IDETC/CIE

IDETC/CIE

International Design Engineering Technical Conferences
& Computers & Information in Engineering Conference

Cleveland Convention Center, Cleveland, Ohio

Conference
August 6-9, 2017

 
 

Program - Keynotes & Special Sessions

 

19th International Conference on Advanced Vehicle Technologies (AVT)

KEYNOTE
Monday, August 7th
11:00am – 12:00pm
Room 24
Xin Guan

Xin Guan, Jilin University

Cyber Proving Ground for Intelligent Vehicles on Driving Simulator

Abstract
I Intelligent vehicles present a new research and development frontier in the automotive industry given the likelihood an intelligent vehicle will become available in the near future. The validation, verification, and calibration of intelligent vehicles are costly, time-consuming, and risky when carried out with an actual car in real environments. Consequently, using a driving simulator as the cyber-proving-ground offers a better way to validate, verify, and calibrate intelligent vehicles. This presentation will describe the means of using a driving simulator for intelligent vehicles being developed at Jilin University, and addresses the challenges of cyber proving ground on simulating the complexities of the stochastic driver and vehicle traffic within the traffic environment. In addition, this presentation explores the theory and test methodology of how drivers receive cues for following, safety, efficiency, and lawful driving style. It also discusses how a statistical database for driving styles of Chinese drivers is established (using a large number of experiments) with consideration of drivers' operation time-history signal and physiological and psychological states. In addition, it describes the modeling of the complex traffic environments and the dynamic simulation methods. This presentation also includes a discussion of how the stochastic driver-model was established using the statistical characteristics of driving behaviors to represent the group of drivers. With this model, the behavior of realistic anthropomorphic vehicle traffic was accurately simulated. Research on the virtual sensors is also presented along with a quick-culling model to simulate the camera and radar and to obtain objects from the cyber-proving-ground. Finally, an intelligent vehicle controller was integrated with the cyber-proving-ground driving simulator and successfully calibrated. The method offers considerable savings of money and time and avoids the numerous trials and safety risks associated with field testing.

Biography
Professor Guan currently serves in several key positions in the Chinese automotive sector, including the Vice-President of the Society of Automotive Engineers of China, the editorial board of the International Journal of Vehicle Performance, the Director of the Automotive Dynamics Branch of the National Automobile Standardization Committee, the Jilin Provincial Government Counselor, and the leading expert of the overall group of 863 major projects of the Chinese Ministry of Science and Technology. Prof. Guan served as Dean of the College of Automotive Engineering of Jilin University from 2004 to 2012, and the Director of the State Key Laboratory of Automotive Simulation and Control from 1996 to 2015. He has received three first-prize awards for provincial scientific and technological achievements. In addition, he received the Golden Bull Award of National Key Laboratory Program provided by the Ministry of Science and Technology in 2008, the China Automobile Industry Youth Science and Technology Award in 1998, and the China Science and Technology Outstanding Achievement Award from GM in 1996.

The specific academic contributions of Dr. Xin Guan include:

  • Established, in 1993, the State Key Laboratory of Automotive Simulation and Control at Jilin University and successfully developed the first vehicle driving simulator with an investment of more than 25 million Chinese Yuan. The simulator was designated as one of the top in Asia, and has been successfully applied to the development of more than 10 independent vehicles in China.
  • Created a unique vehicle dynamics with stick-slip friction model, wheel carcass dynamics, and dynamic steering system model. The model successfully solves shortcomings with the classic model, which is not accurate when simulating high-speed steering, shimmy, and other transient processes.
  • Investigated a universal driver model that integrated controls of the longitudinal and lateral motion of vehicles, which can be used for various driving simulations of intelligent vehicles. The model gives a unique innovation scheme that complies with level 3+ intelligent vehicles.

MILIKEN LECTURE  
Tuesday, August 8th
9:10am – 10:50am
Room 24
Martin Jones

Martin Jones, Moog Industrial Group

Tracing the Origins of the Automated 'fly-by-wire' Technology Used in Contemporary Formula 1 Cars

Abstract
The lecture starts with a review of the early work done on vehicle stability done at CAL in the 1950's by Bill Milliken and his colleagues made possible by then recent developments in hydraulic technology. It moves on to describe the subsequent development of active suspension and associated systems by Lotus Engineering and Team Lotus in the early 1980's and the widespread adoption of this technology by Williams GP and the other F1 teams around 1990. At this point there is a brief analysis of why hydraulic technology has been used almost universally in these applications despite dramatic developments in electric motor performance. After a review of the automated systems or 'driver aids' used on the current crop of Formula 1 and WEC cars, the lecture concludes with a description of other applications of F1 miniature hydraulics, Namely: Autonomous Robots, America's cup yachts and Oil & gas exploration.

Biography
Martin Jones works as Motorsport Market Manager for the Moog Industrial Group in the UK-where he is responsible for the development & technical support of Moog's global motor racing business. He studied Physics and Economics at the University of East Anglia and subsequently Control Engineering at Bath University. In a career of over 35 years at Moog he has been instrumental in the design and development of many automated actuation systems including:

  • Wave compensated hoisting systems for offshore cranes.
  • Active suspension and satellite guidance systems for agricultural vehicles.
  • Servo-controlled levelling of large man-lifts (Access platforms).
  • Closed-loop Frequency and Power regulation of multi-phase water turbines.
  • High speed gauge control systems for aluminum rolling.
  • Numerous servo-actuations systems for F1 –and the development of unconventional technology for power steering and fly by wire braking.

Martin's interest in Motorsport extends beyond work and he is also a keen competitor in Historic Motorsport events in his Brabham BT21.

37th Computers and Information in Engineering Conference (CIE)

KEYNOTE
Monday, August 7th
11:00am – 12:00pm
Room 1
Gahl Berkooz

Gahl Berkooz, Acorns

Data, Analytics, and Internet of Things: the perfect storm and some Grand Challenges

Abstract
"Data and Analytics" is a unique engineering business practice. Unlike mechanical, aerospace, or electrical engineering the state of practice in industry is ahead of the theoretical foundations provided by academic research. This state of affairs is dictated by the tremendous business opportunities afforded by the underlying technologies. I will discuss the state of the art in Data and Analytics practice, and elucidate some of its drivers and complexity factors. I will close by describing some "Grand Challenges" – engineering problems that practitioners in industry are attempting to solve, yet lack a rigorous framework to support their solution.

