IDETC/CIE

IDETC/CIE

International Design Engineering Technical Conferences
& Computers and Information in Engineering Conference

Quebec City Convention Center, Quebec City, Canada

Conference
August 26-29, 2018

 
 

Program - Workshops & Tutorials

 

All Sessions are being held on Sunday, August 26th

Workshop 1: Planar Linkage Synthesis using Pole and Rotation Angle Constraints
1:00pm – 5:00pm

Date: Aug 26
Time: 1:00pm – 5:00pm

Organizers/Presenter
Ron Zimmerman
Magna Seating, Research and Development
ron.zimmerman@magna.com

Workshop Abstract
Recent developments in the 2D sketcher capabilities of modern CAD systems allow the creation of dynamic or moveable constrained geometry. Dynamic geometry is a new tool for the design of planar linkages and provides the opportunity for new synthesis methods. One method exploiting the advantages of this new tool is Pole and Rotation angle Constraints (PRC). It has the intuitive, visual advantages of graphical methods and the fast and accurate advantages of analytical methods. PRC provides a single approach for every planar four bar linkage synthesis problem that is not over constrained. Since CAD tools are commonplace in academia and industry there is direct carryover from education to industrial practice. Learn this breakthrough method to solve linkage synthesis problems faster and minimize trial and error since you can easily see thousands of possible solutions. The class will focus on the exact synthesis of four bar linkages for rigid body guidance, point path, function generator and any combination of these tasks

Presenter(s) Biographical Sketch
Ron Zimmerman is a research and development engineering specialist for Magna, the largest automotive supplier in North America. His expertise is in the design of mechanisms and automotive seat structures. He discovered the pole and rotation angle constraint synthesis method and has published several papers at IDETC and in JMR on the topic. He has taught pole and rotation angle constraints within Magna Seating and it is now widely used. Along with 24 years of professional experience, he has a BS in Mechanical Engineering from Brigham Young University and a MS in Mechanical Engineering from Purdue University, and is a licensed professional engineer. He and his wife Ellen are proud the parents of 5 fantastic children.

Expected Background of Participants
Participants are expected to have at least a basic understanding of planar linkage synthesis. Participants will need to bring a computer with a CAD program installed and be capable of using the 2D sketcher to create lines, points and constraints. This will be a hands on workshop. After the theory is explained, participants will get practice implementing PRC by solving sample problems. There will be an emphasis on the practical use of PRC. Participants can expect to be able to use PRC independently by the conclusion of the class. Participants are encouraged to bring their own synthesis problems to solve.

Expected Audience
Professors teaching linkage synthesis, Students interested in planar linkage synthesis, and Practicing mechanical engineers who need to design linkages will all benefit from learning the PRC synthesis method. All participants will gain the knowledge needed to implement the methodology on all types of four bar linkage synthesis tasks. Professors will be able to implement the content into their kinematics curriculum.

Need for the Workshop or Tutorial
Dynamic geometry methods are the linkage synthesis tool of the future and are underrepresented in the current academic curriculum. Disseminating knowledge of the advantages and power of dynamic geometry for linkage synthesis into the academic and professional communities is critical to complete utilization.

Impact
Knowledge of pole and rotation angle constraints (PRC) places solutions to the most complicated planar four bar linkage synthesis tasks within the reach of the undergraduate student. Practicing engineers with a knowledge of these methods will have an advantage in the workplace. PRC provides a single approach for planar linkage synthesis problems and allows the designer to see and evaluate thousands of possible solutions in minutes making the synthesis process much faster than before.

Course Outline

  1. Graphical Methods
  2. Dynamic Geometry
  3. Rigid Body Guidance
    1. Poles and rotation angles
      1. Construction
      2. Properties
    2. General constraint
    3. Fixed and moving pivot lines
    4. Multiple constraints
    5. Practice
  4. Point Path Guidance
    1. Poles and rotation angles
    2. General constraint
    3. Multiple constraints
    4. Practice
  5. Function Generator
    1. Poles and rotation angles
    2. General constraint
    3. Multiple constraints
    4. Practice
  6. Mixed synthesis problems
  7. Summary:
    1. Two questions and One Rule
  8. Application to multi-loop mechanisms

Workshop 2: Important Legal Issues to Consider in Product Design & Development
9:00am – 12:00pm

Date: Aug 26
Time: 9:00am – 12:00pm

Organizers
Kate Tompkins
Ktompkins@lathropgage.com

Abstract
When bringing a new product to market, companies often focus on getting the product in the marketplace and the first orders in the door. However, it is critical to also address important legal tasks that should be performed during product design & development in order to help make this new product a success. For example, does someone else have a patent covering the product? Have you filed for a patent? Have you searched to see what your competitors are protecting? Failing to address these questions prior to product launch can limit what protections can be obtained as well as may result in unwanted legal disputes with competitors.

