung Park, Pennsylvania State University

Workshop Abstract
Engineering educators have few tools at their disposal to facilitate effective learning of the broad topics encompassed by sustainable engineering. Sustainable engineering tools are either limited in scope or require costly licenses and/or specialized domain knowledge. Thus, open cyberlearning tools, such as the CooL:SLiCE platform introduced in this workshop, provide the opportunity to scaffold the learning of topics related to design, manufacturing and supply chain analysis, and environmental responsibility – all pertinent to sustainable product development. Using active participation, this workshop will examine the current state of sustainable engineering education and will introduce the CooL:SLiCE platform. Participants will envision new approaches to educating engineering students about sustainability topics in formal and informal settings. These approaches may make use of CooL:SLiCE and/or other cyberlearning tools using a constructionist learning approach to supplement conventional engineering education. Participants will work in groups to develop plans for implementing these approaches in their own settings. Participants are recommended to bring a laptop with an internet connection for the working sessions.

W7: Lightweighting Technologies - Design with Aluminum
8:00am – 12:00pm
CANCELLED

W7: Lightweighting Technologies - Design with Aluminum
Time: 8:00am – 12:00pm
Room: To Be Determined
Fee: $25

Organizers/Presenters
Raghu Echempati, Kettering University

Workshop Abstract
The workshop focuses on the teaching and learning (T&L) of lightweight technologies using non-ferrous materials such as aluminium and other non-metals. Basic mechanical and material properties, manufacturing processes, design aspects and design guidelines along with several real life examples and applications of aluminum alloy materials commonly used in automotive and other applications will be discussed. The workshop is suitable for audience with associate degree, 4-year engineering degree or to postgraduate students and practicing engineers. Tips to faculty interested in developing a course on this theme will be provided. Also, tips for using ‘Blended learning’/‘Flipped class room’ will be provided and discussed. Finally, assessment tools such as homeworks, exams and final project will be presented and discussed.

W8: Success as a Student Researcher: Maximizing Your Productivity and Efficiency
1:00pm – 5:00pm

W8: Success as a Student Researcher: Maximizing Your Productivity and Efficiency
Time: 1:00pm – 5:00pm
Room: To Be Determined
Fee: TBD

Organizers/Presenters
Scott Ferguson, North Carolina State University
Bryony DuPont, Oregon State University


Workshop Abstract
The objective of this workshop is to create a forum for students attending the IDETC/CIE conferences to learn about and discuss research practices that maximize productivity and research efficiency. Faculty and Ph.D. students from the design community will present best practices and ways to identify/avoid the common pitfalls that students face. Topics will range from research skills (e.g., how to conduct a literature review, how to develop a research plan) to social skills (how to work with your lab-mates, how to build research networks). Discussion will take place via presentations and open question/discussion periods. It is expected that student attendees will also have opportunities to build cross-university relationships and ramp up their excitement for the conference.

W9: Effective Technical Communication: The Assertion-Evidence Approach
1:00pm – 6:00pm

W9: Effective Technical Communication: The Assertion-Evidence Approach
Time: 1:00pm – 6:00pm
Room: To Be Determined
**See note at bottom for participation requirement.
Fee: $25

Organizers/Presenters
Michael Alley, Pennsylvania State University

Workshop Abstract
The goal of the workshop on Effective Communication: The Assertion-Evidence Approach is to provide a professional development experience and opportunity for community and networking within the Design Engineering Division (DED) of ASME that supports and mentors underrepresented groups. The workshop is designed to provide graduate students and faculty members with professional development activities and to give them the opportunity to make connections with an international network of supportive researchers in their field. In addition to skill development, this workshop will support the development of a network of people within the community from underrepresented groups and others who are interested in supporting the inclusion and growth of underrepresented groups within ASME DED and their success. This workshop will be the eighth annual workshop event of the Broadening Participation Committee of the ASME DED

From an audience’s perspective, many presentations in science and engineering suffer because the talks are unfocused. This lack of focus leads to much noise, which reduces the understanding by the audience. Much of the problem arises from speakers following PowerPoint’s defaults and building their talks on phrase headlines supported by bulleted lists. This workshop presents the assertion-evidence approach (http://www.assertion-evidence.com) to designing scientific presentations. In this approach, the speaker builds the talk on key messages supported by visual evidence. Our research has found that assertion-evidence talks are more focused and much better understood by audiences. In addition, our students (even those initially nervous about making presentations) report that using the assertion-evidence approach has given them more confidence. To this workshop, participants are encouraged to bring a laptop and to create a couple of slides beforehand for their research using the following tutorial: http://www.assertion-evidence.com/tutorial.html.