Biography
Gahl Berkooz is the Chief Data and Analytics Officer for Acorns, whose mission is to make Americans financially empowered by financial literacy, saving, and investing. Prior to Acorns, he was Chief of Analytics for General Motors' Global Connected Customer Experience Division. At GM he was responsible for all Analytical Data Sets, Analytics, and Data Science required to delight customers with the best customer experience in the industry. Prior, he established the Information Management and Analytics function at Ford Motor Company. He built the function to over 100 professionals, and delivered close to $2 Billion of savings and cost avoidance in business operations. He holds a Ph.D. in Applied Mathematics from Cornell University, a Six Sigma Black Belt, and is a graduate of Harvard Business School's General Management Program.

43rd Design Automation Conference (DAC)

KEYNOTE
Monday, August 7th
9:10am – 10:50am
Room 1

Data-Driven Engineering Design

Data has always been an integral part of the engineering design process. We use this basic and unfiltered information to create knowledge, which in turn informs our engineering design decisions. Yet, the miniaturization of electronics, the Internet of Things, and social media provides engineers with access to a plethora of data in forms, volumes, and acquisition rates not previously encountered. To most effectively make use of this data, the design engineering research community must understand how to most effectively transition this data into actionable design knowledge. This keynote session will include a panel of distinguished speakers who will address a wide variety of opportunities that include the acquisition and analysis of unstructured data from various sources, handling large volumes of data that must be searched and understood, and synthesizing data in a way that leads to better engineered products. Speakers discussing the frontier of Data-Driven Engineering Design will include Kemper Lewis (University at Buffalo), Eleanor Feit (Drexel), Ritesh Khire (84.51°), and a set of lightning talks by early-career members of the Design Automation Conference.

Invited Speakers

Elea McDonnell Feit, Drexel University

Biography
Elea McDonnell Feit is an Assistant Professor of Marketing at Drexel University and a Senior Fellow of Marketing at The Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania. Her research focuses on leveraging customer data to make better product design and advertising decisions, particularly when data is incomplete, unmatched or aggregated. Much of her career has focused on developing new quantitative methods and bringing them into practice, first working in product design at General Motors, then commercializing new methods at the marketing analytics firm, The Modellers, and most recently as the Executive Director of the Wharton Customer Analytics Initiative, where she built the academic-industry partnership program. She brings a rich understanding of industry problems to her research, which has been published in Management Science and the Journal of Marketing Research. She enjoys making analytics and statistics accessible to a broad audience and has recently co-authored a book on R for Marketing Research and Analytics with Chris Chapman. She regularly teaches popular tutorials and workshops for practitioners on digital marketing, marketing experiments, marketing analytics in R, discrete choice modeling and hierarchical Bayes methods as well as undergraduate, MBA and MS Business Analytics classes at Drexel and Wharton. She holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Michigan, an MS in Industrial Engineering from Lehigh University and a BA in Mathematics from the University of Pennsylvania.

Kemper Lewis, University at Buffalo

Biography
Kemper Lewis is Professor and Chair of the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering and also holds an appointment as Professor in the Department of Management Science and Systems at the University at Buffalo (UB). In addition, he serves as the Director of the Sustainable Manufacturing and Advanced Robotic Technologies (SMART) Community of Excellence and as a Site Director of the National Center for e-Design at UB. His research focuses on foundational issues in decision making in engineering design and his contributions have spanned complex decision networks, tradeoff models, adaptive systems, and design analytics. He has published over 200 articles in journals, conference proceedings, and books and is a fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. In recognition of his scholarship in design research and education, he has received awards from ASME, SAE, ASEE, AIAA, NSF, NASA, and the State of New York.

Ritesh Khire, 84.51° LLC

Biography
Ritesh is a Senior Research Scientist and leader of the optimization group within the Science department of 84.51° LLC (a customer science organization within Kroger). His primary research includes developing efficient methodologies for large-scale data-driven optimization problems. The majority of these problems involve 108 to 1012 mixed-integer decision variables, where the underlying models are derived from one or more sophisticated Machine Learning techniques, such as regular & logistic regressions, random forest, neural networks, re-enforcement learning, dynamic linear models, recursive least square models, etc. The application areas include price and promotion optimization, customer personalization, trade fund optimization, inventory management, and many others. Many of these problems include both static and real time aspects of decision making. Ritesh has been exploring decomposition based optimization approaches that blend traditional (gradient based) optimization techniques with non-traditional techniques (e.g. Bayesian optimization, GA, PSO, etc.) to solve these large-scale problems. He is also interested in high-performance computing and GPU computing.

Ritesh obtained his PhD from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) in 2006 under the guidance of Prof. Achille Messac. In the past, Ritesh has been invited as special speaker for the 2010 NSF panel on future of MDO and for the 2008 ASME-IDETC panel on System integration tools. He is an active member of the DAC conference and has organized many special sessions over the last 10 years. Ritesh has published a collection of book chapters, journal & conference papers, and patents over the last decade. Prior to joining 84.51, Ritesh was a Staff Research Scientist at United Technologies Research Center for over 8 years, where his research primarily focused on optimization of engineering systems.

14th International Conference on Design Education (DEC)

KEYNOTE
Monday, August 7th
11:00am – 12:00pm
Room 23
Sunand Bhattacharya

Sunand Bhattacharya, Autodesk, Inc.

Radical Collaboration by Design in Engineering Education

Abstract
The culture of innovation in the classroom has been spreading rapidly across all levels of education and challenging the boundaries of classical design and engineering studies. The greatest potential for companies like Autodesk to serve design-related-education exists at the intersection of three convergences:

  • Designing, Making, and Using
  • Infinite Computing, Digital Manufacturing, and The Internet of Things
  • Creating Places, Things, and Media

The future of making and learning things exists at the nexus of these three convergences. We need radical collaboration if we are to truly address the nexus of design, make, use; infinite computing, digital manufacturing, and internet of things; and places, things, and media. Successful integration of this curricular effort into disciplines of engineering and design is important for bridging the gap between education and industry expectations.

Is design-related-education embracing these trend, technologies and new workflows to holistically address next generation's desire to innovate?

Biography
As part of the Autodesk Education Experience Group, Sunand Bhattacharya manages its Learning Futures team. In this role, he is responsible for the strategy, management and evangelization of Autodesk’s future influence advocacy in global academia.

Prior to Autodesk, Sunand was the principal and co-founding partner of Arjuna Learning Designs LLC., a firm specializing in the creation of interactive learning objects to enhance quality of teaching and learning for name brand publishing houses. He is also a tenured professor of industrial design, and has held executive positions at, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale. Sunand is a recipient of the Innovative Excellence in Teaching, Learning, and Technology award from The International Conference on College Teaching and Learning.