Presenter(s)
Justin Poplin
jpoplin@lathropgage.com

Patent Attorney
Lathrop Gage LLP

Presenter(s) Biographical Sketch
Justin Poplin is a registered patent attorney and has extensive knowledge of patent laws and regulations. He spends the majority of his time assisting clients with patent issues and has considerable experience managing intellectual property portfolios and counseling clients regarding trademark, copyright, trade secret, licensing, and confidentiality issues.

In addition to being responsible for more standard patent prosecution (e.g., filing patent applications and responding to actions by the Patent and Trademark Office), Mr. Poplin has been the lead patent attorney in litigated matters and has prepared and conducted inter partes reviews, inter partes and ex parte reexaminations, supplemental examinations, and broadening and narrowing reissues. He has aided clients with obtaining patents, enforcing patents, licensing patents, invalidating patents, and avoiding patent infringement in a wide range of technologies, and he is responsible for prosecuting and maintaining patent and trademark matters globally. 

Expected Background of Participants
Professionals in product development. No intellectual property experience required.

Expected Audience
Engineers from industry.
General interest.

Need for the Workshop or Tutorial
Intellectual property considerations are critical in the design process but are often overlooked. Understanding intellectual property issues in product development can allow companies to avoid infringement and also allow them to better protect their own products.

Impact
Upon completion of this workshop participants will be able to:

  • Explain protections granted by patents.
  • Take defined steps to avoid patent infringement when developing products.
  • Take defined steps to protect their own patent rights.
  • Budget for intellectual property costs.

Course Outline
Important Legal Issues to Consider in Product Design & Development

Patents

  • Rights granted by patent
  • Things that can be protected by patent
  • Basic requirements: novelty, nonobviousness
  • Types of patents: utility, design
  • Patent term
  • Types of applications: provisional, nonprovisional
  • Writing your own provisional patent application
  • “Patent Pending”
  • Processes and costs for obtaining patents
  • Patent marking
  • Determining infringement
  • Infringement remedies
  • Inventorship and ownership
  • Costs

Case studies

  • Searching for competitors’ patents during product development
  • Designing around competitors’ patents during product development
  • Analyzing patentability
  • Analyzing inventorship and ownership

Foreign patent issues

  • Timing requirements
  • PCT applications
  • Foreign filing license

Case study

  • International filing strategies

Workshop 3: Success as a Student Researcher: Maximizing Your Productivity and Efficiency
1:00pm – 5:00pm

Date: Aug 26
Time: 1:00pm – 5:00pm

Organizers
Scott Ferguson
scott_ferguson@ncsu.edu

Abstract
The objective of this workshop is to create a forum for students attending the IDETC/CIE conferences to learn about and discuss research practices that maximize productivity and research efficiency. Faculty and Ph.D. students from the design community will present best practices and ways to identify/avoid the common pitfalls that students face. Topics will range from research skills (e.g., how to conduct a literature review, how to develop a research plan) to social skills (how to work with your lab-mates, how to build research networks). Discussion will take place via presentations and open question/discussion periods. It is expected that student attendees will also have opportunities to build cross-university relationships and ramp up their excitement for the conference.

Presenter(s)
Dr. Scott Ferguson, North Carolina State University, scott_ferguson@ncsu.edu
Dr. Bryony DuPont, Oregon State University, bryony.dupont@oregonstate.edu

Presenter(s) Biographical Sketch
Dr. Scott Ferguson is an Associate Professor in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at North Carolina State University. Dr. Ferguson received the NSF CAREER award in 2011 to study how market-based information drives design challenges associated with mass customization. His other research interests include market-driven product line optimization, technical feasibility modeling, reconfigurable system design, the evolution of complex engineered systems, and product family design.