Participants will also receive a free copy of the book: The Craft of Scientific Presentations by Michael Alley: http://www.craftofscientificpresentations.com

** Note: Registration for this workshop is being handled separately from the main conference registration. If you are interested in attending this workshop, select it during your conference registration process however you MUST also complete the survey via the following link. https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/ASMEIDETC2017_Broadening_Participation_Workshop_Application
IF you are not accepted into this workshop after completing the survey, your $25 workshop fee will be refunded upon request. Questions regarding this specific workshop should directed to Katherine Fu at katherine.fu@me.gatech.edu

T1: Modeling Nonlinear Deflections in Compliant Mechanisms
1:00pm – 4:00pm

T1: Modeling Nonlinear Deflections in Compliant Mechanisms
Time: 1:00pm – 4:00pm
Room: To Be Determined
Fee: $25

Organizers/Presenters
Guimin Chen, Brigham young University

Tutorial Abstract
After reviewing the fundamental beam theories, this tutorial will discuss major challenges in modeling nonlinear deflections in compliant mechanisms, recently developed methods and their use for kinetostatic modeling of compliant mechanisms.

T2: Active Disturbance Rejection Control: An Emerging Industrial Control Technology
1:00pm – 5:00pm

T2: Active Disturbance Rejection Control: An Emerging Industrial Control Technology
Time: 1:00pm – 5:00pm
Room: To Be Determined
Fee: $25

Organizers/Presenters
Zhiqiang Gao, Cleveland State University

Tutorial Abstract
In control theory, disturbance rejection is one of many competing control design objectives, including command following, robust stability, noise sensitivity, etc.; in practice, however, it is often THE design objective that is front and center in the mind of design engineers. This workshop provides an opportunity for students, researchers and practitioners to see how the control problems in a particular domain of applications are reduced to their essence, i.e. disturbance rejection, and what tools are available at our disposal to solve these problems. Through the exposition of the basic design principles and how they are applied in the context of engineering problem-solving, this workshop provides the audience with a comprehensive understanding of Active Disturbance Rejection Control (ADRC). The short simulation code will enable the participants to quickly test the idea of ADRC and to make seamless the integration of ADRC with the domain knowledge and skills of a particular engineering branch. It is through such integration that users of ADRC, most likely the practicing engineers and applied researchers, will be able to take advantage of it freely in solving the pressing problems of today.

T3: New Value Creation Through Emotional Engineering
1:00pm – 5:00pm

T3: New Value Creation Through Emotional Engineering
Time: 1:00pm – 5:00pm
Room: To Be Determined
Fee: $25 Organizers Shuichi Fukuda, Keio University

Tutorial Abstract
The goal of this tutorial is to share the basic idea how important it is to pay attention to the psychological needs of our customers. In fact, diversification and personalization come from their expectations to satisfy their intrinsic motivations and their needs to grow. Emotion is, as their etymologies indicate, very closely associated with motivation. One of the imminent issues of engineering is how we can explore new markets. We have been trying to explore new markets by providing products with better quality or with new functions. But product quality is almost saturating and it becomes increasingly difficult for customers to recognize how much improved their product quality is. And most of new functions are invented from producer’s perspective. But psychology teaches us that people are much more satisfied if things meet their intrinsic motivations. We have been trying to meet their expectations, based on extrinsic motivation, i.e., as rewards or as products. But if we pay more attention to their intrinsic needs, we can satisfy our customers more with less time and efforts. We should pay more attention to process values and we should consider how we can get our customers involved in product development.

T4: Design of MultiBody Legged Robots
8:00am – 12:00pm

T4: Design of MultiBody Legged Robots
Time: 8:00am – 12:00pm
Room: To Be Determined
Fee: $25

Organizers/Presenters
Ferdinando Cannella, Italian Institute of Technology
Giovanni Gerardo Muscolo, Italian Institute of Technology
Mariapaola D’Imperio, Italian Institute of Technology

Tutorial Abstract
The Tutorial aims at giving to the attendands practical knowledge on modelling legged robots. Nowadays, bipeds, quadrupeds, hexapods, etc. are quickly becoming an important part of the mobile mechanisms, then it is important to have the basics in their modelling.