Sunand is a graduate in Industrial Design from the National Institute of Design (NID) in India and holds his terminal graduate degree in Industrial Design and Human Factors from The Ohio State University.


PANEL SESSION To Be a Makerspace or Not to be: Panel on Maker Space and Machine Shop Synergies
Monday, August 7th  
4:00pm – 5:40pm  
Room 23  

Some Mechanical Engineering Departments may be finding themselves at crossroads between more open maker spaces and traditional machine shops, where access is often restricted. While each of those spaces has very specific purposes, this panel will examine maker spaces as a learning environment and how they are integrated across the fabrication continuum at universities. The panel will start with each panelist introducing the maker space and/or machine shop facility at their institution and any special/unique aspect that they may have. Then we will continue with some of the following questions:

  • What is the future of maker spaces, and how are students from traditional engineering backgrounds benefiting from them?
  • How do traditional machine shops fit in the picture? Should shops pivot away from "production" mentality and embrace rapid prototyping? Can traditional shops and maker spaces mutually co-exist? And how do (or should) we overcome the tinkering stereotype for maker spaces?
  • What are the state of the art technologies that can enhance the effectiveness of a fabrication spaces that includes a maker space and a machine shop?
  • What are the must have elements of a fabrication space for schools that are planning to design and or renovate their maker space? Should traditional shops rethink their tools and equipment to supplement maker spaces?
  • What is the maker space beyond making? How do we design for this?
  • How do we encourage and develop an inclusive and welcoming environment that fosters learning and engagement for all students?
  • Other topics that the panelists would like to share.
  • Questions from audience.

Featured Speakers

Sunand Bhattacharya

Sunand Bhattacharya, Autodesk, Inc.

Biography
As part of the Autodesk Education Experience Group, Sunand Bhattacharya manages its Learning Futures team. In this role, he is responsible for the strategy, management and evangelization of Autodesk's future influence advocacy in global academia.

Prior to Autodesk, Sunand was the principal and co-founding partner of Arjuna Learning Designs LLC., a firm specializing in the creation of interactive learning objects to enhance quality of teaching and learning for name brand publishing houses. He is also a tenured professor of industrial design, and has held executive positions at, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale. Sunand is a recipient of the Innovative Excellence in Teaching, Learning, and Technology award from The International Conference on College Teaching and Learning.

Sunand is a graduate in Industrial Design from the National Institute of Design (NID) in India and holds his terminal graduate degree in Industrial Design and Human Factors from The Ohio State University.


Robert Nagel

Robert Nagel, James Madison University

Biography
Since joining James Madison University, Nagel has helped to develop the Department's six course engineering design sequence, and he is lead instructor of the two-course, client-based sophomore design experience. Nagel earned his Ph.D. from Oregon State University, his M.S. from the Missouri University of Science and Technology, and his B.S. from Trine University—all three in mechanical engineering. Nagel, a strong proponent of undergraduate research, performs research related to understanding how interventions impact students' abilities to design and understand systems. Currently, Nagel is investigating the impact of functional modeling on students' ability to understand, represent, and design systems, and the impact of student engagement in university maker spaces on students' design self-efficacy and student learning.


Jesse Austin-Breneman

Jesse Austin-Breneman, University of Michigan

Biography
Austin-Breneman earned his PhD from MIT and was a postdoctoral research associate in the MIT Ideation Lab and the MIT Global Engineering and Research Lab. His research focuses on system-level approaches to difficult engineering design problems, such as large-scale complex system designs and product design for emerging markets. His work uses empirical studies, practitioner interviews and simulations to gain insight into issues facing multi-disciplinary design teams working in these fields. He is particularly interested in how teams manage competing objectives throughout the design process and formal strategies for helping them do so. Austin-Breneman leads the Global Design Laboratory and he is the faculty advisor for BLUElab, a sustainability engineering student organization


Panel Moderator

Daniela Faas

Daniela Faas, Olin College

Biography
Daniela Faas, Senior Lecturer in Mechanical Engineering, Director of Design and Fabrication Operations, Olin College Prior to joining Olin College, Dr. Faas was the senior preceptor in design instruction at the John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Science at Harvard University. Dr. Faas was a Shapiro postdoctoral fellow in the Mechanical Engineering Department at MIT after receiving her Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering and Human-Computer Interaction from Iowa State University. Dr. Faas graduated from Bucknell University with her M.S. in Mechanical Engineering and joint B.S./B.A. in Mechanical Engineering and International Relations. Dr. Faas is currently a research affiliate in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at MIT. Her research focuses on developing low cost immersive Virtual Reality applications for products and systems, early stage design process and methodology and engineering education.


Tuesday, August 8th  
9:10am – 10:50am  
Room 23  
Karen E. Crosby

Karen E. Crosby, Southern University Baton Rouge, Louisiana

Overview of Undergraduate Stem Education Research and Related NSF Funding Opportunities

This session will present various funding opportunities to support STEM education projects offered through the Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE) at the National Science Foundation (NSF). An NSF/DUE Program Director will share details about current programs such as Advanced Technological Education (ATE), Scholarships in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (S-STEM), Improving Undergraduate STEM Education (IUSE), and other select NSF funding opportunities that support engineering education. Time permitting, the session will culminate with helpful hints and fatal flaws to consider when developing proposals.

Biography
Dr. Karen E. Crosby is a Professor of Mechanical Engineering at Southern University Baton Rouge, Louisiana, currently on assignment as a Program Director in the Division of Undergraduate Education at the National Science Foundation. Dr. Crosby's technical expertise is in materials science and engineering. Additionally, Karen is dedicated to Science, Technology, Science, and Mathematics (STEM) education research, especially enhancing student motivation, retention, and learning in engineering through innovative teaching methods and integrating research experiences. Her latest projects involved STEM outreach and education, including enhancing and creating academic programs and facilitating global research opportunities in sustainability, specifically materials and technology for renewable energy applications and next-generation composites. Her years of work have garnered local awards for excellence in teaching and research and national recognition for educational leadership and mentoring. When she is not working, Karen enjoys spending time with family and friends experiencing good food, good music, and traveling.

22nd Design for Manufacturing and the Life Cycle Conference (DFMLC)

KEYNOTE
Monday, August 7th
11:00am – 12:00pm
Room 22
David K Harrsion

David K Harrsion, Glasgow Caledonian University

Sustaining "Small Scale" Research Over the Long Term

Abstract
In the proposed presentation the Author will attempt to illustrate the relationship between Design, Manufacture and monitoring towards the end of life recycling of manufactured products based on research work that he has directed over recent years. The Author will also set the foregoing in the context of the changing societal priorities and will explain the typical supporting infrastructure that seeks to influence and support new research work.