Dr. Ferguson has received funding from NSF, NASA, General Motors, Eastman Chemical, the NC Space Grant, and the American Public Power Association. In 2012 he received the NC State Outstanding Teacher Award. Dr. Ferguson is a member of ASME and AIAA. He is on the AIAA MDO Technical Committee and is the chair of the ASME DED Student and Early Career Professional Committee. He received B.S. degrees in both mechanical and aerospace engineering from SUNY-Buffalo in 2002, and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in mechanical engineering from SUNY-Buffalo in 2004 and 2008, respectively.

Bryony DuPont is an Assistant Professor in the School of Mechanical, Industrial, and Manufacturing Engineering at Oregon State University (Corvallis, Oregon, USA). Her work looks at the development of computational design tools and optimization algorithms for sustainability, specifically renewable energy systems and sustainable product development. Dr. DuPont and the students of Oregon State’s Design Engineering Lab are currently working on projects that include the layout optimization for wind farms, array design for novel wave energy conversion devices, optimization of collaborative power systems, the sustainable redesign of commuting bicycles, and the quantification of sustainability during the early design phase. Dr. DuPont completed her PhD in Mechanical Engineering from Carnegie Mellon University in 2013 in the Integrated Design Innovation Group, and her projects are currently funded by the National Science Foundation, the National Energy Technology Laboratory, Oregon State University, and Oregon BEST/Bonneville Power Association.

Expected Background of Participants
Participants should be undergraduate and graduate students with an interest in conducting research in the field of engineering design.

Expected Audience
This workshop is primarily addressed to early career MS/PhD students, but will also be beneficial to undergraduate student researchers. All undergraduate and graduate students attending the conference are welcome to attend.

Need for the Workshop or Tutorial
While the community has worked to increase the involvement of students at our conference through poster competitions and the student social, this workshop is uniquely positioned to address the technical and social challenges students will face while acting as student researchers. At many institutions, it is left to the individual advisor to explain best research practices and the scope of the engineering design community. This workshop will allow students to learn from other members in the design community and discuss the challenges and solutions they have encountered or developed. Over the last four years this workshop has had over 200 students attend. We look to continuously improve this workshop and to reach more students this year.

Impact
There are three main expected outcomes of this workshop. Student attendees will: 1) learn practices that allow them to be more effective researchers - skills that they will be able to use throughout their careers in engineering; 2) build cross-university relationships that can encourage collaboration and facilitate dissemination of their work; and 3) gain an increased understanding of the ASME IDETC/CIE conference, allowing students to become more active participants and gain an increased appreciation for the diversity and scope of the work being conducted in the engineering design community.

Course Outline
Part 1: Research skill development
Session 1A: Getting started
Finding relevant research papers/conducting a literature review
Effectively reading the papers you find
Developing and defining your research questions
Interactive Activity – Goal Setting
Session 1B: Developing your work
Establishing a research plan
Writing a research proposal/plan of work
Writing conference and journal papers
Building a conference presentation
Interactive Activity – Bad Research Poster Bingo

Part 2: The social aspect of being a student researcher
Session 2A: Being part of a team
Working with lab-mates
Building research collaborations
Interactive Activity – Networking in small groups
Session 2B: Self-improvement
Effective time management
Translating your skills toward an academic or industrial career
Interactive Activity – Accountability
Session 2C: Final Questions Q&A/Panel

Workshop 4: Broadening Participation: Career Development Workshop
1:00pm – 6:30pm

Date: Aug 26 
1:00pm – 6:30pm

Organizers
Christine Toh
ctoh@unomaha.edu

Charlotte de Vries
Cud142@psu.edu

Shraddha Joshi
joshis@andrew.cmu.edu

Abstract
The goal of the workshop on Career Development is to provide a professional development experience and opportunity for community and networking within the Design Engineering Division (DED) of ASME that supports and mentors underrepresented groups. The workshop is designed to provide graduate students and faculty members from underrepresented groups with professional development activities and to give them the opportunity to make connections with an international network of supportive researchers in their field. In addition to skill development, this workshop will support the development of a network of people within the community from underrepresented groups. This workshop will be the tenth annual workshop event of the Broadening Participation Committee of the ASME DED.