T5: Design and Fabrication of DNA Origami Mechanisms
1:00pm – 4:00pm

T5: Design and Fabrication of DNA Origami Mechanisms
Time: 1:00pm – 4:00pm
Room: To Be Determined
Fee: $25

Organizers/Presenters
Haijun Su, The Ohio State University
Carolos Castro, The Ohio State University

Tutorial Abstract
DNA origami nanotechnology is a recently developed self-assembly process for design and fabrication of complex 3D nanostructures using DNA as a functional material. This tutorial covers some recent progress in applying DNA origami to design kinematic mechanisms at the nanometer scale. These nanomechanisms, which we call DNA Origami Mechanisms (DOM), are made by integrating relatively stiff bundles of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), which function as rigid links, connected by highly compliant single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) strands arranged strategically to function as kinematic joints. The designs of kinematic joints including revolute, prismatic, cylindrical, universal and spherical are presented. The steps as well as the necessary software and experimental methods for designing DOM with DNA origami links and joints are detailed. To demonstrate the designs, we presented the designs of Bennett four-bar and crank-slider linkages. These nanomechanisms can be a central part of nanorobots for applications such as targeted drug delivery, biosensing, and nanomanucturing. We will also present a list of technical challenges and on-going efforts such as design automation and computational modeling. These challenges could also be opportunities for mechanism and robotics community to apply well-developed kinematic theories and computational tools to the design of DNA-based nanorobots and nanomachines.

T6: Fractional Order Mechanics – An Introduction
1:00pm – 5:00pm
CANCELLED

T6: Fractional Order Mechanics – An Introduction
Time: 1:00pm – 5:00pm
Room: To Be Determined
Fee: $25

Organizers/Presenters
YangQuan Chen, University of California, Merced

Tutorial Abstract
This tutorial will give an introduction of a new emerging field of study known as “fractional order mechanics (FOMech).” Fractional calculus is about differentiation or integration of noninteger order. Traditional calculus uses integer order differentiation or integration. As mechanics goes into micro and nano world, more and more “anomalous” behaviors are being observed in materials such as porous medias, particulate systems, soft matters etc. The inherent nature of memory, or hereditary, or long range dependence, or long range interactions in the mechanic systems at the smaller scale prompts us to take a look of the modeling tools we are using. It turns out that, using integer order calculus based tools may limit our insight into the mechanical behaviors at all micro, meso, and macro scales. This workshop will focus on introducing “fractional order mechanics (FOMech)” by covering 1) Motivations and real world needs; 2) Mathematical foundations; 3) Fractional mechanics in classical sense (Bagley-Torvik) (3) Fractional Euler Lagrange mechanics; 4) Fractional variational principle.

T7: Industry Ontology Foundry: A Strategy for Promoting Data Interoperability Across the Enterprise
1:00pm – 5:00pm

T7: Industry Ontology Foundry: A Strategy for Promoting Data Interoperability Across the Enterprise
Time: 1:00pm – 5:00pm
Room: To Be Determined
Fee: $25

Organizers/Presenters
Kemper Lewis, University at Buffalo
Barry Smith, University at Buffalo
Ram Sriram, National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)
Dimitris Kiritsis, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne
Ian Grosse, University of Massachusetts, Amherst

Tutorial Abstract
The workshop will provide an overview of different aspects of the Industry Ontology Foundry (IOF). IOF is an initiative involving academic and industrial partners in a collaboration managed by NIST to create a suite of interoperable, public, domain-ontology modules extending across major areas of digital manufacturing. Modules under consideration/development include: Product Life Cycle, Core Product Model, Functional Basis, Materials and Material Attributes. In addition the IOF community is considering Basic Formal Ontology (BFO) as a unifying top-level ontology, and the workshop will include an introduction to the use of BFO in ontology alignment together with a series of presentations outlining the goals and initial test modules of the Foundry. Opportunities for interaction will be provided at every stage in the agenda.

For more in-depth information.