Attention will not only be given to direct government support, often indirect through agencies, but also to the assistance offered by Professional Bodies, Charities, and also the opportunities afforded by mutually beneficial international collaboration.

Biography
David is currently Professor of Design & Manufacturing at Glasgow Caledonian University where he has held a range of managerial roles. He has spent his working career in the manufacturing industry or industry-facing academia. A graduate of UMIST, he is the joint author of the textbook "Systems for Planning & Control in Manufacturing". He has also edited several books and conference proceedings and has published his work widely. He has supervised 64 PhD students through to graduation, most of whom have been embedded in manufacturing companies. Around half of these students have been based outside the United Kingdom. He is a Visiting Professor of the University of Mining & Metallurgy, Krakow in Poland. He is an experienced external examiner at Undergraduate, Masters and Doctoral levels and has examined in China, Australia, India, Africa, Poland and Germany, as well as throughout the United Kingdom.

David is an Ex Deacon of the Incorporation of Hammermen of Glasgow, which received its "Grant of Arms" in 1536 and thereby may claim to be one of the World's older "Engineering Societies". David is also a Past President of the Institution of Engineers & Shipbuilders in Scotland. Currently, David is the Secretary of the United Kingdom Engineering Professors' Council representing the combined interests of all of the University Engineering Departments to Government, Professional Bodies and other Stakeholders. He is also a Trustee of the Trades House of Glasgow, a Director of Glasgow Chamber of Commerce and a Director of Glasgow Merchants House. He additionally holds office in four Glasgow-based Charities.


SPECIAL SESSION
Monday, August 7th
2:00pm – 3:40pm
Room 22

DFMLC-13-1: Lightning Talks on the Sustainable Design Frontier

This lightning talk session provides a brief overview of the broad range sustainability papers from the DAC, DTM and the DFMLC conferences. The purpose is to quickly raise audience awareness of the sustainability work going on across the IDETC conferences, and build a cohesive community in design for sustainability. Each speaker will present a five minute, timed 15 slide overview of their full length IDETC presentation. A broad range of cutting edge, interdisciplinary topics relevant to sustainable design will be presented.

The talks will range from design principles to data analytics, smart systems, formal methodology, tools, domain modeling, experimental studies, educational issues and industrial practices. Specific topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • Sustainable design principles
  • Sustainability of advanced manufacturing technologies
  • Social factors in design and manufacturing
  • Sustainability of energy systems
  • Innovative life cycle assessment models
  • Environmental sustainability awareness
  • Smart systems for sustainability

29th International Conference on Design Theory and Methodology (DTM)

This conference will not host a keynote session this year.

13th ASME/IEEE International Conference on Mechatronic & Embedded Systems & Applications (MESA)

KEYNOTE
Monday, August 7th
11:00am – 12:00pm
Room 19
James H. Christensen

James H. Christensen, Holobloc Inc.

Evolution of Embedded Platforms for Cyber-Physical Systems

Abstract
Today's definition of Cyber-Physical Systems (CPS) as "engineered systems that are built from, and depend upon, the seamless integration of computational algorithms and physical components" has evolved from Wiener's 1948 definition of cybernetics as the scientific study of "control and communication in the animal and the machine."2. Along this evolutionary path we have seen developments such as the concept of Holonic Manufacturing Systems3 (HMS) in the 1990s, and the release in the early 200s of the multi-part IEC 61499 Standard for the development and deployment of reusable software modules (function blocks) in distributed, intelligent automation and control systems.

In recent years, the capabilities of embedded hardware and software platforms have evolved sufficiently to present the possibility of cost-effective embedding of CPS functionality to meet the requirements anticipated by HMS and now expressed in domains such as Industrie 4.07, the Smart Grid8 and Open Process Automation9. In this talk we will explore the emergence of standardized, open-sourced embedded hardware, software and development environments to make that possibility a reality.

Biography
James H. Christensenreceived the Ph.D. degree in chemical engineering and computer science from the University of Wisconsin at Madison in 1967. He is currently with Holobloc Inc., Cleveland Heights, OH, USA. He is an internationally recognized expert in the standardization and application of advanced software technologies to the automation and control of manufacturing processes. Dr. Christensen received the Rockwell International Engineer of the Year and Lynde Bradley Innovation Awards in 1991 for his achievements in pioneering applications of object-oriented programming in Smalltalk, and in 2007, he received the IEC 1906 Award and Process Automation Hall of Fame membership for recognition of his accomplishments in the international standardization of programming languages and architectures for industrial automation.

41st Mechanisms and Robotics Conference (MR)

KEYNOTE
Monday, August 7th
11:00am – 12:00pm
Room 26 A
Roger D. Quinn

Roger D. Quinn, Case Western Reserve University

Animals as Models for Robot Mobility and Autonomy: Crawling, Walking, Running, Climbing and Flying - Case Western Reserve University Biologically Inspired Robotics

Abstract
The capabilities of current mobile robots pale in comparison to those of most animals. The goal of our research is to bridge this gap by studying animal systems and applying these designs and even their materials to robots to improve their mechanical designs, autonomous behaviors, locomotion, and energy efficiency. We are using multiple complementary approaches. In one approach the fundamental principles of insect locomotion are applied using existing technologies and in a simplified manner. Their motor control is also simplified and the agility of these vehicles makes them suitable for many applications such as amphibious operations and search and rescue. This abstracted approach has also been used to develop a small fixed-wing vehicle called MALV (micro air and land vehicle) that flies, lands and crawls. Using a more direct approach we are developing other robots including a moth-like robot with compliant, flapping wings that mimic those of the animal. We have also developed a number of robots with multi-segmented legs mirroring those of animals. For these robots, we are developing synthetic nervous systems for their control based upon animal neurobiology. We are also developing structurally soft worm-like robots, which crawl via peristaltic waves, for pipe inspection and, when made compact, within the body. Robots with a human in the loop for basic control decisions are limited in their movements in complex terrain because of sparse sensory data and limited communications. Some autonomy is essential for their agility. Insect neurobiology and behavioral experiments are being used to develop decision making strategies. Our autonomous Snowmower, benefits from a distributed control architecture similar to that found in animals and will eventually implement an animal-inspired brain. In still another approach, teaming with the Case bio-fabrication group we are developing small robots using organic materials.