Choosing a new career can be a daunting task for anyone, but is especially difficult for recent and prospective Ph.D. graduates. This workshop, led by Josh Henkin of STEM Career services, offers career development experience in order to help current students, as well as academics, understand what choices to make to get the most out of their career path. The workshop will include topics such as: interpreting job posting and tailoring job applications accordingly, building and acquiring necessary skills during academic training for jobs, and networking skills. Equipped with a sense of direction and a method to make the most out of job hunting, we hope participants will leave feeling more competent and self-confident in their respective careers.

** Note: Registration for this workshop is being handled separately from the main conference registration. If you are interested in attending this workshop, select it during your conference registration process however you MUST also complete the survey via the following link

https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/3KTF6DG 

Presenter(s)
Josh Henkin

Presenter(s) Biographical Sketch
After years of successfully mentoring science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) job seekers, Josh founded STEM Career Services, a career coaching company aimed at helping STEM graduates launch and sustain careers outside of academia. Josh conducts workshops at conferences, universities and institutes across the country and provides career coaching to STEM graduates at all career levels. These efforts have earned Josh a position on the National Postdoctoral Association (NPA) Board of Directors, where he sits on the executive committee and serves as the nonprofit’s treasurer. In addition, Josh is an American Association for the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Career Development Center subject matter expert.

Concurrent with his work at STEM Career Services, Josh is a program manager at The Tauri Group, a science and technology consulting company. At the Tauri Group, Josh builds and leads teams that provide a full range of technical and programmatic support to Department of Defense (DoD) vaccine and therapeutic development programs. He contributes a blend of management support, subject matter expertise, strategic planning, risk management and knowledge of the FDA regulatory landscape.

Prior to these roles, Josh worked at Medtronic as a principal field scientist in its cardiac

rhythm disease management division, where he managed a portfolio of investigator-initiated clinical trials to promote innovative research with implantable cardiac devices.

As a AAAS Science and Technology Policy Fellow, Josh worked closely with the DoD as a scientific advisor for the Undersecretary of Defense for Laboratories and Basic Sciences, creating policies and managing basic science programs.

A lifelong athlete, Josh played rugby for 20 years at the collegiate, national and international levels. He has authored research articles on muscle biology, exercise physiology and fitness, is a certified strength and conditioning expert and has started several companies in the exercise/fitness space. He holds a BS in business administration, a MS in nutritional sciences and a PhD in cell and molecular biology, all from the University of Vermont.

Expected Background of Participants
There are no required or expected areas of experience or knowledge or expertise. Participants will likely be a diverse group of individuals at all points in their careers, from many different specialties. In order to have a

Expected Audience
This workshop is aimed at attracting faculty, postdocs, PhD students, MS students, administrators as well as engineers from industry. The selection process will strive to select a diverse set of participants from underrepresented groups, as well as others interested in the topic.

Need for the Workshop or Tutorial
The goal of the Broadening Participation committee is to develop, implement and oversee new and existing activities aimed at broadening the participation of women and underrepresented minorities in the activities of Design Engineering Division of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. This workshop will be the tenth workshop event of the Broadening Participation committee. In previous years, this workshop has been supported through funding from the ASME DED Executive Committee and the National Science Foundation. The committee intends to seek similar funding to support student travel and speaker fees for this workshop. It’s often difficult to feel part of the ASME DED community, especially for under-represented members in engineering. In addition, when compared to majority group members, under-represented members of a group do not receive as much informal mentoring that supports professional development. This workshop will enhance the feeling of community among members of the ASME DED and provide valuable professional development skills.

Impact
This workshop will continue the efforts of the Broadening Participation Committee to support the development of a community feeling within ASME DED. In addition, volunteers from among workshop attendees will be solicited to join the committee to support additional committee activities in the coming years. 