Biography
Roger D. Quinn is an Arthur P. Armington Professor of Engineering at Case Western Reserve University. He joined the Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering department in 1986 after receiving a Ph.D. (1985) from Virginia Tech and M.S. (1983) and B.S. (1980) degrees from the University of Akron. He has directed CWRU Biologically Inspired Robotics since its inception in 1990. His research, in collaboration with biologists, is devoted to the development of robots and control strategies based upon biological principles. Dozens of robots have been developed to either improve robot performance with biological principles or model animal systems. He has authored more than 250 publications and 9 patents on practical devices resulting from his work. His biology-engineering collaborative work on behavior based distributed control, robot autonomy, human-machine interfacing, soft robots, and neural control systems have each earned awards.


KEYNOTE
Monday, August 7th
8:00am – 9:00am
Room 9
Larry Howell

From Micromachines and Surgical Instruments to Spacecraft: How Origami-Based Engineering can Impact our World

For centuries origami artists have invested immeasurable effort developing origami models under extreme self-imposed constraints (e.g. only paper, no cutting or gluing, one regular-shaped sheet). The accessible and formable medium of paper has enabled swift prototyping of vast numbers of possible designs. This has resulted in stunning origami structures and mechanisms that were created in a simple medium and using a single fabrication process (folding). The origami artists' methods and perspectives have created systems that have not previously been conceived using traditional engineering methods. Using origami-inspired methods, it may be possible to design origami-like systems, but using different materials and processes to meet emerging product requirements. This presentation will highlight research in origami-based engineering at Brigham Young University, and will include a diverse set of applications.

Biography
Larry L Howell is an Associate Dean and Professor at Brigham Young University (BYU). Prof. Howell received his B.S. degree from BYU and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from Purdue University. Prior to joining BYU in 1994 he was a visiting professor at Purdue University, a finite element analysis consultant for Engineering Methods, Inc., and an engineer on the design of the YF-22 (the prototype for the U.S. Air Force F-22 Raptor). He is a Fellow of ASME, past chair of the ASME Mechanisms & Robotics Committee, and has been associate editor for the Journal of Mechanisms & Robotics and the Journal of Mechanical Design. He is the recipient of the ASME Machine Design Award, ASME Mechanisms & Robotics Award, Theodore von Kármán Fellowship, NSF Career Award, Purdue Outstanding Mechanical Engineer (alumni award), and the BYU Karl G. Maeser Distinguished Lecturer Award (BYU's highest faculty award). Prof. Howell's research focuses on compliant mechanisms, including origami-inspired mechanisms, space mechanisms, microelectromechanical systems, and medical devices. He is the co-editor of the Handbook of Compliant Mechanisms and the author of Compliant Mechanisms published by John Wiley & Sons. His lab's work has also been reported in popular venues such as Newsweek, Scientific American, Popular Science, and the PBS documentary program NOVA.

11th International Conference on Micro- and Nanosystems (MNS)

KEYNOTE
Monday, August 7th
11:00am – 12:00pm
Room 13
Arvind Raman

Arvind Raman, Purdue University

Atomic Force Microscopy Imaging and Spectroscopy of Soft Matter and Complex Materials Enabled by Nanomechanics and Microcantilever Dynamics

Abstract
"To engineer the tools of scientific discovery" has been described as one of fourteen grand challenges for engineering by the US National Academy of Engineering. Since it's invention more than thirty years ago the Atomic Force Microscope has proven to be such a tool, continuing to have a transformational effect on materials engineering and nanoscience. It's ability to "mechanically" image features smaller than one nanometer on a vast variety of samples in liquids, gases, or in vacuum remains unmatched by the best optical or electron microscopes.

We discuss recent advances in two challenge areas for the atomic force microscope – one in the imaging and force spectroscopy on soft materials such as polymers and live cells, and the second in the sub-surface imaging of complex materials such as nano-composites. Both advances rely on significantly improved modeling of tip-sample nanomechanics and understanding its effect on microcantilever vibrations. In the former, new contact mechanics models that explicitly take into account local relaxation and surface forces are needed and their influence on microcantilever dynamics need to be interpreted. In the latter, computational models of electrostatic and stress interactions in the sub-surface need to be coupled to microcantilever observables to enable non-destructive sub-surface reconstruction in complex materials. Both computational and experimental results are presented.

Biography
Dr. Arvind Raman is the Robert V. Adams Professor of Mechanical Engineering at Purdue University. His research focuses on applications of nonlinear dynamics, vibrations, and fluid-structure interactions in nanotechnology/MEMS/NEMS, manufacturing, and biomechanics. He has mentored twenty-two PhD students, co-authored more than a hundred and thirty peer-reviewed journal articles, held visiting positions at the Universidad Autonoma de Madrid (Spain), University of Oxford (UK), and Technical University Darmstadt (Germany), and secured funding from the NSF, NIH, NASA, NNSA, and several national and international industrial sponsors. He is an ASME fellow, an ASME Gustus Larson Memorial Award recipient, Keeley fellow (Wadham College, University of Oxford), College of Engineering outstanding young investigator awardee, and a NSF CAREER awardee.

Professor Raman joined Purdue University in 2000 as an Assistant Professor following a PhD in Mechanical Engineering from the University of California at Berkeley advised by Prof. C. D Mote Jr. (1999), MS in Mechanical Engineering from Purdue University (1993), and a B. Tech in Mechanical Engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi (1991). He was promoted to Associate Professor (2005), full Professor (2009) and named the Robert V. Adams Professor of Mechanical Engineering at Purdue University (2013). Since May 2014, he is the inaugural Associate Dean for Global Engineering Programs, leading College strategic initiatives for global education, research, and engagement in Latin America, sub-saharan Africa, Middle East and North Africa, and East Asia.


KEYNOTE
Tuesday, August 8th
11:00am – 12:00pm
Room 13
>Christian A. Zorman

Christian A. Zorman, Case Western Reserve University

Integration of Process-Incompatible Materials for Microfabricated Polymer-Based Neural Interfaces

Abstract
The desire to utilize microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technology in applications where silicon is not well-suited has necessitated the development of materials not commonly used in IC processing. This talk presents an overview of several collaborative research projects to develop MEMS-based devices for long-term neural interfacing. These projects include: (1) development of a microfabricated cortical probe from a chemoresponsive, mechanically-dynamic, nanocomposite polymer, and (2) development of a polymer-based thin film transfer technology for mechanically-flexible diamond-on-polymer microelectrodes. Both projects involved the use of materials that offered interesting opportunities and/or challenges with respect to their mechanical properties. A central, unifying theme among these projects is the fabrication of key structural device components using newly developed materials and/or the fabrication of devices using materials that are incompatible with respect to the way they are commonly processed.

Biography
Christian A. Zorman received a B.S. cum laude in physics and a B.A. cum laude in economics from the Ohio State University in 1988, followed by M.S. and Ph.D. in physics from Case Western Reserve University in 1991 and 1994, respectively. He joined the MEMS program at CWRU in 1994 as a Research Associate, was promoted to Senior Research Associate in 1997 and Researcher in 2000. From 2000 to 2002, he held an appointment as Adjunct Assistant Professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. He joined the EECS faculty at CWRU in 2002 as an Associate Professor and currently holds an appointment as Professor with secondary appointments in the Departments of Biomedical Engineering and Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. Dr. Zorman is also a Research Associate at the Louis Stokes Cleveland VA Medical Center where he serves as Co-Director of Research and Scientific Affairs for the Advanced Platform Technology Center of Excellence. He currently serves as Faculty Director of the Microfabrication Laboratory at CWRU.

Prof. Zorman has authored over 250 peer-reviewed technical publications, is a Senior Member of IEEE and chairman of the MEMS Technical Group in the American Vacuum Society. In 2009, Professor Zorman received the John S. Diekhoff Award for Excellence in Graduate Mentoring, CWRU's highest honor in this area. His research centers on the development of novel, enabling materials and the requisite processing techniques for micro- and nanoelectromechanical systems with an emphasis on applications in challenging environments.

13th International Conference on Multibody Systems, Nonlinear Dynamics, and Control (MSNDC)

KEYNOTE
Tuesday, August 8th
2:00pm – 2:50pm
Room 26 A
Giuseppe Rega

Giuseppe Rega, Sapienza University of Rome

From Understanding Nonlinear Phenomena to Exploiting Global Dynamics for Engineering Safety

Abstract
Understanding nonlinear dynamics phenomena in solid/structural mechanics has required about forty years of intense theoretical and applied research efforts, which can be tentatively framed within some main stages of development. The first three of them encompass nonlinear oscillations addressed through analytical methods, bifurcations and complex dynamics investigated via geometrical and computational techniques, experimental testing of the nonlinear response of small-scale models aimed at cross-validating theoretical and numerical outcomes. The first part of the talk overviews some relevant representative achievements, by referring to the suspended cable as to a continuous/reduced-order archetypal model, or an experimental system, exhibiting a satisfactory variety of issues and phenomena typical of the nonlinear dynamics of smooth flexible systems with initial curvature.

The fourth stage of current development is characterized by a marked hybridization of nonlinear dynamics with other theoretical and application areas, which include control, consideration of also micro/nano, intelligent, or coupled systems, and multiphysics problems. The second part of the talk dwells on the role that nonlinear dynamics is expected to play in the near future to meaningfully affect the analysis, control and safe design of real engineering systems. Focus will be in particular on how to properly exploit concepts and tools of global dynamics for evaluating robustness and safety of the response in presence of unavoidable imperfections, as well as for controlling and possibly improving the system/structure load carrying capacity, independent of its specific mechanical and dynamical features, of its possible multi-dimensional character, and of the spatial scale of the relevant application.

Biography
Giuseppe Rega has been a Professor of Solid and Structural Mechanics at the Sapienza University of Rome from 1995 to 2016 and, formerly, at the University of L'Aquila, where he was the Head of the Department of Structure, Water and Soil Engineering. He taught to students in Civil and Mechanical Engineering, and Architecture, where he established an innovative Master degree on Structures. At Sapienza, he was Chairman of the Ph.D. Program in Structural Engineering, and Director of the Doctoral School in Civil Engineering and Architecture. Former Chairman of the Italian Committee of Professors of Solid and Structural Mechanics, he was President of AIMETA (Italian Association of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics). Currently, he is Chairman of the EUROMECH Nonlinear Oscillations Conference Committee, Italian Representative at the IUTAM General Assembly, member of the Scientific Council of CISM (International Centre for Mechanical Sciences). He has served with major Archival Journals as E-i-C (Meccanica), current/past AE (Journal of Vibration and Control, Prikladnaya Matematika i Mekhanika/Chaos Solitons&Fractals, ASME Journal of Computational and Nonlinear Dynamics, Mathematical Problems in Engineering), and EB member (Nonlinear Dynamics, International Journal of Dynamics and Control). He has organized many International Conferences/Symposia in the broad area of nonlinear dynamics and control of mechanical and structural systems (EUROMECH Colloquia: 1994, 2009; IUTAM Symposia: 2003, 2010; 7th European Nonlinear Dynamics Conference, 2011; scientific events at ICTAM, ASME, EURODYN Conferences). Plenary/Keynote Lecturer at more than 20 International Conferences, he gave seminars at academic institutions all over the world. Honored with an International Conference at Virginia Tech, and a Special Issue of Nonlinear Dynamics for his 60th birthday, and a Special Issue of International Journal of Non-Linear Mechanics for his 70th birthday. Has published 142 papers in 50 different Archival Journals, 74 Book/Edited Volume Chapters, nearly 100 Refereed Conference Proceedings papers, and has edited 4 Springer volumes and 7 Special Issues in top-level Archival Journals. He has always paid a lot of effort in mentoring young students, many of whom are appointed at various Academic institutions, via also international collaborations.

His main contributions to nonlinear dynamics are concerned with cable dynamics, nonlinear oscillations, bifurcation and chaos in applied mechanics and structural dynamics from macro- to micro-scale, reduced-order modelling, control of oscillations and chaos, exploitation of global dynamics for engineering safety, smart materials, coupled oscillators, thermomechanical problems. He has used the combination of analytical, computational, geometrical, and experimental techniques needed to carefully detect and reliably characterize the variety of nonlinear and complex dynamic phenomena possibly occurring in different engineering areas.


SPECIAL SESSION - Autonomous and Connected Vehicles
Tuesday, August 8th
2:50pm – 5:40pm
Room 26 A

FEATURED SPEAKERS

Joshua Every

Joshua Every, Transportation Research Center Inc.

Vehicle Automation – Beyond the PR

Abstract
Vehicle automation systems stand to change many aspects of our society, including a fundamental change in how we approach mobility. There is a growing public perception that vehicle automation is a solved problem; though, there remain significant unanswered questions between the state of the art and the future. An overview of the on-going activity in this space provides insight into the current state of automated driving, with a focus on discussing unsettled topics in this area.

Biography
Joshua L. Every received his PhD in Mechanical engineering from The Ohio State University, with research focused on vehicle testing and active safety system development. Upon Graduation he joined Transportation Research Center Inc. (TRC Inc.) as a research scientist contracted to NHTSA's Vehicle Research and Test Center (VRTC) focusing on developing testing procedures to verify the safety of automated vehicles. Recently, Josh transitioned to TRC's R&D division to become the Automated Vehicle and ADAS Lead, in conjunction with the construction of TRC's SMART Center. His current work is focused on creating testing methods for vehicle automation systems, and developing procedures to ensure the safety of controlled environment testing and on-road deployments.