Course Outline
1:00 – 4:00 STEM Career Services Workshop
Contents will include how to interpret job postings and tailor applications accordingly, how to build the skills required to help your career during grad school, and networking skills.
4:00 – 5:00 Panel of Experts from DED Community related to diverse career choices
5:00 – 6:00 Introduction to ASME Design Division & social
5:00 – 5:05 Introduction
Describe Broadening Participation Committee mission / objective
Introduce each ASME DED technical & other committee chairs & chair of Design Division.
5:05– 6:00 Social / Interact with Technical Committees and Design Division Executive Committee (with refreshments)
6:00 – 6:30 Social / continue discussions for those that can stay

Workshop 5: Free MR Workshops: Designing, Prototyping and Programming Robot Motions using MotionGen and SnappyXO

Date: Aug 29, 2018, on Wednesday.
Time: 3:30-5:10

Organizers/Presenter
Anurag Purwar
Research Associate Professor, Mechanical Engineering, Stony Brook University

Workshop Abstract
This workshop will demonstrate a state of the art app called MotionGen for designing and simulating planar linkages and a novel robot kit called SnappyXO for rapid prototyping of the robot motions and structures. The app and the robot kit are being used in Freshman Design Innovation, undergraduate and graduate Kinematics class at Stony Brook University.

SnappyXO robot kit is a low-cost, modular, and innovative kit, which allows structural prototyping of robot chassis and their motions. It works with off-the-shelf electronics, open source software, and employs an open architecture to allow users to design and make their own parts.

Presenter(s) Biographical Sketch
Anurag Purwar is an Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering at Stony Brook University and the primary inventor and creator of the SnappyXO robot kit and MotionGen app. His research and teaching interests are in Mechanisms and Robotics, Kinematics, and CAD/CAM. He has received several best paper-, teaching-, and design innovation-awards.

His research has been funded by National Science Foundation (NSF), NY-state SPIR, NY-state Center for Biotechnology, Sensor-CAT, SUNY Research Foundation, industry, Stony Brook University, and SUNY Office of Provost.

He has been twice elected as a member of the ASME Mechanisms and Robotics committee and served as the Program Chair for the 2014 ASME Mechanisms and Robotics Conference, as the Conference Chair for the 2015 ASME Mechanisms and Robotics Conference and has served as symposium and session chairs for many ASME International Design Engineering Technical Conferences. He was the general Conference Co-Chair for the 2016 ASME International Design Engineering Technical Conferences (IDETC/CIE).

Anurag Purwar is currently an Associate Editor of the ASME Journal of Computing and Information Science in Engineering and of International Journal of Mechanics Based Design of Structures and Machines.

Expected Background of Participants
Participants are expected to have at least a basic understanding of planar linkages. Participants will need to bring a computer with working internet connection. This will be a hands-on workshop leading participants to the design of linkages using MotionGen and then prototyping them using the SnappyXO robot kit.

Expected Audience
Professors teaching design innovation, kinematics, mechatronics, students interested in these subjects, and industry practitioners looking to rapidly prototype their motion ideas will benefit from this workshop the most.

Need for the Workshop or Tutorial
There are practically no motion synthesis tools out there and the leading, commercially available robot kits are expensive. In addition, they don’t provide any significant design exposure to the students. This framework presented in this workshop will allow participants to learn how to design and prototype linkages for creating robot motions.

Course Outline

  1. Introduction to MotionGen
    1. Design and Simulate Planar Linkages: Hands-on Exercise
  2. Introduction to SnappyXO Robot Kit
    1. Design and Build Simple Geometry: Hands-on Exercise
    2. Design and Build a Simple Non-motorized Contraption: Hands-on Exercise
    3. Design and Build a Linkage-based Walking Robot driven by motors: Hands-on Exercise
    4. Leave with pointers for programming the robot using Microcontroller
Workshop 5 Motion Gen

Tutorial 1: Satisfaction Engineering Emerges in the Connected Society
1:00pm – 5:00pm

Date: Aug 26
Time: 1:00pm – 5:00pm

Organizers
Shuichi Fukuda
shufukuda@gmail.com

Abstract
Although it is well understood that IoT will change our society into the connected one, most discussions are being carried out in the traditional framework of engineering. As the products are getting connected, the number of degrees of freedom becomes tremendously large. Therefore, we are stepping outside of the rational boundary so that we have to satisfy ourselves with emotional satisfaction, as Herbert Simon pointed out. But how we can develop more satisfaction is rarely discussed.

Functions do not contribute anymore to value creation as much as they did. What becomes more important today is customer’s satisfaction. Customers are best satisfied when their expectations are well met.