>Eric Nutt

Eric Nutt, Mandli Communications

The Challenges of an Effective Base Map for Autonomous Vehicles

Abstract
Autonomous Vehicles (AVs) are a hot topic right now. Most major automobile companies are projecting near-future timelines for commercial vehicles with advanced autonomy. There is also general agreement that, in order for AVs to become a reality, a Base Map must be created and maintained. There exist numerous challenges to achieving a usable Base Map including collection and processing of data, accuracy, ownership, update frequency, communication, insurance, and standards just to name a few. In this presentation we will explore several of these challenges as they relate to the future computational requirements of AVs, and of the infrastructure required to support them.

Biography
Eric Nutt is the Head of Technology for Mandli Communications, Inc., a high-tech solutions company developing large-scale data collection and processing systems that support our State DOTs in their mission to reduce traffic deaths to zero by converting vast information into actionable intelligence.

Before taking on the challenges of strategic planning at Mandli Communications, Eric oversaw the research and development of data collection vehicles and data processing software — leveraging his Electrical Engineering and Computer Science degrees from UW-Madison to establish Mandli Communications, Inc. as the leader of large-scale network data collection and delivery projects across the country.

Passionate about employee empowerment and engagement, Eric leverages his knowledge and experience to help build and coach successful agile teams.


Carmine Senatore

Carmine Senatore, Exponent, Inc.

Automated Vehicles: Current Landscape and Future Directions

Abstract
In the last decade automated vehicles (AV) have quickly transitioned from research lab concepts to becoming an impending reality. With the recent release of the Federal Automated Vehicles Policy (FAVP) the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) introduced a framework to foster and guide AV testing and ultimately deployment. The fast paced evolution, motivated by the desire of enhanced safety, increased mobility and higher efficiency has been facilitated by the advancement in sensing, processing, and ultimately computing power. Yet scientists, researchers, and engineers still face hurdles to bring this technology to market. This presentation will provide an overview of latest AV developments including challenges and opportunities for researchers in this area.

Biography
Dr. Senatore is a Senior Associate at Exponent, Inc. specializing in advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS), vehicle-to-vehicle communications (V2V), automated vehicle technologies, and on-road and off-road vehicle dynamics. He has experience with robotic systems, image processing, and sensing technologies, with application to the defense, space, automotive, agricultural, and mining industry. Since joining Exponent, he has designed and conducted experiments to investigate sensor fusion strategies for V2V safety applications and the use of automotive advanced sensors for the purpose of accident investigations. Dr. Senatore obtained his Ph.D. in Engineering Mechanics at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. Prior to joining Exponent, Dr. Senatore was a research scientist at MIT, where he collaborated with national agencies, research institutions, and private companies to study how vehicles and robotic systems interact with unstructured environments. He has developed extensive knowledge of vehicle mobility analysis, including the development of strategic and tactical tools to support NASA Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) and Mars Exploration Rover (MER) missions.

2017 ASME International Power Transmission and Gearing Conference (PTG)

KEYNOTE
Monday, August 7th
11:00am – 12:00pm
Room 16
Karsten Stahl

Karsten Stahl, Technical University of Munich

Role of Gears in Electrified Vehicles

Abstract
This presentation discusses the impact of increasing production volume of electrified vehicles on geared transmissions. Electrified vehicles impose special requirements on gears in the drive train. An outlook on chances and challenges of gears in an electrified mobile world is given.

Biography
Dr. Karsten Stahl studied mechanical engineering at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and served as research associate at the Gear Research Centre (FZG) at TUM. In 2001 he received his PhD degree (Dr.-Ing.) in mechanical engineering and started as gear development engineer at BMW in Dingolfing, where he became head of the group "Prototyping, Gear Technology & Methods" in 2003. 2006 Stahl changed to the BMW/MINI plant in Oxford, UK, becoming department leader "Validation Driving Dynamics and Powertrain". In 2009 Stahl returned to Munich as manager for "Predevelopment and Innovation Management" within BMW Driving Dynamics and Powertrain in Munich.

2011 Karsten Stahl accepted a chair and became full professor at the Institute for Machine Elements and director of the FZG with about 80 associates, 50 of them PhD candidates, and more than 200 students. Organized in 5 departments, Prof. Stahl's research focuses on experimental and analytical investigations of endurance, tribology, NVH, materials and fatigue life analysis. In the focus of his research are components like cylindrical-, bevel-, hypoid- and worm-gears, clutches, synchronizers, rolling element bearings and drive systems.

Prof. Stahl is board member of the WiGeP and several other scientific associations, convener of ISO/TC 60/SC 2 working group 6, editor in chief, editor and associate editor of several scientific journals, president and scientific committee member of several national and international conferences and holds the VDI ring of honor. He has published more than 100 scientific papers and presentations.


KEYNOTE
Tuesday, August 8th
11:00am – 12:00pm
Room 16
Avinash Singh

Avinash Singh, Global Propulsion Systems General Motors

Role of Transmissions in Enabling Vehicle Fuel Economy

Abstract
In this presentation, some of the emerging trends in vehicle technologies will be reviewed. These trends are driven by fuel economy, drivability, and safety challenges facing the automotive industry. Often times, these technologies pose unexpected challenges for the automotive transmission. The innovation needed within the transmission to enable these technologies will be explored.

Biography
Dr. Avinash Singh is an Engineering Group Manager in the Global Transmission and Electrification Advanced Engineering organization of General Motors. He leads advanced technology development for all Transmission and Electric/Hybrid Drive Unit Components and Subsystems, including gear systems, continuously variable units, bearings, torque converters, clutches, structures, and pumps.

Dr. Singh received his BS degree in Mechanical Engineering from IIT Varanasi (BHU), India, and his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Mechanical Engineering from the Ohio State University, Columbus, OH. He currently serves on the Board of trustees of the not-for-profit Gear Research Institute (GRI) at Penn State. He had served two terms as an Associate Editor of the ASME Journal of Mechanical Design. He is also a past chair of the ASME Power Transmission and Gearing Committee.

Dr. Singh has authored numerous journal and conference papers and has 9 patents issued/pending. He has been recognized with the Boss Kettering Award, GM's highest technical honor. He is a Fellow of the ASME.

29th Conference on Mechanical Vibration and Noise (VIB)

KEYNOTE
Monday, August 7th
9:10am – 10:50am
Room 26 A
K. W. Wang

K. W. Wang, University of Michigan - Ann Arbor

Inspired by Nature – Adaptive Modular Metastructures

Abstract
During the past few decades, due to the advances in materials, electronics, and system integration technologies, structural dynamics and controls researchers in various engineering disciplines (e.g., aerospace, civil, mechanical) have been investigating the feasibility of creating adaptive structures. The vision is to develop a multifunctional structural system that has various embedded and distributed autonomous functionalities, such as vibration and stability controls, shape reconfiguration and morphing, materials and mechanical property variations, energy harvesting, and health monitoring and healing. From a structural system point of view, one of the major challenges is on how to best synthesize the cross-field and local-global coupling characteristics of the various adaptive materials and elements to optimize the overall structure performance. In recent years, interesting approaches have been explored to achieve adaptive metastructures based on synergistic modular architectures, often observed in nature, such as in biological or atomistic systems. It is recognized that to achieve significant new advances in adaptive structural systems, researchers have to conduct even more cross talks among various fields. This presentation will discuss some of the recent interdisciplinary research efforts in synthesizing nature-inspired adaptive metastructures for structural mechanics, vibration and wave adaptation and controls.

Biography
Dr. Kon-Well Wang is the Stephen P. Timoshenko Professor and Tim Manganello/BorgWarner Department Chair of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Michigan. He received his Ph.D. degree from the University of California at Berkeley in 1985, worked at the General Motors Research Labs as a Senior Research Engineer, and then started his academic career at the Pennsylvania State University in 1988. At Penn State, Professor Wang has served as, among others, the William E. Diefenderfer Chaired Professor in Mechanical Engineering, Director of the Structural Dynamics and Controls Lab, Associate Director of the Vertical Lift Research Center of Excellence, and Group Leader for the Center for Acoustics and Vibration. He joined the University of Michigan in 2008.

Professor Wang's main technical interests are in structural dynamics and vibrations. His work has created new emerging directions in the field via exploring piezoelectric circuitry networks, multistable & metastable modular structures, fluidic cellular-composites and origami, and nano-composites. He has developed knowledge and methodologies to synthesize novel adaptive structural systems for advancements in vibration control and damping, vibration confinement and localization, vibration energy harvesting, damage identification, wave propagation tailoring, shape morphing, and energy trapping & absorption. Professor Wang is a Fellow of the ASME, the Institute of Physics (IOP), and the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). He has received numerous awards; including the SPIE Smart Structures and Materials Lifetime Achievement Award, the ASME Adaptive Structures and Materials Systems Award, the ASME N. O. Myklestad Award, the ASME Rudolf Kalman Award, the ASME Adaptive Structures and Material Systems Best Paper Awards, the NASA Tech Brief Award, and the SAE Ralph Teetor Education Award. He has delivered many Keynote/Plenary lectures at ASME, SPIE and AIAA conferences in the U.S., as well as at various international conferences in Europe and Asia.

Professor Wang has provided extensive service and leadership to the professional community. He has chaired the ASME Technical Committee on Vibration and Sound, the ASME Mechanical Engineering Department Heads Executive Committee, and various standing committees for the ASME. He has been a member of the ASME Design Engineering Division Executive Committee and Technical Branch/Committee in Adaptive Structures in ASME and AIAA. He has organized and led various workshops and conferences, such as the SPIE Damping and Isolation Conference and the ARO Workshop on Smart Structures. He has been involved in many editorial activities, including served as the Chief Technical Editor for the ASME Journal of Vibration and Acoustics. He is currently an Editorial Advisory Board Member for the Journal of Sound & Vibration, an Editorial Board Member for book series on Computational and Experimental Methods in Structures, and an Associate Editor for the Journal of Intelligent Material Systems & Structures.


KEYNOTE
Tuesday, August 8th
11:00am – 12:00pm
Room 26 A
I. Y. (Steve)

I. Y. (Steve) Shen, University of Washington Seattle

Development of Lead-Zirconate-Titanate (PZT) Thin-Film Microactuators for Inner Ear Hearing Rehabilitation

Abstract
Hearing loss is a common disability in aging seniors and people who work long hours in noisy environments. For patients who are nearly deaf, surgeons often place an electrode array in cochlea, known as a cochlear implant, to stimulate auditory nerves. Recent medical research indicates that combination of a cochlear implant (electric-based) and a traditional hearing aid (acoustic-based) has proved to enhance speech recognition significantly. A grand challenge is to develop an intra-cochlear acoustic microactuator to realize the combined stimulations. A successful development requires fusion of knowledge from various fields, including vibrations, acoustics, material science, micro-fabrication, smart materials, mechatronics, cochlear mechanics, and audiology.

In this presentation, I will discuss design, fabrication, and testing of a piezoelectric-based intra-cochlear microactuator. The microactuator employs a lead-zirconate-titanate (PZT) thin film to transversely vibrate a diaphragm of size "0.8 mm × 0.8 mm × 2 μm" to generate pressure waves in cochlea. Major challenges affecting its vibration performance include electric circuit layout, electrode size, residual stresses, piezoelectric coefficients measurements, and fabrication processes. Testing in an aqueous environment shows that surrounding liquid presents significant added mass. Experimental measurements also indicate that the acoustic microactuator may experience a snap-through phenomenon. Finally, an acute animal test confirms that the intra-cochlear microactuator does produce pressure waves audible to the animal.

Biography
Dr. I. Y. (Steve) Shen is a Professor of Mechanical Engineering Department of the University of Washington. He received his BS and MS degrees from National Taiwan University, and his PhD degree from the University of California, Berkeley, all in Mechanical Engineering.

Professor Shen's general research area is vibration, dynamics, sensing, and actuation. In particular, his expertise includes PZT thin-film micro-sensors/actuators, insect dynamics, medical devices, and spindle and rotor dynamics. In the areas of PZT thin films, he is developing micro-sensors and actuators for various future applications, such as structural health monitoring sensors and hybrid cochlear implants. In the area of insect dynamics, he is studying vibration of flapping wings and pulsating thorax in order to develop sensors and actuators for motion control and guidance of flapping-wing micro-aerial vehicles. In the area of medical devices, he is developing microphones and microactuators to enable intra-cochlear hearing aids. He is also developing clinical tools to nondestructively evaluate dental implant stability. In the area of spindle and rotor dynamics, he is developing computational algorithms to predict vibration of complex rotating machines, such as hard disk drives and cyclic symmetric rotors.

Professor Shen is a Fellow of American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME). He is currently the Technical Editor of ASME Journal of Vibration and Acoustics.

10th Frontiers in Biomedical Devices (BIOMED)

This conference will not host a keynote session this year.