To achieve this goal, we must remember products work now as a team and to satisfy our customers to a full extent, we should take psychological needs of humans into consideration, such as self-actualization, self-determination, etc.

Quickly emerging Connected Society will bring about a basic change in engineering framework where users are no more just players, but they are now playmakers. They make up the play. They create value themselves and enjoy.

Presenter(s)
Shuichi Fukuda
Keio University, System Design and Management Research Institute
mshufukuda@gmail.com

Presenter(s) Biographical Sketch
Prof. Shuichi Fukuda received Dr. of Engineering in ME from the University of Tokyo in 1972. Then, after working at the University of Tokyo, Osaka University and again University of Tokyo, he joined Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Technology as Professor in systems engineering and served Department Chair, Adviser to the University President, Dean of Engineering, Dean of Library and Information Systems and Director of Center for University-Industry-Government Collaboration. During these years, he worked as Visiting Professor at Stanford University, West Virginia University and Osaka University.

Since his retirement in 2007, he worked as Consulting Professor at Stanford University, Visiting Professor at Open University of Japan and Cranfield University, UK. He is now Adviser to System Design and Management Research Institute, Keio University.

He served President of ISPE, Vice President of Reliability Society, IEEE, and CIE Division Chair and Deputy Technical Group Leader, Systems and Design Group, ASME.

His research Interests are systems engineering, design engineering, emotional engineering, collaboration engineering, reliability engineering, decision making and management of engineering and technology.

He is member of Engineering Academy of Japan, Honorary Member of JSME, Fellow of ASME, IEICE and ISPE, and Glory Member of Reliability Engineering Association of Japan.

Expected Background of Participants
No prior knowledge necessary.Anybody in any field (even non-engineering) with any background are welcome, if he or she has an unbiased and open heart.

Expected Audience
Engineers and Managers from Industry, Undergrads, Postgrads, Faculty, Product users, SDGs pursuers, Those interested in sharing economy, Anyone interested in knowing how engineering and society would change with the advancement of the Connected Society.

Need for the Workshop or Tutorial
Although we know products will be connected, we do not understand what it really means. As Knute Rockne pointed out in American Football and Franz Beckenbauer demonstrated in soccer 11 best players do not make up the best team. The best team is made up by players who understand the current situation and what role he is expected to play and can respond to such expectations. We are no more just an element in the system, but are the playmaker. We must realize it is us who lead the product team to make up the best play.

Impact
This tutorial is not to provide knowledge about the methods and tools of the current engineering, but to let the participants realize and understand what a big change the Connected Society will bring about in the basic framework of engineering. It will be no more individual-product-focused. Products work together so their team organization and management will become crucially important. And values will be evaluated in terms of emotional satisfaction. Therefore, what we should develop is not products, but to satisfaction. Sharing economy is one aspect of such satisfaction engineering. We should consider how we can get customers inv

Course Outline

Major topics to cover

  1. Increasing difficulty of perceiving quality improvement
    Weber-Fechner Law
    Need for new market
  2. AI approach
    From exploitation (vertical expansion)
    to exploration (horizontal expansion)
  3. The Connected Society
    IoT, Industrie 4.0 - Their differences and their common goal
  4. 11 Best to Best 11
    11 Best Players do not make the best team. Best team is made by 11 players who understand the current situation and what role he is expected to play and to respond to such expectations very flexibly and adaptively.
  5. Individual product development Thto product team development
  6. The Connected Society is a tremendously large degree of freedom problem in an Open World.
    Rational approaches are no more applicable. It is the problem beyond the bounds of rationality. So, instead of optimization, we have to create value based on emotional satisfaction of customers
  7. Only customers know what is happening right now. So, they are no more just one of the players in the game, but they become playmakers. We must consider how we can bring them in.
  8. Tomorrow will be an age of experience creation and decision making will become very important.
  9. Sharing Economy – What It Means
  10. Expectation Management
  11. From Product-base Engineering to Satisfaction-creating Engineering

Tutorial 2: 4th Tutorial on Multibody Flexible Robot Design
1:00pm – 5:00pm

Date: Aug 26
Time: 1:00pm – 5:00pm

Organizers
Mariapaola D'Imperio
mariapaola.dimperio@iit.it

Abstract
This tutorial proposes a strategy for the integration between mechanics and control in the development process of a robot by using virtual prototyping techniques. Robots can be built both for industrial and for research purposes. In the first case, time, costs and reliability of the solution are considered as the main aspects in the development process, while in the second one the aim is to investigate the most advanced and challenging solutions. All these goals can be reached, more easily, if the whole development process of these devices passes through the creation of their virtual counterpart (known as “digital twins”), that offers the possibility of verifying whether both the mechanical and the control solutions are valid and good enough. After a brief introduction on the motivation of this work, the tutorial will be focused on the hands-on where all the participants will develop their own flexible robotic limb.

Presenter(s)
Ferdinando Cannella
Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia
ferdinando.cannella@iit.it

Mariapaola D'Imperio
Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia
mariapaola.dimperio@iit.it

Presenter(s) Biographical Sketch
Ferdinando Cannella, PhD received his first PhD in 2002 in “Mechanical Measurement applied to Engineering” with Thesis “Optical Measurement of strain: Application on Timing Belt” and his second PhD in 2006 in “Mechanical Engineering” with Thesis “Stiffness Modelling and Kinematic Analysis of Carton Handling and Manipulation with a Reconfigurable Mechanism using Numerical Simulation”. He joined on 2008 to the Italian Institute of Technology and from 2010 he is in Advanced Robotics Department lead by Prof. Darwin Caldwell: the topic is the Flexible Multi-Body Simulations applied to the development of Manipulators, Packaging and Biomedical Devices. From 2015 is Head of the Advanced Industrial Automation Lab.

Mariapaola D’Imperio, PhD received her Master’s Degree in Civil Engineer in 2011 from Polytechnic University of Marche, Ancona, Italy and Ph.D. in Robotics in 2016 from the University of Genoa, Italy. The principal subjects of her Master’s Degree were stability of structures, Mechanic of Materials and Structures and Analytical Structural Analysis; while her PhD topic concerned the Modelling and Simulation Techniques for Advanced Robotic Systems. Actually she is a Post Doc at the Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia and her research interests are focused on the development of several multi-body-finite elements (MBM-FE) models able to interact with control algorithms, with the aim of promoting an integrated approach in the design of highly dynamic robotic systems. The research involves also the identification process of all the model parameters required to develop a reliable numerical model.

Expected Background of Participants
Basic knowledge of kinematics, dynamics and linear controls.

Expected Audience
This workshop is addressed to faculty, PhD students, MS students as well as engineers from industry having research interests in the area of robotic design and control.

Need for the Workshop or Tutorial
Three intense hours of hand-on is the effort required to the attendees in order to achieve the robot modelling skill. The goal of the tutorial is the ability to accomplish new exercises/their own projects autonomously in the future. 

Impact
The participants will be fully trained to design the complete multi-body robot limb with flexible component at their home.

Course Outline
15 min - Introduction
30 min - Design of a flexible robotic limb
15 min – Break
15 min – MSC Adams environment overview
90 min – Rigid body and rigid connection modelling
30 min – Modelling of structural flexibility
30 min – Control schema implement

Tutorial 3: Decoding the Lost and Incomplete Ancient Mechanisms and Machines
9:00am – 12:00pm

Date: Aug 26
Time: 9:00am – 12:00pm

Organizers
Kuo-Hung Hsiao
khhsiao@mail.nstm.gov.tw

Abstract
Numerous ingenious machines were invented in the past thousands of years. However, due to incomplete documentation and loss of finished objects, most of the original machines cannot be verified and many of the inventions did not pass down to later generations. This tutorial is devoted to presenting an innovative methodology in the area of mechanical historiography for the systematic reconstruction designs of the ancient machines that have been lost to time. Its purpose is to generate all possible design concepts of lost machines based on the literature records and/or preserved objects. The first section introduces the study, classifications, and historical development. The second section provides a systematic approach for the reconstruction of all feasible topological structures of lost/incomplete machines. This approach is applied to converge the divergent conceptions form the results of literature studies to a focused scope, and then applies the mechanical evolution and variation method to obtain possible reconstruction designs that meet the scientific and technological standards of the subject’s period. The third section presents three examples of lost designs, such as Chinese repeating crossbows, Antikythera mechanism, and mechanical automata with music-playing device. Finally, the forth section offers a process of the reconstruction results that have been successfully designed, manufactured, and used for exhibitions at the museum as an application of science education.

Presenter(s)

Kuo-Hung Hsiao
Collections and Research Division
National Science and Technology Museum
Kaohsiung, Taiwan.
khhsiao@mail.nstm.gov.tw

Jian-Liang Lin
Exhibition Division
National Science and Technology Museum
Kaohsiung, Taiwan.
golduser007@gmail.com

Yu-Hsun Chen
Department of Mechanical Engineering
National Cheng Kung University
Tainan, Taiwan
n18021062@mail.ncku.edu.tw

Chia-fen Lee
Public Service Division
National Science and Technology Museum
Kaohsiung, Taiwan
chiafen@mail.nstm.gov.tw

Dr. Kuo-Hung Hsiao
Dr. Kuo-Hung Hsiao received his PhD from the Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Taiwan, in 2007. He previously served as senior engineer at Episil Technologies Inc., Hsinchu, Taiwan and was a postdoctoral researcher at National Cheng Kung University. Currently, he is an Associate Researcher at the Collections and Research division, National Science and Technology Museum (Kaohsiung, Taiwan). He is interesting in the research filed of the History of Mechanism and Machine Science, reconstruction designs of ancient mechanisms, and mechanism designs. Now, he focuses on the research of locks & keys, especially in ancient Chinese puzzle locks. He published 32 academic papers and 4 books.

Dr. Jian-Liang Lin
Dr. Jian-Liang Lin works as an Assistant Research at the Exhibition division of National Science and Technology Museum (Kaohsiung, Taiwan). He received the PhD from the Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, in 2011. His research areas include mechanism designs, reconstruction designs of ancient machinery, Maker and STEAM education, and analysis of manufacturing process. He published 22 papers and one book about decoding the mechanisms of Antikythera astronomical device.

Yu-Hsun Chen
Ms. Yu-Hsun Chen is a PhD Candidate under guidance of Prof. Hong-Sen Yan (Tainan, Taiwan) and Prof. Marco Ceccarelli (Cassino, Italy). Her research interests include aspects of both Mechanism Design and History on Mechanics and Machine Science. She has worked on mechanism design, synthesis and analysis, with a particular focus on reconstruction of ancient mechanical devices with unknown structure. Other specific subject of interest is teaching aids development for science education on mechanical technology. In the past years, she has enrolled in the research projects about the typical automata with music-playing devices and ancient clocks in the Forbidden City.

Chia-fen Lee
Currently the staff in the marketing team of the National Science and Technology Museum (Kaohsiung, Taiwan), also a lecturer at Wenzao Ursuline University of Languages. She got Master degrees in Museum Studies from University of Leicester, now is a PhD student major in Industrial Design at the National Cheng Kung University (Tainan, Taiwan).

Expected Background of Participants
Basic knowledge of mechanisms and interest in history of machines.

Expected Audience
Faculty, undergraduate students, graduate students, and general interest

Need for the Workshop or Tutorial
Since ancient machines are unique, classic and interesting, the reconstruction results can provide the scholars and experts as a serial teaching material to promote students’ learning enthusiasm in both mechanisms and history areas. They also can be charming products to companies for business usesMoreover, to reconstruct the lost/incomplete ancient machines, the basic knowledge of mechanical principle and theories are required to carry out the works such as structural synthesis, arrangements of design standards and motion simulation. For future research and innovations, the participation of experts and scholars in mechanical field are more than welcome.

Impact
The reconstruction design procedure utilizes the idea of creative mechanism design methodology to synthesize all possible designs based on the exciting literature and/or preserved items. Although there isn’t any new archaeological findings, this procedure is able to generate the feasible mechanism results systematically that provides a new orientation on reconstructions of ancient machines.

Course Outline

  1. Introduction: Classification and Research Background (Prof. Yan)
  2. Design Procedure: the Systematic Reconstruction Methodology (Prof. Yan)
  3. Examples:
    Repeating Crossbows in ancient China (Dr. Hsiao)
    Antikythera mechanism (Dr. Lin)
    Mechanical automata with music-playing device (Ms. Chen)
  4. Applications: From basic research to exhibition in museum (Ms. Lee)